1. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
    Voice of Reason
    Joined
    28 Mar '06
    Moves
    9908
    16 Apr '09 15:34
    Was thinking about how people say jackie broke the colour barrier. I don't think so. Here's why.

    There were lots of black guys that wanted to play in the major leagues before him but weren't allowed. Jackie didn't one day just storm onto the field and say, "I"m playing and it's as simple as that!"

    No, quite different actually. Jackie was ALLOWED to play by a bunch of white guys. White guys allowed Jackie to play. Therefore white guys allowed the colour barrier to be broken. All Jackie did was do what he was told by white guys.

    At best, I'd say Jackie AGREED to break the colour barrier.

    It's a small distinction, I know, but how much credit/hoopla do the white guys that made the decision get?

    To me, Rosa Parks is more hero than Jackie Robinson.
  2. Joined
    05 Jan '04
    Moves
    45179
    16 Apr '09 15:40
    Originally posted by uzless
    Was thinking about how people say jackie broke the colour barrier. I don't think so. Here's why.

    There were lots of black guys that wanted to play in the major leagues before him but weren't allowed. Jackie didn't one day just storm onto the field and say, "I"m playing and it's as simple as that!"

    No, quite different actually. Jackie was ALLOWED to ...[text shortened]... ys that made the decision get?

    To me, Rosa Parks is more hero than Jackie Robinson.
    Branch Rickey gets plenty of credit for helping destroy the colour barrier in baseball.

    Do you even know who Branch Rickey is?
  3. Joined
    05 Jan '04
    Moves
    45179
    16 Apr '09 15:431 edit
    Also, to say Rosa Parks is more hero than Jackie Robinson (as if anyone cares who is "more of a hero"😉 seriously undermines Jackie's incredible contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.
  4. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
    Voice of Reason
    Joined
    28 Mar '06
    Moves
    9908
    16 Apr '09 15:501 edit
    Originally posted by darvlay
    Branch Rickey gets plenty of credit for helping destroy the colour barrier in baseball.

    Do you even know who Branch Rickey is?
    Yes, I am familiar with the heroic white guy you refer to.

    😵

    But he isn't mentioned anywhere near as much as JR
  5. Joined
    05 Jan '04
    Moves
    45179
    16 Apr '09 15:551 edit
    I'm getting out of this thread before I end up stabbing someone in the face.
  6. Subscribershortcircuit
    The Energizer
    where you want to be
    Joined
    28 Jan '07
    Moves
    66539
    16 Apr '09 18:081 edit
    Originally posted by uzless
    Was thinking about how people say jackie broke the colour barrier. I don't think so. Here's why.

    There were lots of black guys that wanted to play in the major leagues before him but weren't allowed. Jackie didn't one day just storm onto the field and say, "I"m playing and it's as simple as that!"

    No, quite different actually. Jackie was ALLOWED to ys that made the decision get?

    To me, Rosa Parks is more hero than Jackie Robinson.
    Maybe you should do a little more homework on Jackie Robinson.

    Yes, he was signed by Branch Rickey and "allowed" to play in the big leagues. However, do some research on the conditions he had to endure to be "afforded" the luxury of playing baseball. Segregated dressing facilities, bathrooms, hotels, buses. It was unbelievable. He even had to win over many of his bigoted teammates. Then there were the jeers from opposing team members and the fans. And then there was the media. Under the tremendous microcope, he was required to perform his talents in the game.

    You have no idea how difficult that was and you really show your lack of baseball accumen by your statement. Hank Aaron also went through similar, although to a lesser degree, amounts of the anger and ridicule as he chased down Babe Ruth's hallowed HR record. Can you imaging trying to do your job, whatever that may be, while hearing constant death threats made against you and your family? Can you honestly say your work performance would be exemplary under those conditions? No way, and yet Jackie Robinson and hank Aaron both endured this from city to city and for several years.

    Jackie Robinson was given the opportunity to break the color barrier, but if he had failed, the color barrier would have remained until someone else finally proved worthy. The fact that he succeeded under such extreme and adverse conditions is a testament to the man, and that is why he is honored and credited for breaking the color barrier.
  7. Madison Square Garde
    Joined
    03 Jan '06
    Moves
    186717
    17 Apr '09 00:01
    Originally posted by shortcircuit
    Maybe you should do a little more homework on Jackie Robinson.

    Yes, he was signed by Branch Rickey and "allowed" to play in the big leagues. However, do some research on the conditions he had to endure to be "afforded" the luxury of playing baseball. Segregated dressing facilities, bathrooms, hotels, buses. It was unbelievable. He even had to win ove ...[text shortened]... ment to the man, and that is why he is honored and credited for breaking the color barrier.
    Well said rec'd
  8. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
    Voice of Reason
    Joined
    28 Mar '06
    Moves
    9908
    17 Apr '09 05:52
    Originally posted by shortcircuit
    Maybe you should do a little more homework on Jackie Robinson.

