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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    25 Aug '09 18:21
    Ok, on one hand we have people saying "buy american " is bad because it encourages protectionism.

    On the other hand we have people saying "buy local" is good because it encourages protection of the environment.

    These concepts cannot be BOTH correct. They are in direct opposition to one another.

    So, which one of you can give me a good answer?
  2. 25 Aug '09 18:25
    Buy the best product at the lowest price.
  3. 25 Aug '09 18:28
    bingo
  4. 25 Aug '09 18:32
    The idea of "buying american" or buying "any other country" may've made sense when products were entirely designed and produced within one country. Today, we mostly "buy world".
  5. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    25 Aug '09 18:39
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    The idea of "buying american" or buying "any other country" may've made sense when products were entirely designed and produced within one country. Today, we mostly "buy world".
    So you disagree with the concept of "buy local" then?
  6. 25 Aug '09 19:04 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by uzless
    So you disagree with the concept of "buy local" then?
    I don't really have a position on it.

    I can see getting a certain satisfaction from buying local -- It kind of goes back to an old-fashioned marketplace where you knew the names of all the people you bought stuff from -- instead of going to some big box superstore and buying from some faceless corporate behemoth.

    But the old-fashioned marketplace doesn't really exist anymore. The local producer is probably just a corporate behemoth whose headquarters are near where you live.
  7. Standard member StTito
    The Mullverine
    25 Aug '09 19:10
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    I don't really have a position on it.

    I can see getting a certain satisfaction from buying local -- It kind of goes back to an old-fashioned marketplace where you knew the names of all the people you bought stuff from -- instead of going to some big box superstore and buying from some faceless corporate behemoth.

    But the old-fashioned marketplace do ...[text shortened]... cal producer is probably just a corporate behemoth whose headquarters are near where you live.
    In Portland Or. we have many farmers markets were I have either visited the farms or had a friend do so, both for meat and veggies. I know we are not the norm compared to many cites, but it proves it can be done in states with enough water and decent soil.
  8. 25 Aug '09 19:14
    Originally posted by uzless
    Ok, on one hand we have people saying "buy american " is bad because it encourages protectionism.

    On the other hand we have people saying "buy local" is good because it encourages protection of the environment.

    These concepts cannot be BOTH correct. They are in direct opposition to one another.

    So, which one of you can give me a good answer?
    Buy what is cheaper and better let the free maket decide.
  9. Standard member StTito
    The Mullverine
    25 Aug '09 19:24
    Originally posted by whodey
    Buy what is cheaper and better let the free maket decide.
    Unless you want your city to be livable and prosperous.
  10. 25 Aug '09 19:28
    Originally posted by StTito
    Unless you want your city to be livable and prosperous.
    Ok then, I guess you have to buy over priced crappy merchandise to be able to live in a livable and prosperous city. My bad.
  11. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    25 Aug '09 19:35
    Originally posted by StTito
    Unless you want your city to be livable and prosperous.
    Basic economics though tells us that restricting your purchases to only a certain area will lead to a recession. If EVERYONE only bought things from their local area, there would be goods and services that you would no longer be able to purchase.

    In short, "buy local" is a protectionist measure.

    How do we overcome this paradox?
  12. Standard member StTito
    The Mullverine
    25 Aug '09 19:37
    Originally posted by whodey
    Ok then, I guess you have to buy over priced crappy merchandise to be able to live in a livable and prosperous city. My bad.
    No, the free market does still work in the local level. I don't know about were you live, but the local meat and veggies grown in my area taste better and fairly competitive in price.
  13. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    25 Aug '09 19:37
    Originally posted by whodey
    Buy what is cheaper and better let the free maket decide.
    This mentality causes significant environmental harm since the free market does not value the environment.


    How do we protect the environment if it does not enter the purchase decision process?
  14. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    25 Aug '09 19:42 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by StTito
    No, the free market does still work in the local level. I don't know about were you live, but the local meat and veggies grown in my area taste better and fairly competitive in price.
    If EVERYONE in your area bought their meat and veggies locally, then the people that are currently supplying you with your meat and veggies from out of town would lose customers and would go out of business.

    The only way to stop that from happening would be to convince the people that live in THEIR area to buy fruits and veggies from them. But then the people that are supplying those people would go out of business...etc etc etc.

    It's a big spiral.

    This wouldn't be a problem if every location was able to produce meat and veggies for their local population, but the reality is that on a global scale the land isn't suitable. So, in those areas, they produce other products and sell those to neighbouring cities/countries in order to get money to buy their meats and veggies from out of town.

    BUT, if everyone is only buying local, then these places don't have anyone to selll to...they have no customers!!

    So, again, what is the solution??
  15. 25 Aug '09 19:48 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by StTito
    In Portland Or. we have many farmers markets were I have either visited the farms or had a friend do so, both for meat and veggies. I know we are not the norm compared to many cites, but it proves it can be done in states with enough water and decent soil.
    I live in a country with extremely fertile and productive farmland, but most people simply buy packaged food at supermarkets. "Local food" is mostly a cultural phenomenon driven by people who are irrationally afraid of globalization.