1. Joined
    29 Oct '06
    Moves
    7703
    17 Jan '07 13:39
    I would be thinking longer term for an opening that has withstood the scrutiny of GMs and is popular at the highest level. (Less chance of having to change in the future.) For mere mortals, like myself, who have a full time job to keep us occupied the time for studying chess can be limited.

    Do you want to improve your over the board play or just correspondance chess?

    If the latter I would suggest choosing whichever opening gives you a position you like as you can always refer to books. If the former, I would suggest a mainline variation that has a good reputation at grandmaster level. My thinking is that slightly offbeat variations exist because they are not as sound as other lines. As you improve and play stronger and stronger players they will know how to counter your lines and you may well need to rethink you repetoire from scratch. Whereas the chances of this happening with a mainline (that has stood up to the scrutiny of GMs) is much less.

    I used to play the Alekhine's and Benko as my 2 main openings for black. I found with the Alekhine's my opponent would have more space and I would get more and more squashed. I liked the Benko as the plan was easy to remember but found that white's passed a pawn would be my undoing. Consequently, I switched to the Sicilian and the Budapest. I have found that whereas the Sicilian is still going strong that the Budapest has limitations and so I am in the process of switching to the Nimzo-Indian/Queens Indian.

    My personal aim is to improve my over the board play and would hope the repetoire I develop now will continue to serve me for many years to come. At the level I play now, the lesser lines would probably be fine, but the thought of having to change again in the future (if I'm fortunate enough to improve!) is enough to encourage me to try and make the correct choice now.

    Good luck with the system you do choose!
  2. Seattle
    Joined
    30 Jan '06
    Moves
    26370
    17 Jan '07 14:24
    *sends a calming, quiet whisper*: use the dutch
  3. Standard memberrotk
    Orc slayer
    Gondor
    Joined
    20 Jan '06
    Moves
    15582
    17 Jan '07 18:37
    Originally posted by !~TONY~!
    Sack the c-pawn! The fianchetto variation isn't boring if Black doesn't want it to be. You can play the crazy lines with ..e5, exd4, ..a6 and ..b5! And just get nuts on him.

    Cms, the KID is probably the most uncomprosing and aggressive variation Black's got. Check out the classical lines where Black closes the game with ..f4 and just attacks...Check out ...[text shortened]... to an endgame, and then sometimes wins! Check out the four pawns attack! Wely and Shirov! 😀
    I've just saw that line while reading secerts of chess sratgey, I'm looking at it, but am not ready for OTB play.

    four pawns attack is crazy, Game 2911865 after such good play I throw it away. not going to happen in my other game though
  4. Joined
    14 Jul '06
    Moves
    20541
    17 Jan '07 18:492 edits
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    White is so much better in this diagram, why would you want to head for this position?
    [fen]r2q1rk1/pbpnnpbp/1p1pp1p1/8/2BPPB2/2N2N2/PPPQ1PPP/R3R1K1 w - - 0 10[/fen]
    At first glance, yes - white has put his pieces on their most natural developing/attacking squares.
    But what does he do next? Black can nudge his pawns & I guarantee you white will have to be very careful indeed not to be the victim of the hippopotamus' counter-attack.
    The key is the double fianchetto of the bishops & the coverage of the 2 centrally placed knights.
    It throws all normal opening theory for white completely out of the window.

    Hardly the most thrilling strategy black could employ, but against 1.d4 it can be fun.

    Send the odd message to your opponent during the moves such as 🙂 or 😉 - nothing too pee-taking.

    Obviously.
  5. Joined
    29 Jul '06
    Moves
    2414
    18 Jan '07 02:18
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    To attack the e-Pawn.
    attack what e-pawn????

    and e5 was playable without Nbd7

    maybe it's just an obscure line I don't know
  6. Joined
    29 Jul '06
    Moves
    2414
    18 Jan '07 02:21
    Originally posted by !~TONY~!
    Sack the c-pawn! The fianchetto variation isn't boring if Black doesn't want it to be. You can play the crazy lines with ..e5, exd4, ..a6 and ..b5! And just get nuts on him.