    Yes, he was signed by Branch Rickey and "allowed" to play in the big leagues. However, do some research on the conditions he had to endure to be "afforded" the luxury of playing baseball. Segregated dressing facilities, bathrooms, hotels, buses. It was unbelievable. He even had to win ove ...[text shortened]... ment to the man, and that is why he is honored and credited for breaking the color barrier.
    You're barking up the wrong tree if you think i don't have an appreciation for racism in the US. You don't need to expose to me the insanity of the white american population and the sheer ignorance displayed for a few centuries by one of god's favoured countries

    But really, how hard is it to catch a fly ball?


    Baseball is a simple game. You hit the ball, you catch the ball, you throw the ball. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains....think about it.
  9. lazy boy derivative
    Joined
    11 Mar '06
    Moves
    71817
    17 Apr '09 10:44
    Originally posted by uzless
    You're barking up the wrong tree if you think i don't have an appreciation for racism in the US. You don't need to expose to me the insanity of the white american population and the sheer ignorance displayed for a few centuries by one of god's favoured countries

    But really, how hard is it to catch a fly ball?


    Baseball is a simple game. You hit th ...[text shortened]... hrow the ball. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains....think about it.
    If you can't stand baseball then why in the heck did you start this thread?
  10. Subscribershortcircuit
    The Energizer
    where you want to be
    Joined
    28 Jan '07
    Moves
    66539
    17 Apr '09 13:16
    Originally posted by uzless
    You're barking up the wrong tree if you think i don't have an appreciation for racism in the US. You don't need to expose to me the insanity of the white american population and the sheer ignorance displayed for a few centuries by one of god's favoured countries

    But really, how hard is it to catch a fly ball?


    Baseball is a simple game. You hit th ...[text shortened]... hrow the ball. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains....think about it.
    If it was so simple, everyone could play it...even you knucklehead!!
    I was a damn good player in my time, but not nearly good enough to hang with the likes of Jackie Robinson.

    If you really understood racism, your first post would tend to represent you as an idiot or a liar. I am not really sure which is more appealing to you.
  11. Standard memberPocketKings
    Banned from edits
    Grammar dyslexic
    Joined
    20 May '05
    Moves
    11372
    18 Apr '09 01:52
    I'm waiting for the day that a white guy breaks the color barrier in the NBA.
  12. Subscribershortcircuit
    The Energizer
    where you want to be
    Joined
    28 Jan '07
    Moves
    66539
    18 Apr '09 03:411 edit
    Originally posted by PocketKings
    I'm waiting for the day that a white guy breaks the color barrier in the NBA.
    Pete Maravich did it!! 😉

    He was Jordan BEFORE Jordan was dribbling on anything but his shirt!!
  13. Standard memberPocketKings
    Banned from edits
    Grammar dyslexic
    Joined
    20 May '05
    Moves
    11372
    19 Apr '09 00:33
    Originally posted by shortcircuit
    Pete Maravich did it!! 😉

    He was Jordan BEFORE Jordan was dribbling on anything but his shirt!!
    The barrier has been rebuilt and solidified. It needs to be broken again
  14. Joined
    03 Nov '07
    Moves
    701
    19 Apr '09 04:44
    Isn't it wonderful to be able to look back generationally and belittle the courage of someone who, to break ground for others to follow, was willing to be a "nigger" in a white man's world. How easy it was for Mr. Robinson to travel through the south in isolation from his teammates; eating separately, using back entrances to public places, having to use separate and very unequal toilet facilities, having to, daily, appear in an arena where tens of thousands of "fans" as well as opposng players would taunt him with words I would not be allowed to use here. How easy it was. I cannot imagine why people make such a fuss about doing such easy things. I suggest the writer try accepting such a roll. Too bad he cannot ask Rosa Parks what she thought of Mr. Robinson. Or, for that matter, if the retrospective historian would have had the guts to demand, face to face, that the then complaing fans address the black ballplayer as Mr. Robinson. It's true, Jackie Robinson broke nothing; he only daily risked his life to lead and create a way for others of his race, to do what was already guaranteed by the Constitution.
  15. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
    Voice of Reason
    Joined
    28 Mar '06
    Moves
    9908
    19 Apr '09 14:02
    Originally posted by ersmedarb
    Isn't it wonderful to be able to look back generationally and belittle the courage of someone who, to break ground for others to follow, was willing to be a "nigger" in a white man's world. How easy it was for Mr. Robinson to travel through the south in isolation from his teammates; eating separately, using back entrances to public places, having to use s ...[text shortened]... eate a way for others of his race, to do what was already guaranteed by the Constitution.
    How is any of that different than what he would have expierienced on a daily basis anyway?

    He had to endure all of that crap from white people EVERY day anyway. He lived as any black man that had to deal with white folks, except he also played baseball sometimes.

    By the way, where exactly do you find me, "belittling" his courage?? I stated facts, you added your opinion. Until you can draw correct conclusions from the facts, keep your opinions to yourself.
Back to Top