1. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    19 Feb '12 14:13
    Theists and Atheists have different views about Death, everyone knows that. Theists all over the world, across various religions, believe that Death , as we know it, is not an end but just an intermediate happening. But how do the Atheists view Death, not only in general terms but as a personal event which that person has to face one day ?
    I think that will immediately focus on how the Atheists , view themselves ? As individuals possessing an identity, an ego or just a jumble of bio-chemical reactions started off when the sperm and the ovum together form the zygote ?
    I will be thankful for atheists if they state here how they view their impending death.
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    19 Feb '12 17:46
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Theists and Atheists have different views about Death, everyone knows that. Theists all over the world, across various religions, believe that Death , as we know it, is not an end but just an intermediate happening. But how do the Atheists view Death, not only in general terms but as a personal event which that person has to face one day ?
    I think tha ...[text shortened]... ygote ?
    I will be thankful for atheists if they state here how they view their impending death.
    It is conceivable that there is an atheistic view of death that allows for most of the trappings of the theistic view, without the theos. Theism, and in particular, western monotheism, incorporates an afterlife as intrinsic to theism, but it is not necessarily exclusive to theism. Nor is it always intrinsic -- the the Jewish faith has plenty of room for those who do not envision an afterlife.

    Easter traditions allow for relationships with "deity" that probably strain the traditional view of God+afterlife, as well. Of course some might want to classify anyone who believe that something survives our deaths, to be a theist. But what if what survives it is the All, from which we proceed, and to which we return?

    So I don't think that everyone knows the distinction you point out.
  3. SubscriberFMF
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    19 Feb '12 17:58
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Theists all over the world, across various religions, believe that Death , as we know it, is not an end but just an intermediate happening.
    Not so. I am a theist but I have absolutely no reason to believe that death is not the end. I have no reason whatsoever to believe it is "an intermediate happening".

    Why do you feel death is a problem?
  4. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    20 Feb '12 05:27
    Originally posted by FMF
    Not so. I am a theist but I have absolutely no reason to believe that death is not the end. I have no reason whatsoever to believe it is "an intermediate happening".

    Why do you feel death is a problem?
    Death is no " problem" to any theist and that includes me. I understand that you, a theist , do not believe that Death is an intermediate happening. Do you believe that Death is a finality ? Your views are welcome. The O. P.is, however seeking the views of the atheists.
  5. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Feb '12 05:50
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Death is no " problem" to any theist and that includes me. I understand that you, a theist , do not believe that Death is an intermediate happening. Do you believe that Death is a finality ?
    I believe it is a "finality" for all of us, including you, and all theists and atheists.
  6. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    20 Feb '12 06:18
    Originally posted by JS357
    It is conceivable that there is an atheistic view of death that allows for most of the trappings of the theistic view, without the theos. Theism, and in particular, western monotheism, incorporates an afterlife as intrinsic to theism, but it is not necessarily exclusive to theism. Nor is it always intrinsic -- the the Jewish faith has plenty of room for those ...[text shortened]... nd to which we return?