    Cms, the KID is probably the most uncomprosing and aggressive variation Black's got. Check out the classical lines where Black closes the game with ..f4 and just attacks...Check out ...[text shortened]... re's a fun game and Gallagher's Suggested Improvement in the Classical to wet your whistle:
    I have personally never faced the 4 pawns attack in my life before

    agreed, sack the c pawn

    you could say that the fianchetto variation isn't boring if Black goes crazy, which would make cms happy, but I (an Accelerated Dragon player) personally don't mind boring and the 1/2-1/2
  7. Joined
    02 Feb '06
    Moves
    8557
    18 Jan '07 02:33
    Originally posted by YUG0slav
    I have personally never faced the 4 pawns attack in my life before

    agreed, sack the c pawn

    you could say that the fianchetto variation isn't boring if Black goes crazy, which would make cms happy, but I (an Accelerated Dragon player) personally don't mind boring and the 1/2-1/2
    I don't think I'd mind facing it. I'll give it a chance - although I'm not giving up on the Benko, especially against higher rated players who tend to play d5, because I'm more familiar with the positions. We'll see how things go with the KID though.
  8. Joined
    02 Feb '06
    Moves
    8557
    18 Jan '07 02:58
    Originally posted by c guy1
    *sends a calming, quiet whisper*: use the dutch
    If the KID doesn't work out, I'll give it a try. 🙂
  9. Joined
    02 Feb '06
    Moves
    8557
    18 Jan '07 03:13
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    If the KID doesn't work out, I'll give it a try. 🙂
    Ok, here's my not-so-long awaited first game with the KID. It's not particularly well played, and my opponent decided to go ahead and sac a pawn with 5.e5 which really threw me off, but I got the point anyway. It was a 10-0 btw.


    [Event "Rated game, 10m + 0s"]
    [Site "Main Playing Hall"]
    [Date "2007.01.17"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Acrux1"]
    [Black "CMSMaster"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "E70"]
    [WhiteElo "1141"]
    [BlackElo "1256"]
    [PlyCount "76"]
    [EventDate "2007.01.17"]
    [TimeControl "600"]

    1. d4 {2} Nf6 {2} 2. c4 {2} g6 {1} 3. Nc3 {8} Bg7 {1} 4. e4 {3} d6 {1} 5. e5 {6
    } dxe5 {12} 6. dxe5 {2} Nfd7 {1} 7. e6 {29} fxe6 {3} 8. Bd2 {18} O-O {3} 9. Nf3
    {20} Nf6 {36} 10. Be2 {16} Bd7 {28} 11. O-O {7} a6 {11} 12. Qb3 {63} Qc8 {33}
    13. Ng5 {16} h6 {8} 14. Nge4 {20} Nxe4 {4} 15. Nxe4 {2} Bc6 {12} 16. Bf3 {23}
    Nd7 {11} 17. Bc3 {25} Nf6 {8} 18. Rfe1 {14} Nxe4 {54} 19. Bxe4 {29} Bxe4 {36}
    20. Rxe4 {17} Bxc3 {15} 21. Qxc3 {14} b5 {12} 22. Rae1 {13} Rf6 {6} 23. c5 {32}
    Qd7 {19} 24. Rd4 {19} Qc6 {3} 25. Red1 {30} Raf8 {29} 26. Rd8 {4} Rxd8 {42} 27.
    Rxd8+ {6} Kf7 {1} 28. f3 {17} Qb7 {42} 29. c6 {17} Qb6+ {12} 30. Kf1 {13} b4 {
    16} 31. Qd3 {31} Qxc6 {18} 32. b3 {15} a5 {7} 33. Rd4 {22} Qc1+ {34} 34. Qd1 {8
    } Qxd1+ {2} 35. Rxd1 {1} Rf5 {4} 36. Rd7 {1} Rc5 {7} 37. Rd2 {30} Kf6 {4} 38.
    g4 {6} Ke5 {' . 5} 0-1
  10. Joined
    02 Feb '06
    Moves
    8557
    18 Jan '07 05:311 edit
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    Ok, here's my not-so-long awaited first game with the KID. It's not particularly well played, and my opponent decided to go ahead and sac a pawn with 5.e5 which really threw me off, but I got the point anyway. It was a 10-0 btw.


    [Event "Rated game, 10m + 0s"]
    [Site "Main Playing Hall"]
    [Date "2007.01.17"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Acrux1"]
    [Black "CM 6. Rd7 {1} Rc5 {7} 37. Rd2 {30} Kf6 {4} 38.
    g4 {6} Ke5 {' . 5} 0-1
    Here's another 10-0, one thing that I must admit I like about the KID is the ability to play it against any 1.d4 move that black plays (minus the Trompowsky). Anyhow, oddly enough white played that e5 move again (though in a different setup) is this something you guys see very often? I'll show you the game so you can see what I'm talking about....


