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Culture Forum

  1. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    05 Sep '08 08:25
    Books and music.

    Malory's Morte d'Arthur -- you can feel the steel, taste the blood, smell the piss and vomit, and pass out into an erotic dream of the quim-quivering queen. Easy reading, too -- adopt (eg.) a Yorkshire accent and Bob's your uncle.
  2. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    05 Sep '08 09:41
    Top murder ballad:

    Bruton Town

    In Bruton town there lived a farmer
    Who had two sons and one daughter dear.

    One told his secrets to no other,
    but to his brother this he said,
    "I think our servant courts our sister,
    I think they have a mind to wed.
    I'll put an end to all their courtship,
    I'll send him silent to his grave."

    A day of hunting was prepared,
    Where only bush and briars grew.
    And there they did this young man murder,
    And in the brake his body threw.

    "Now welcome home, my dear young brothers,
    Our serving man, is he behind?"
    "We've left him where we've been a-hunting,
    "We've left him where no man can find."

    As she lay dreaming on her pillow,
    She thought she saw her own true love;
    She dreamt she saw him standing by her,
    She saw his coat was red with blood.

    "Don't weep for me, my dearest jewel,
    Don't weep for me nor care nor pine,
    For your two brothers killed me cruel-
    In such a place you may me find.

    "Rise up, my love, tomorrow morning,
    Go straightway to that brake you know,
    For there you'll find my body lying,
    Where only bush and briars grow."

    She went out early in the morning,
    And in the garden brake she stood
    And there she found her own dear jewel,
    All covered o'er in a gore of blood.

    She took a kerchief from her pocket,
    And wiped his eyes though he was blind.
    "Because he was my own true lover,
    My own true love and a friend of mine."

    Three days and nights she did sit by him,
    And her poor heart was filled with woe,
    Till cruel hunger crept upon her,
    And home she was obliged to go.
  3. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    05 Sep '08 10:07
    Add your favourites!
  4. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    05 Sep '08 11:39
    The rack.
  5. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    05 Sep '08 11:58
    Originally posted by Palynka
    The rack.
    Yo how much ya bench?

    I rack myself up.
  6. 05 Sep '08 12:31
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Books and music.

    Malory's Morte d'Arthur -- you can feel the steel, taste the blood, smell the piss and vomit, and pass out into an erotic dream of the quim-quivering queen. Easy reading, too -- adopt (eg.) a Yorkshire accent and Bob's your uncle.
    Chaucer. Almost anything by Chaucer.
    Karel ende Elegast, which is Middle Dutch.

    Richard
  7. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    05 Sep '08 12:39
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Chaucer. Almost anything by Chaucer.
    Karel ende Elegast, which is Middle Dutch.

    Richard
    Piers Plowman? Like John Bunyan on magic mushrooms?
  8. 08 Sep '08 07:50
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Piers Plowman? Like John Bunyan on magic mushrooms?
    Never read all of it - I could only find the first volume of a set of two.

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, of course, and Pearl et al., too.

    Elckerlijc is interesting, but doesn't speak to us today as it did when it was written. The Chanson de Roland (which I read in an English and in a Dutch translation; early French is a bit too much for me, I fear) does, though.

    Richard
  9. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    08 Sep '08 09:00
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Never read all of it - I could only find the first volume of a set of two.

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, of course, and Pearl et al., too.

    Elckerlijc is interesting, but doesn't speak to us today as it did when it was written. The Chanson de Roland (which I read in an English and in a Dutch translation; early French is a bit too much for me, I fear) does, though.

    Richard
    The Everyman version is more than adequate, unless you insist on reading all the variants.

    It is interesting how mediaeval texts can speak to us, often more so than modern works, I'm finding these days. Downhill since Shakespeare, in some ways ...

    The poet Douglas Oliver wrote a great Thatcher-era satire, "The Infant & The Pearl", modelled closely on Pearl both in terms of allegory and form. It's well worth a read.

    Early French spelling, with 'k' not 'qu', often resembles modern French text message spelling ... I can't read it because I don't know what it should sound like at all. Speaking of which can you recommend a spoken word version of Chaucer? There's bits and pieces of him and others all over the Internet (eg. modern and mediaeval (with American accent ) versions of Piers Plowman here: http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Piers-Plowman.html ) but I'd like to listen to the (in)complete Canterbury Tales in Middle English some time.

    Wouldn't mind finding something similar for Francois Villon, too. I need aural authority ...
  10. 08 Sep '08 12:54
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Speaking of which can you recommend a spoken word version of Chaucer?
    Not really - I'm not into spoken books at all.

    Richard
  11. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    09 Sep '08 00:04
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Books and music.

    Malory's Morte d'Arthur -- you can feel the steel, taste the blood, smell the piss and vomit, and pass out into an erotic dream of the quim-quivering queen. Easy reading, too -- adopt (eg.) a Yorkshire accent and Bob's your uncle.
    What's a quim-quivering queen? It sounds really hot.
  12. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    09 Sep '08 09:08
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    What's a quim-quivering queen? It sounds really hot.
    Guinevere. She was.
  13. 12 Sep '08 15:15
    There was a group in the early 80s: Men Without Hats--I thought they sounded very minstrel-ly and mideval-like
  14. 18 Sep '08 06:42 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by PinkFloyd
    There was a group in the early 80s: Men Without Hats--I thought they sounded very minstrel-ly and mideval-like
    Lets all do the Safety Dance!

    I seem to remember the video to that song being very medieval-like.
  15. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    19 Sep '08 07:44
    Mediaeval sex comedy ...

    "Dame Siriz & The Weeping Bitch"
    http://books.google.co.za/books?id=7Apt9d6aAUkC&pg=PA232&lpg=PA232&dq=%22dame+siriz+and+the+weeping+bitch%22&source=web&ots=tdQqN7ydCJ&sig=zdZdX1yIDHEWpzKkyXaAOL3X5XY&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result