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  1. SubscriberFMF
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    01 Aug '16 12:29
    Originally posted by JS357
    "When the internet first got kicking, some scholars of democracy and civil society thought that online discussions could create what they called a "conversational democracy” [...] Researcher Itai Himelboim gathered eight million messages posted to 35 political and philosophical newsgroups—like alt.politics.usa—over a six-year period.
    Perhaps the democratization that the internet is bringing about (to whatever degree, or not, as the case may be) involves more than just things like newsgroups and message boards.
  2. SubscriberSuzianne
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    01 Aug '16 19:56
    Originally posted by FMF
    The extraordinary facility that the internet provides for dissemination of information, bringing women (and other stakeholders) affected by these issues together, giving them a voice and access to required target audiences, and allowing them to organize and take action to change their circumstances, has been fundamentally transforming and continues apace.
    Yes, but again I must stress that the internet is not a democracy.

    Not all voices are heard, nor all they able to be heard.

    Among those able to participate, it seems to work. Not so much for those who are not able (or willing) to participate. The "online community", even now, is still only a slice of ALL people.

    One might consider it an "oligarchy" of sorts. You have to be "in the club" for it to work for you.
  3. SubscriberFMF
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    01 Aug '16 23:07
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Yes, but again I must stress that the internet is not a democracy.

    Not all voices are heard, nor all they able to be heard.

    Among those able to participate, it seems to work. Not so much for those who are not able (or willing) to participate. The "online community", even now, is still only a slice of ALL people.

    One might consider it an "oligarchy" of sorts. You have to be "in the club" for it to work for you.
    I am not arguing that the internet is a democracy. I am arguing that it contributes positively to it in the ways I described. As for the particular issue I touched upon, I see women who are poor or marginalized - domestic workers, factory workers, victims of domestic violence, women with disabilities - all getting involved - accessing information, being heard, organizing, affecting change - and benfitting from the facility the internet provides. This stuff is the nuts and bolts of better democracy. The word "oligarchy" doesn't fit what I'm seeing. Not at all.
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