    [Event "Rated game, 10m + 0s"]
    [Site "Main Playing Hall"]
    [Date "2007.01.17"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "James3"]
    [Black "CMSMaster"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [EventDate "2007.01.17"]
    [TimeControl "600"]

    1. d4 {3} Nf6 {3} 2. e3 {5} g6 {1} 3. Nc3 {4} Bg7 {1} 4. e4 {1} d6 {2} 5. e5 {
    14} dxe5 {7} 6. dxe5 {1} Qxd1+ {1} 7. Nxd1 {3} Nfd7 {1} 8. e6 {5} fxe6 {2} 9.
    g3 {7} O-O {2} 10. Bh3 {1} Nf6 {6} 11. Nf3 {10} c5 {3} 12. O-O {3} b6 {3} 13.
    Re1 {2} Bb7 {7} 14. Bxe6+ {15} Kh8 {4} 15. Nh4 {6} Nc6 {19} 16. c3 {13} Rad8 {
    11} 17. Bb3 {11} Rfe8 {13} 18. Ba4 {5} e5 {4} 19. Ne3 {11} e4 {26} 20. Nhg2 {39
    } Re6 {6} 21. Nf4 {8} Red6 {4} 22. b3 {25} Ne5 {12} 23. Kg2 {23} Nd3 {3} 24.
    Nxd3 {28} exd3+ {6} 25. Kg1 {15} d2 {2} 26. Rd1 {3} dxc1=Q {6} 27. Rdxc1 {4}
    Bh6 {16} 28. Re1 {19} Nd5 {35} 29. Ng4 {11} Nxc3 {28} 30. Ne5 {22} Kg7 {18} 31.
    Ng4 {31} Nxa4 {4} 32. bxa4 {8} Bf3 {20} 33. Re7+ {23} Kf8 {3} 34. Rae1 {38}
    Bxg4 {8} 35. Rxh7 {7} Bg7 {11} 36. Re4 {12} Bf3 {6} 37. Rf4+ {4} Rf6 {12} 38.
    Rxf6+ {15} Bxf6 {2} 39. h4 {0} Rd1+ {4} 40. Kh2 {1} Rh1# {
    (Lag: Av=0.58s, max=2.5s) 2} 0-1
  11. Standard memberrotk
    Orc slayer
    Gondor
    Joined
    20 Jan '06
    Moves
    15582
    18 Jan '07 18:10
    I've never had played against e5 like that, ussaully I lure them into playing e5 by not pushing d6, my only game where he took the bait I lost, because of a blunder, but otherwise I had much better position Game 2728269
  12. Joined
    22 Aug '06
    Moves
    359
    18 Jan '07 19:40
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    At first glance, yes - white has put his pieces on their most natural developing/attacking squares.
    But what does he do next? Black can nudge his pawns & I guarantee you white will have to be very careful indeed not to be the victim of the hippopotamus' counter-attack.
    The key is the double fianchetto of the bishops & the coverage of the 2 centra ...[text shortened]... sage to your opponent during the moves such as 🙂 or 😉 - nothing too pee-taking.

    Obviously.
    In his 1966 World Championship Match against Tigran Petrosian, Boris Spassky played the above setup with Black twice - and drew both times!
  13. Joined
    22 Aug '06
    Moves
    359
    18 Jan '07 19:431 edit
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    Treat 1.d4 with the utter contempt it deserves. They want a plodding, strategic game, then fine!
    [fen]r2q1rk1/pbpnnpbp/1p1pp1p1/8/2BPPB2/2N2N2/PPPQ1PPP/R3R1K1 w - - 0 10[/fen]
    In his 1966 World Championship match with Tigran Petrosian, Boris Spassky played the above Black setup twice - and drew both games!
  14. Joined
    29 Jul '06
    Moves
    2414
    19 Jan '07 00:45
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    Ok, here's my not-so-long awaited first game with the KID. It's not particularly well played, and my opponent decided to go ahead and sac a pawn with 5.e5 which really threw me off, but I got the point anyway. It was a 10-0 btw.


    [Event "Rated game, 10m + 0s"]
    [Site "Main Playing Hall"]
    [Date "2007.01.17"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Acrux1"]
    [Black "CM ...[text shortened]... 6. Rd7 {1} Rc5 {7} 37. Rd2 {30} Kf6 {4} 38.
    g4 {6} Ke5 {' . 5} 0-1
    the whole point of d6 is that white can't push that e pawn right off the bat, 6. ...Qxd1+ yields =+
  15. Joined
    02 Feb '06
    Moves
    8557
    19 Jan '07 01:15
    Originally posted by YUG0slav
    the whole point of d6 is that white can't push that e pawn right off the bat, 6. ...Qxd1+ yields =+
    Yeah, I saw that suggestion by F9, and the second time e5 was tried against me I played 6.Qxd1+.
Back to Top