    So I don't think that everyone knows the distinction you point out.
    My O.P.seeks views of atheists about Death because atheism is based on Reason and Scientific Method and disavows Faith. As I read the views of atheists here, I am curious as to how they view themselves. Free Will is denied by modern neuroscientists and without Free Will, human beings are reduced to a masses of flesh, bones, muscles etc.subjected to a series of biochemical reactions, with no clue as to the meaning of their own existence. So what is their view about Death ? Hinduism, Islam, Christian theology have detailed views about Death. I do not know about Judaism or Buddhism except that Buddhism denies soul and Death is probably a finality for them.
  7. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    20 Feb '12 06:28
    Originally posted by FMF
    I believe it is a "finality" for all of us, including you, and all theists and atheists.
    Hinduism believes that the individual soul is immortal and travels from one body to another unless that soul merges with God. Christianity and Islam talk about the day of judgement and afterlife. Death is not a finality for any of these 3 religions.
  8. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Feb '12 07:06
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Hinduism believes that the individual soul is immortal and travels from one body to another unless that soul merges with God. Christianity and Islam talk about the day of judgement and afterlife. Death is not a finality for any of these 3 religions.
    So? I am not a religionist, as I've said before.
  9. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    20 Feb '12 07:33
    Originally posted by FMF
    So? I am not a religionist, as I've said before.
    You are welcome to hold and voice your views. Your views however are not the views of a massive part of humanity.
  10. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Feb '12 08:021 edit
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Your views however are not the views of a massive part of humanity.
    What relevance is this to my view of death? What relevance is this to what actually happens to humans when they die? Do you think your "view of death" affects the reality of your death?
  11. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    20 Feb '12 09:25
    Originally posted by FMF
    What relevance is this to my view of death? What relevance is this to what actually happens to humans when they die? Do you think your "view of death" affects the reality of your death?
    Among the theists, your view of Death that it is a final event, must be in the minority of one. To that extent, your view is irrelevant or relevant depending on who is considering it--the massive majority of theists or yourself. As regards what happens to humans when they die, this issue is irrelevant to you, since you have already stated that Death is a final event. Since my view of Death is that it is an intermediate event, it prepares me much better to face the reality of my death. To that extent, my view is highly relevant to me.
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    20 Feb '12 09:36
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Theists and Atheists have different views about Death, everyone knows that. Theists all over the world, across various religions, believe that Death , as we know it, is not an end but just an intermediate happening. But how do the Atheists view Death, not only in general terms but as a personal event which that person has to face one day ?
    I think tha ...[text shortened]... ygote ?
    I will be thankful for atheists if they state here how they view their impending death.
    Death is the end of the line, no more brain activity or heartbeat. no afterlife, no waiting for jerusalem, no dreams, no new life as a dog, nothing, nada, nil, zero.
  13. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Feb '12 09:43
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Since my view of Death is that it is an intermediate event, it prepares me much better to face the reality of my death.
    How do you figure that? Personally, I would say imagining (and hoping for) an afterlife actually serves to replace the "reality of [your] death" with something that is not 'real'; rather like a doctor telling a patient that they are not going to die tomorrow when in fact they are going to die tomorrow. Does this 'reassuring' diagnosis by the doctor really help or "prepare" that patient to "face" the reality of death?
  14. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    20 Feb '12 09:52
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    Death is the end of the line, no more brain activity or heartbeat. no afterlife, no waiting for jerusalem, no dreams, no new life as a dog, nothing, nada, nil, zero.
    Can I interpret that as follows :- Atheists who define themselves as bundles of cells which undergo various biochemical reactions and which go on sputtering till the brain cells go phut one day and that's that, is it ?
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    20 Feb '12 10:09
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    My O.P.seeks views of atheists about Death because atheism is based on Reason and Scientific Method and disavows Faith.
    First, I would like to clarify here that atheists are those people who do not believe in God. Many atheists I know accept the scientific method as the best way to learn about the universe, but this is hardly a requirement of atheism. There are probably plenty of atheists who are very unscientific and may even have Faith in something other than a god.
    I must also point out that many theists accept the Scientific Method and Reason as important methods for learning about the universe, but they presumably put faith one rung higher on the ladder. They tend to run into problems when the two do not agree with each other (as is the case with life after death).

    Free Will is denied by modern neuroscientists and without Free Will, human beings are reduced to a masses of flesh, bones, muscles etc.subjected to a series of biochemical reactions, with no clue as to the meaning of their own existence.
    So do you accept the views of these modern neuroscientists? If not, why not? If not, why do you think atheists should accept them? Do you think their findings are valid science?

    What do you mean by 'meaning of existence' and why would us atheists be more clueless than you? I really don't see how it follows.

    How do you define 'free will'?

    So what is their view about Death ? Hinduism, Islam, Christian theology have detailed views about Death. I do not know about Judaism or Buddhism except that Buddhism denies soul and Death is probably a finality for them.
    I see death as a finality. I think this view is undeniable for anyone willing to actually think about it. In fact, I am willing to bet that you would be unwilling to continue this discussion if we actually go into the details as you know perfectly well that your views are not logical and you would not be willing to face up to that fact. I have brought up the topic many times on this forum and theists generally run for the hills every time it comes up.
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