1. Standard memberWulebgr
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    05 May '05 20:01
    St. Thomas Aquinas argued against taking the bible literally. He referred to the six days in Genesis as being favored "by the superficial reading of Scripture."

    Archbishop James Ussher proclaimed that every species of organism had been created at nightfall preceding Sunday, Oct. 23, 4004 BC and that they had remained permanently unaltered since then.

    Whose hermeneutic principles is more relevant to Christians today?
  2. Standard memberColetti
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    05 May '05 21:44
    Since Aquinas is the official philosopher of the RCC, then I would say he had the greatest impact on Christianity.
  3. London
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    05 May '05 21:482 edits
    Originally posted by Coletti
    Since Aquinas is the official philosopher of the RCC, then I would say he had the greatest impact on Christianity.
    The Catholic Church has no philosophy of its own. Thomism is highly regarded for its synthesis of the faith and philosophy, but so is Augustinianism and Scotism.

    EDIT: But yes, I'd say St. Thomas had the greater impact.
  4. Standard memberWulebgr
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    06 May '05 04:10
    Originally posted by Coletti
    Since Aquinas is the official philosopher of the RCC, then I would say he had the greatest impact on Christianity.
    Letme restate the question for clarity: who would feel more at home, and receive a warmer welcome among Chritians today in America and elsewhere?
  5. London
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    06 May '05 05:28
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    Letme restate the question for clarity: who would feel more at home, and receive a warmer welcome among Chritians today in America and elsewhere?
    I'm sure Bishop Ussher would receive the more vocal welcome from the extreme right of Christendom and more media attention; but I feel it is St. Thomas Aquinas who would feel more comfortable in the modern intellectual atmosphere. Most Christians recognise a smart bugger when they see one.
  6. Standard memberWulebgr
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    06 May '05 13:15
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    I'm sure Bishop Ussher would receive the more vocal welcome from the extreme right of Christendom and more media attention; but I feel it is St. Thomas Aquinas who would feel more comfortable in the modern intellectual atmosphere. Most Christians recognise a smart bugger when they see one.
    You seem to imply that Ussher was not a smart bugger.
  7. London
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    06 May '05 14:34
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    You seem to imply that Ussher was not a smart bugger.
    I'm sure Ussher was a reasonably smart chap in his day; after all, he was a well-known Biblical scholar. In a head-to-head, however, St. Thomas would've had him for dinner. Come to think of it, he wouldn't stand much of a chance against Augustine (who lived around a millennium before him) either. Several writers here on RHP (like Nemesio, for instance) would've given him a good run for his money.

    Based on their output, I think St. Thomas would've been the better placed of the two to synthesise Christian faith and modern technological and hermeneutical principles. In the wider Christian world (outside the sola scriptura/Bible inerrancy groups), his views would've gained more popularity.
  8. Et in Arcadia ego...
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    09 May '05 12:48
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    Letme restate the question for clarity: who would feel more at home, and receive a warmer welcome among Chritians today in America and elsewhere?
    Wait a minute? Where is this "elsewhere" of which you speak? I do hope that you are not implying the existence of a world outside of the U.S.A.? One with a couple of Christians in it?

    Come now.... I find that to be rather far-fetched. 😕
  9. Standard memberPhlabibit
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    09 May '06 15:29
    Originally posted by Coletti
    Since Aquinas is the official philosopher of the RCC, then I would say he had the greatest impact on Christianity.
    I thought Catholics were not Christians. RB said so.

    Now I am confused.

    P-
  10. Standard memberHand of Hecate
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    09 May '06 15:59
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    I thought Catholics were not Christians. RB said so.

    Now I am confused.

    P-
    What about the Jews Phlabibit?... tell us about the RB's wisdom regarding the Jews.
  11. Standard memberPhlabibit
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    09 May '06 16:43
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate
    What about the Jews Phlabibit?... tell us about the RB's wisdom regarding the Jews.
    He once PM'd me saying something like, "I hope you are not a Jew, cuz all Jews burn in Hell". I'm glad he was looking out for me.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I had Jesus in my heart next to Buddha and Jesus sucker punched Buddha for being a false God? Buddha was pretty upset, considering he never claimed to be a God.

    P-
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    09 May '06 16:50
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    He once PM'd me saying something like, "I hope you are not a Jew, cuz all Jews burn in Hell". I'm glad he was looking out for me.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I had Jesus in my heart next to Buddha and Jesus sucker punched Buddha for being a false God? Buddha was pretty upset, considering he never claimed to be a God.

    P-
    Violence is the only language Buddha understands.
  13. Standard memberHalitose
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    09 May '06 18:39
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    I thought Catholics were not Christians. RB said so.

    Now I am confused.

    P-
    I thought Catholics were not Christians.

    The principle that RB doesn't grasp is that a unity in faith does not preclude a diversity of expression.
  14. Standard memberNemesio
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    10 May '06 19:23
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    Several writers here on RHP (like Nemesio, for instance) would've given him a good run for his money.
    Now, come on. I'm blushing.
  15. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    10 May '06 19:44
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    Whose hermeneutic principles are more relevant to Christians today?
    Hermeneutic principles spring from the flesh like corn maidens all dolled up. --What was St. Thomas Aquinas like?
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