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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Donation buckky
    Filthy sinner
    20 Feb '09 17:25
    For shear soul I give Ray Charles the gold star.
    For shear chops I give Charlie Parker the award.
    For going far beyond the human level Mozart get's the prise.
  2. Standard member ChronicLeaky
    Don't Fear Me
    20 Feb '09 20:12
    Originally posted by buckky
    For shear soul I give Ray Charles the gold star.
    For shear chops I give Charlie Parker the award.
    For going far beyond the human level Mozart get's the prise.
    The elder Bach and the elder Zappa.
  3. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    20 Feb '09 20:22
    J.S. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven
  4. 20 Feb '09 20:25
    Berry Manilow
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Feb '09 20:38
    Originally posted by badmoon
    Berry Manilow
    They said DEAD not LIVING dead
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Feb '09 20:39
    Originally posted by ChronicLeaky
    The elder Bach and the elder Zappa.
    So you are saying Dwezel is not a chip off the old man's block?
  7. Standard member StTito
    The Mullverine
    20 Feb '09 22:19
    ok I think I read the Post right this time, hands down Miles Davis, nobody changed music more times than he did.
  8. 20 Feb '09 22:37
    I can't choose between Beethoven and Lennon.
  9. 20 Feb '09 23:07
    Originally posted by buckky
    For shear soul I give Ray Charles the gold star.
    For shear chops I give Charlie Parker the award.
    For going far beyond the human level Mozart get's the prise.
    i cannot say who was greatest, only my favorite has to be Micheal Bloomfield, an outstanding musician! check out album Analine, he plays guitar, mandolin and organ,

    http://www.youtube.com/user/BuRnT53
  10. Standard member ChronicLeaky
    Don't Fear Me
    20 Feb '09 23:58
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So you are saying Dwezel is not a chip off the old man's block?
    I haven't heard very much of what Dweezil does. He's a good guitarist, but I don't know if he's the brilliant understander and creator of music that his father was. Frank did a vast range of things musically, he sucked every drop of possibility out of his ideas and he stretched the musicians who worked with him. To the extent that I'm qualified to judge it, his technical understanding of music was profound, and he seemed to grasp, if somewhat cynically, the mental effect that musical abstractions have. His music takes us to weird places that make us better people.
  11. Subscriber gregsflat
    William Penn's gaze
    21 Feb '09 02:01
    Dead musicians: So do you know the old joke about the student that keeps returning to Beethoven's grave because he thinks he hears music from the master, but it's all playing backwards........
  12. Standard member ChronicLeaky
    Don't Fear Me
    21 Feb '09 10:16
    Originally posted by gregsflat
    Dead musicians: So do you know the old joke about the student that keeps returning to Beethoven's grave because he thinks he hears music from the master, but it's all playing backwards........
    Decomposition?
  13. 21 Feb '09 21:20
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    J.S. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven
    Those would be my picks, too. May I add Schubert, Brahms, and Chopin? Schubert was actually the most prolific of all of them considering the age he died and he covered about every type of genre. I think he compsed over 4000 numbers. He was a boy tenor with the famed Vienna Boys' Choir as a child. I saw them perform in Tacoma, Washington in 1954, I believe. About 300 years after he was one of them, of course.
  14. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    21 Feb '09 22:25
    Originally posted by ale1552
    Those would be my picks, too. May I add Schubert, Brahms, and Chopin? Schubert was actually the most prolific of all of them considering the age he died and he covered about every type of genre. I think he compsed over 4000 numbers. He was a boy tenor with the famed Vienna Boys' Choir as a child. I saw them perform in Tacoma, Washington in 1954, I believe. About 300 years after he was one of them, of course.
    Schubert was incredibly shy, painfully so. Both he and Beethoven lived in Vienna at the same time. Beethoven was a giant in music, famous throughout the world, and he used to go regularly to this coffee house where he had a table reserved for him, It must have been great for the business because people would come from all over to meet Beethoven, who, because of his deafness, would communicate with his writing pads.
    Schubert came too, many times, and would sit in the opposite corner gazing at this great man, but he was too shy to go over and introduce himself. So the two never actually met.
    It's tragically sad.
  15. 22 Feb '09 04:51
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    Schubert was incredibly shy, painfully so. Both he and Beethoven lived in Vienna at the same time. Beethoven was a giant in music, famous throughout the world, and he used to go regularly to this coffee house where he had a table reserved for him, It must have been great for the business because people would come from all over to meet Beethoven, who, b ...[text shortened]... too shy to go over and introduce himself. So the two never actually met.
    It's tragically sad.
    Thanks for the bit of trivia....which I love! Schubert would compose a song and take it to trade for a loaf of bread. He was never a success during his short lifetime. History had recorded that he died of typhus, but I read not long ago that it was actually syphilis...the same thing that caused Beethoven's deafness....only it was the father's ailment, not his own. Those things were hush-hush when I was still young and learning about the masters. Sometimes I wish I had not been enlightened. Again....it may just be hearsay in Schubert's case. I mean, how would anyone know?