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  1. SubscriberFMF
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    25 Feb '16 00:46
    nappy anywhere autumn barrister bill biscuit flat dummy dustbin estate-agent flyover bonnet boot caravan chemist crossroads cupboard cutlery drawing-pin ground floor holiday jam jug lift petrol post torch motorway underpants vest postcode pub tap ring-road roundabout shop spanner sweets timetable windscreen single return toilet chips crisps lorry luggage pavement

    trashcan silverware attorney realtor anyplace elevator fall thumbtack pacifier overpass wrench faucet shorts traffic circle apartment closet check trunk cookie hood diaper jelly vacation intersection trailer pitcher first floor drugstore undershirt sidewalk rest room candy windshield one-way zip-code round-trip mail potato chips flashlight beltway schedule bar truck store baggage fries gasoline freeway

    With British people exposed to American English much more than American people are exposed to British English [due to the potency and success of US culture through films and TV series, news etc.], and with most British people being used to using and hearing American words even where there are British alternatives available, would it be fair to deduce that your average British person has a somewhat bigger active vocabulary in spoken language than his or her American counterpart?
  2. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    25 Feb '16 03:02
    Years ago my partner and I wanted to hire a car in US.
    The hotel clerk kept repeating "You want to higher a car???"
    And finally "Oh you mean RENT a car!"
  3. Joined
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    25 Feb '16 05:57
    Originally posted by FMF
    [quote]nappy anywhere autumn barrister bill biscuit flat dummy dustbin estate-agent flyover bonnet boot caravan chemist crossroads cupboard cutlery drawing-pin ground floor holiday jam jug lift petrol post torch motorway underpants vest postcode pub tap ring-road roundabout shop spanner sweet ...[text shortened]... has a somewhat bigger active vocabulary in spoken language than his or her American counterpart?
    Does the average British person have an average American counterpart?
  4. SubscriberFMF
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    25 Feb '16 06:21
    Originally posted by JS357
    Does the average British person have an average American counterpart?
    Or take a sample of five, perhaps: a 25 year old manager of a three till burger bar, a 29 year old cashier in a small branch bank, a 34 year old primary school teacher with ten years' experience, a 44 year old train driver, a 48 physiotherapist in a public hospital. You will have all these people (with these jobs) and they will most likely be 'positioned' more or less the same within your society. 🙂
  5. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    25 Feb '16 07:14
    Originally posted by JS357
    Does the average British person have an average American counterpart?
    Do you mean "white man van" vis-á-vis "redneck"? I didn't get the question.
  6. SubscriberKewpie
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    25 Feb '16 07:28
    Australian English is much closer to British than American, even though we're affected by Hollywood as much as anyone else. I translate American automatically in my head but when I speak or write it's rarely American words that I choose. My younger contacts use all varieties seemingly without thinking about it, but advertisers only use American words in American-sourced ads (e.g. McDonalds).
  7. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    25 Feb '16 08:26
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Do you mean "white man van" vis-á-vis "redneck"? I didn't get the question.
    I meant "white van man". Sorry, those Brits are weird.
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    25 Feb '16 10:22
    Originally posted by Seitse
    I meant "white van man". Sorry, those Brits are weird.
    "White Van Man" only exists as a road based phenomenon probably a New York taxi (cab) driver would be a better fit for comparison.
    We prefer the term 'eccentric' to 'weird'.
  9. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    25 Feb '16 10:27
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    "White Van Man" only exists as a road based phenomenon probably a New York taxi (cab) driver would be a better fit for comparison.
    We prefer the term 'eccentric' to 'weird'.
    Eccentric is too kind, you colonialist dentistry renegades.
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    25 Feb '16 10:34
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Eccentric is too kind, you colonialist dentistry renegades.
    Being too kind is probably one of our more civilised eccentricities as apposed to the one where we like to chase and kill small furry animals for pleasure. 😳
  11. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    25 Feb '16 11:03
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    too kind
    You clearly have never been to a pub in Birmingham at 11.00 p.m. on a Friday
  12. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    25 Feb '16 11:04
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    "White Van Man" only exists as a road based phenomenon probably a New York taxi (cab) driver would be a better fit for comparison.
    We prefer the term 'eccentric' to 'weird'.
    Isn't "White-Van-Man" a generic term for wannabe millionaires? Self-employed tradies
    who don't give a damn about anyone - including other road-users? Not sure that
    translates to NY cabbie?!?!??!
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    25 Feb '16 16:48
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Isn't "White-Van-Man" a generic term for wannabe millionaires? Self-employed tradies
    who don't give a damn about anyone - including other road-users? Not sure that
    translates to NY cabbie?!?!??!
    I've only ever heard it used as a term of abuse for being an ignorant twot on the road, I think New York cabbies have a similar reputation. As for wanna be millionaires, not really synonymous with driving a van I wouldn't have thought, but hey I've been wrong many times before.
  14. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    25 Feb '16 17:19
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    I've only ever heard it used as a term of abuse for being an ignorant twot on the road, I think New York cabbies have a similar reputation. As for wanna be millionaires, not really synonymous with driving a van I wouldn't have thought, but hey I've been wrong many times before.
    I thought it was for working class chavs.
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    25 Feb '16 17:42
    Originally posted by FMF
    [quote]nappy anywhere autumn barrister bill biscuit flat dummy dustbin estate-agent flyover bonnet boot caravan chemist crossroads cupboard cutlery drawing-pin ground floor holiday jam jug lift petrol post torch motorway underpants vest postcode pub tap ring-road roundabout shop spanner sweet ...[text shortened]... has a somewhat bigger active vocabulary in spoken language than his or her American counterpart?
    I think you have both an inferiority and a superiority complex.
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