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  1. Standard member csw
    18 Jan '08 11:45
    He apparently was stark raving mad, but it was his participation in the 1972 world championship that caused me to learn the game.

    --csw
  2. 18 Jan '08 11:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by csw
    He apparently was stark raving mad, but it was his participation in the 1972 world championship that caused me to learn the game.

    --csw
    I think BF was not only the strongest player in the world at that time, he was also the one who got US to be interested in chess (again).
  3. 18 Jan '08 11:53
    However, now all the threads should stop about him coming back to the game....but I doubt it though
  4. 18 Jan '08 12:05
    His death truly is sad news. At least we have his games and his book to help us to hold on to the memories. Rest in peace, Bobby.
  5. 18 Jan '08 12:07
    May Bobby live forever in chess lovers'hearths
  6. 18 Jan '08 12:09
    Where are you guys reading he died?
  7. 18 Jan '08 12:11
    Originally posted by Leaadas
    Where are you guys reading he died?
    some local news site citing BBC citing some Iceland radio...
  8. 18 Jan '08 12:12
    A pity he didn't die ten years ago when he still had an ounce of dignity.
  9. 18 Jan '08 12:20 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Leaadas
    Where are you guys reading he died?
    Just been reported on Channel 4 midday news. Apparently he had been ill for some time; he certainly seemed to have neglected himself. My feeling is one of great sadness, more I suppose for the fact that arguably the greatest ever chess genius lost his mind to become a demented anti-semite than his passing, since I doubt if he had anything more worthwhile to contribute to the world of chess. Fischer was by far the greatest influence on my chess when I was learning the game as a kid and young man, to the extent I was almost a Fischer clone for a while, playing all of his openings (Najdorf, King's Indian, Grünfeld etc). Just imagine what he might have achieved (and contributed to chess) if he hadn't lost his mind.
  10. 18 Jan '08 12:31
    I missed the boom in interest in chess that occurred after Fischer won the World Championship in 1972 as I didn't start playing until 1980. However I experienced the aftermath, with chess ability being well respected at school, book shops having a section dedicated to chess, chess clubs attracting more than half a dozen members.

    Perhaps he wouldn't have remained such a legend if he had actually stuck around and defended his title against Karpov in 1975. If Fischer had lost that match it would have definitely taken something away from his godlike status amongst us players.
  11. 18 Jan '08 12:48
    A flawed genius, alas we are all flawed, but not geniuses.
  12. 18 Jan '08 13:00
    RIP Bobby Fischer
  13. 18 Jan '08 13:12
    As I've read in some site: he lived as much years as there are squares in the chessboard.
  14. 18 Jan '08 13:14
    64 years old, cut down in the full flower of his manhood.
  15. 18 Jan '08 13:17
    RIP Bobby Fischer.