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  1. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    20 Oct '11 21:41
    http://www.usworker.coop/node/427

    This is an update on the progress between the United Steel Workers and Spain's Mondragon Cooperative Corporations to join forces to build cooperative industries in the US based on the Mondragon model. The venture is still in its infancy, but it could have enormous impact for workers in the US (and elsewhere).

    The working classes around the world have nothing to look forward to in the current capitalist economy except continued economic insecurity and a falling standard of living. No change to that trend can be expected from the political system. The only way for workers to reverse that trend is to build economic democracy themselves and fundamentally alter the current corporate model...one industry at a time.

    There are currently a number of successful worker owned businesses in the US, but a USW - Mondragon venture would give and enormous boost to the process. The United Nations has declared 2012 to be the 'International Year of Co-operatives'. Hopefully that will be the beginning of the transformation of world's economies into predominantly co-operative ones.
  2. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    20 Oct '11 21:55
    Apparently this process is already underway in other countries. Mondragon has plants in 18 countries besides Spain.
  3. 20 Oct '11 23:16
    Originally posted by rwingett
    http://www.usworker.coop/node/427

    This is an update on the progress between the United Steel Workers and Spain's Mondragon Cooperative Corporations to join forces to build cooperative industries in the US based on the Mondragon model. The venture is still in its infancy, but it could have enormous impact for workers in the US (and elsewhere).

    The wor ...[text shortened]... e beginning of the transformation of world's economies into predominantly co-operative ones.
    So what is the premise exactly? Can you lay it out for us?
  4. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    20 Oct '11 23:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    So what is the premise exactly? Can you lay it out for us?
    It's about how worker owned businesses will be the agent for the transformation to a just society and how the USW - Mondragon venture could give that a big boost.

    That's the premise of this thread. The article is about the first tentative steps that have been taken so far in that direction.
  5. 21 Oct '11 00:02
    Originally posted by rwingett
    It's about how worker owned businesses will be the agent for the transformation to a just society and how the USW - Mondragon venture could give that a big boost.

    That's the premise of this thread. The article is about the first tentative steps that have been taken so far in that direction.
    Just imagine if the UAW had gotten together and bought Chrysler. Of course, then they might have had to work for a living.
  6. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    21 Oct '11 00:06
    Originally posted by dryhump
    Just imagine if the UAW had gotten together and bought Chrysler. Of course, then they might have had to work for a living.
    When they were at their heyday, the UAW should have bought failing automotive companies and turned them into worker owned cooperatives. Studebaker, Packard, AMC, and the rest. That would have laid the foundation for eventual worker emancipation. But no, they continued to maintain that "capital and labor were brothers." We see where that has gotten them.
  7. 21 Oct '11 00:08
    Originally posted by rwingett
    It's about how worker owned businesses will be the agent for the transformation to a just society and how the USW - Mondragon venture could give that a big boost.

    That's the premise of this thread. The article is about the first tentative steps that have been taken so far in that direction.
    So workers can exploit themselves?

    So when will government get their claws into them by offering them corporate welfare?
  8. 21 Oct '11 01:27
    Originally posted by rwingett
    http://www.usworker.coop/node/427

    This is an update on the progress between the United Steel Workers and Spain's Mondragon Cooperative Corporations to join forces to build cooperative industries in the US based on the Mondragon model. The venture is still in its infancy, but it could have enormous impact for workers in the US (and elsewhere).

    The wor ...[text shortened]... e beginning of the transformation of world's economies into predominantly co-operative ones.
    This isn't new. About two decades ago, a suburban Detroit Steel mill was bought by employees. It failed in a year or two as I recall.
  9. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    21 Oct '11 01:35
    Originally posted by normbenign
    This isn't new. About two decades ago, a suburban Detroit Steel mill was bought by employees. It failed in a year or two as I recall.
    Because it had no network of support. The more these projects happen, the more they'll form a mutually supporting network. Eventually they'll become the norm instead of the exception.
  10. 21 Oct '11 10:40
    Why are whodey and norm raging against worker owned companies? A worker owned company still has to compete in the market place, doesn't it?
  11. 21 Oct '11 10:44
    Originally posted by rwingett
    When they were at their heyday, the UAW should have bought failing automotive companies and turned them into worker owned cooperatives. Studebaker, Packard, AMC, and the rest. That would have laid the foundation for eventual worker emancipation. But no, they continued to maintain that "capital and labor were brothers." We see where that has gotten them.
    Even a worker owned business can't divorce labor and capital.
  12. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    21 Oct '11 10:58
    Originally posted by dryhump
    Even a worker owned business can't divorce labor and capital.
    It merges them.
  13. 21 Oct '11 12:31
    Originally posted by rwingett
    It merges them.
    It is a about time that labor actually puts their money where their mouth is.
    They will find out that the investors (even if it is company level) need to be compensated just like they do in regular businesses and that businesses have cycles. There will be layoffs and desires to keep costs including wages down (like in any other business). The only difference will be that owners normally care much more about their business than unionized workers so perhaps with more effort there can be better product and more profits.
  14. 21 Oct '11 15:38
    Originally posted by rwingett
    It merges them.
    Even you must see the inherent problem, though. Once a group of workers become owners, it is inevitable that they will eventually behave as owners.
  15. 21 Oct '11 15:52
    Originally posted by dryhump
    Even you must see the inherent problem, though. Once a group of workers become owners, it is inevitable that they will eventually behave as owners.
    but would you agree that's not neceassrily a bad thing?