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Culture Forum

  1. 26 Apr '13 16:45
    I love the harpsichord but many dislike, some so intensely as to say the following: : The harpsichord sounds like two skeletons copulating on a tin roof." Sir Thomas Beecham. I for one love the harpsichord and could not conceive of music evolving the way it did without the plucky sounding instrument. It died a quiet death of sorts, although it is still so widespread in replaying music of the era. Hearing it live is so very lovely and sweet.
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    26 Apr '13 18:16
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    I love the harpsichord but many dislike, some so intensely as to say the following: : The harpsichord sounds like two skeletons copulating on a tin roof." Sir Thomas Beecham. I for one love the harpsichord and could not conceive of music evolving the way it did without the plucky sounding instrument. It died a quiet death of sorts, although it is still so widespread in replaying music of the era. Hearing it live is so very lovely and sweet.
    I love harpsichord, there is a folk musician, I forget his name now, but he plays Irish tunes on Harpsichord really well.
  3. 26 Apr '13 18:43
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    I love the harpsichord but many dislike, some so intensely as to say the following: : The harpsichord sounds like two skeletons copulating on a tin roof." Sir Thomas Beecham. I for one love the harpsichord and could not conceive of music evolving the way it did without the plucky sounding instrument. It died a quiet death of sorts, although it is still so widespread in replaying music of the era. Hearing it live is so very lovely and sweet.
    I don't dislike, and certainly as an instrument played with others, it is a fine instrument.

    As a solo instrument, I struggle more. I have no solo harpsichord pieces in my collection. You may recall I said one of my New Year's resolutions was to plug the more obvious gaps in my collection. A few days ago, I looked at Scarlatti and thought 'I really should' and then jumped over him.

    I think it is the fact that it is not touch sensitive that puts me off. It comes out a bit 'samey' compared to the piano.

    I am, of course, a complete philistine.
  4. 26 Apr '13 18:48 / 1 edit
    I apologise in advance.

    Movie music is noise... even more painful than my sciatica.

    Thomas Beecham


    A man after your own heart, eh scacchipazzo?

    Joking!!!!!!!!
  5. 26 Apr '13 20:52
    Originally posted by Rank outsider
    I apologise in advance.

    Movie music is noise... even more painful than my sciatica.

    Thomas Beecham


    A man after your own heart, eh scacchipazzo?

    Joking!!!!!!!!
    How'd you read my mind? Indeed I hate movie music even more than most movies and sound like Sir Thomas Beecham is a man after my own heart. But back to the harpsichord. Only knock certainly is the lack of dynamic range. That's why the piano overtook it entirely and eventually music moved on and abandoned the very concept of a continuo. I do love it in baroque opera during recitativo.
  6. 26 Apr '13 20:53
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I love harpsichord, there is a folk musician, I forget his name now, but he plays Irish tunes on Harpsichord really well.
    Please, please jog your memory. I'd love to listen to folk music on the harpsichord!
  7. 26 Apr '13 21:13
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Indeed I hate movie music even more than most movies and sound like Sir Thomas Beecham is a man after my own heart.
    Thomas Beecham was great - but what about the movie music of Bernard Herrmann?
  8. 26 Apr '13 21:37
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Thomas Beecham was great - but what about the movie music of Bernard Herrmann?
    He's a notable exception as is Korngold. I detest John Williams and the Williams wannabe's. I love his "Psycho Suite". I absolutely detest Disneyesque music oo any kind!
  9. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    27 Apr '13 09:36
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    But back to the harpsichord. Only knock certainly is the lack of dynamic range. That's why the piano overtook it entirely and eventually music moved on and abandoned the very concept of a continuo. I do love it in baroque opera during recitativo.
    Can you explain 'abandoned the very concept of a continuo'?
  10. 27 Apr '13 12:56
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Can you explain 'abandoned the very concept of a continuo'?
    "Basso continuo, though an essential structural and identifying element of the Baroque period, continued to be used in many works, especially sacred choral works, of the classical period (up to around 1800). An example is C. P. E. Bach's Concerto in D minor for flute, strings and basso continuo. Examples of its use in the 19th century are rarer, but they do exist: masses by Anton Bruckner, Beethoven, and Franz Schubert, for example, have a basso continuo part for an organist to play." I think that by the late nineteenth century a basso continuo played on keyboard, especially harpsichord had been abandoned as a background device; chord-harmonic functions have been taken up by instrument groupings instead excepting neo-Baroque music. I doubt it will ever come back in its original form.
  11. 27 Apr '13 22:12
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    I love the harpsichord but many dislike, some so intensely as to say the following: : The harpsichord sounds like two skeletons copulating on a tin roof." Sir Thomas Beecham. I for one love the harpsichord and could not conceive of music evolving the way it did without the plucky sounding instrument. It died a quiet death of sorts, although it is still so widespread in replaying music of the era. Hearing it live is so very lovely and sweet.
    its not for me. it reminds me of when the chipmunks cover proper songs.
  12. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    28 Apr '13 00:29
    I like the harpsichord on "China Doll" by the Grateful Dead on the 1974 album "From Mars Hotel".
  13. 29 Apr '13 21:57
    If its a harpsichord that plays on the Stranglers Golden Brown track, then i like it.
  14. 29 Apr '13 23:57
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    If its a harpsichord that plays on the Stranglers Golden Brown track, then i like it.
    Wow! Sir Thomas Beecham would really love that! LOL
  15. 30 Apr '13 11:27
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    If its a harpsichord that plays on the Stranglers Golden Brown track, then i like it.
    I believe it is a synthesised harpischord.

    Not sure what Beecham would have made of that.