1. Joined
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    13 Sep '09 18:58
    Any thoughts on Serena's outrage at the US Open?
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    13 Sep '09 19:12
    Originally posted by galveston75
    Any thoughts on Serena's outrage at the US Open?
    Sad display of thuggish behavior. She was right to be mad, but this does not justify threatening an official, f-bomb outburts and threatening racquet waving, especially when you already have a caution for breaking a racquet at end of first set. Game officials acted appropriately.
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    13 Sep '09 19:27
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Sad display of thuggish behavior. She was right to be mad, but this does not justify threatening an official, f-bomb outburts and threatening racquet waving, especially when you already have a caution for breaking a racquet at end of first set. Game officials acted appropriately.
    I agree with that. I still appreciate her tennis ability and still think she's the best womens player ever, maybe, but I think her attitude is getting out of hand at times. Maybe this will bring her back down to earth a little.
  4. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    13 Sep '09 19:48
    She should be taken to court for the threat.

    I dislike arrogant athletes.
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    13 Sep '09 20:27
    Originally posted by Seitse
    She should be taken to court for the threat.

    I dislike arrogant athletes.
    Court? Really! A fat fine, perhaps a suspension and a big rebuke from the USTA, but court? No prosecutor would touch that one. Tennis matters should be settled by the governing body. Arrogance is indeed a problem in many athletes. No disagreement there. However, for every Willaims sister there is a gracious Oudin, Wozniacki, etc. How about Juan Martin del Potro's humble post-game interview after trouncing Nadal? Now there's a class act! No one seems to have taught Serena manners. her press conf in which she pretended not to remember what she said was as disgraceful as her behavior, but probably smart since she probably had the 5th amendment in mind!
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    13 Sep '09 20:49
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Court? Really! A fat fine, perhaps a suspension and a big rebuke from the USTA, but court? No prosecutor would touch that one. Tennis matters should be settled by the governing body. Arrogance is indeed a problem in many athletes. No disagreement there. However, for every Willaims sister there is a gracious Oudin, Wozniacki, etc. How about Juan Martin d ...[text shortened]... graceful as her behavior, but probably smart since she probably had the 5th amendment in mind!
    Yes that was a great interview Juan Martin gave. Good for him...
  7. Donationbbarr
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    14 Sep '09 02:30
    Originally posted by galveston75
    Yes that was a great interview Juan Martin gave. Good for him...
    Rafa's post-match interview was also, as per usual, very classy. It's interesting that on the men's side every player in the top ten is uniformly respectful of each other and handles themselves well off the court. I think this has a lot to do with the precedent that Agassi set over the past decade.

    That said, it's still unclear whether Serena foot-faulted and, if she did, whether it was so close that the line judge should have erred on the side of caution. And why don't we have electronic reviews for foot-faults?
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    14 Sep '09 03:28
    Originally posted by Seitse
    She should be taken to court for the threat.

    I dislike arrogant athletes.
    she should be kicked off the pro tour
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    14 Sep '09 03:33
    Originally posted by bbarr
    Rafa's post-match interview was also, as per usual, very classy. It's interesting that on the men's side every player in the top ten is uniformly respectful of each other and handles themselves well off the court. I think this has a lot to do with the precedent that Agassi set over the past decade.

    That said, it's still unclear whether Serena foot-faulte ...[text shortened]... ve erred on the side of caution. And why don't we have electronic reviews for foot-faults?
    Because the technology is not yet available. I agree foot faults are too much of a judgment call when the linesman/woman is unsure. I think the call was questionable, but did not deserve a tirade of the magnitude exhibited.

    Indeed the men (tennis top ten) are generally classier, but on the women's side Oudin and Wozniacki were great, gracious and evidenced not being sore losers. Venus has always seemed the classier of the Williams sisters. However, in other sports there are abundant thugs/prima donnas: 85 and TO in football, ARod in BB, KObe in basketball, Zinedine Zidane in soccer. Men are no slouches when it comes to boorishness.
  10. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    14 Sep '09 06:21
    Originally posted by LWCchess
    she should be kicked off the pro tour
    Agreed.

    And stoned to death then 😛
  11. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    14 Sep '09 06:291 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Court? Really! A fat fine, perhaps a suspension and a big rebuke from the USTA, but court? No prosecutor would touch that one. Tennis matters should be settled by the governing body. Arrogance is indeed a problem in many athletes. No disagreement there. However, for every Willaims sister there is a gracious Oudin, Wozniacki, etc. How about Juan Martin d graceful as her behavior, but probably smart since she probably had the 5th amendment in mind!
    Yup, and I am going to tell you my reasons.

    There is a leeway within sports for toughness and the risks go with the discipline. For example, injuries, some rough talk, etc. However, when it goes beyond that, it becomes part of not only the sport but what it portrays to the spectators outside, e.g. kids who see athletes as role models.

    If a football player dives or injures another, for example, we've seen that measures are taken by the governing body of the discipline, but such issues are within the boundaries of the discipline, and the rule book contemplates them. However, death threats? C'mon.

    Maybe I am out of scope here because tennis is not my thing, but... McEnroe, for example, was all attitude and he exceeded himself sometimes, but did he threat a referee with "I am going to kill you"? If he did, then such behavior is within the traditions of the discipline, I guess, and I stand corrected.

    Last but not least, you and I discussed this already, I believe, regarding footballers doing coke or behaving like jerks in pubs and strip clubs. That would show the kids that when you dishonor the sport they love, then you pay for it. Moreover, I would like the assistant referee to make a buck or two in an out-of-court settlement from the Williams clan's pocket, lol 🙂
  12. Standard memberSwissGambit
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    14 Sep '09 06:43
    Originally posted by galveston75
    Any thoughts on Serena's outrage at the US Open?
    Seems this is nothing new for her. She also threatened Martinez-Sanchez at the French Open after M-S wouldn't admit that a ball had struck her forearm instead of the racket [thus giving M-S the game]. Something like "I'll get you in the locker room".
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    14 Sep '09 11:41
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Yup, and I am going to tell you my reasons.

    There is a leeway within sports for toughness and the risks go with the discipline. For example, injuries, some rough talk, etc. However, when it goes beyond that, it becomes part of not only the sport but what it portrays to the spectators outside, e.g. kids who see athletes as role models.

    If a football play ...[text shortened]... to make a buck or two in an out-of-court settlement from the Williams clan's pocket, lol 🙂
    You make really good points, but it won't happen because we have protected classes. Some are more equal than others. WE have reached a point where you get lots of slack if you're an athlete, politician, etc, especially if you also happen to be the right ethnicity. Indeed the example to children is terrible. Making money off the clan is doubtful since you would have to prove damages. Booted off the tour? Real doubtful. we will have to continue enduring the outbursts from thuggish athletes. Serena is a thug and a horrible example to kids.
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    14 Sep '09 14:081 edit
    One of the problems is that foot-faults are almost NEVER called. It seems like the sort of the thing that everyone would do a couple of times per game - especially when you're trying to be a little extra aggressive in the heat of battle. But you can go through entire tournaments without ever seeing one called.

    So here it is, on one of the most crucial points of the match for Serena, and out of the blue, she gets called for a foot fault that makes it 15-40 and gives Clijsters two match points. I can fully understand how Serena would be completely outraged. Why the $%^**&^ are they picking NOW to start calling foot-faults??

    That being said, athletes have to be able to restrain themselves. Bad calls are part of the game, and unless there's an official challenge system, you're not going to get the call changed. But you see it in all sports - bad calls are followed by intense arguments that invariably make grown men and women look like 5-yr olds. People need to regard bad calls the same as if it was a strange bounce or a freak play. They happen. Accept it. Move on. Lodge an official complaint after the match/game if it's still bothering you.

    Calling Serena a "thug" or demanding that some overworked judge's time should be wasted on hearing this case, is a tad extreme. I'm sure all of us have lost our temper and said stupid things. But I do hope that Serena stops trying to make excuses and makes an official apology for her behavior. It was embarassing.
  15. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    14 Sep '09 14:34
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    You make really good points, but it won't happen because we have protected classes. Some are more equal than others. WE have reached a point where you get lots of slack if you're an athlete, politician, etc, especially if you also happen to be the right ethnicity. Indeed the example to children is terrible. Making money off the clan is doubtful since yo ...[text shortened]... nduring the outbursts from thuggish athletes. Serena is a thug and a horrible example to kids.
    Sad but true. That's how the ball bounces.
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