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  1. 12 May '11 05:42
    2011 Candidates Match in Kazan, Russia: Quarter-Finals Analysis

    Gata Kamsky elected to play and win the US Championship in St. Louis, MO just weeks prior to facing the venerable Veselin Topalov in their quarter-finals match. Not so long ago, Kamsky lost to Topalov in a match, after which the Bulgarian Sulper-GM went on to contend for the World Championship Title against Viswanathan Anand. Back to the point, I thought it was interesting that Kamsky chose to play in the US Chmps instead of resting and preparing for his very important match with Topalov. Kamsky played excellently, winning their match with a final score of 2.5 – 1.5. However, the final game definitely brought some drama as Topalov was pressing very hard and nearly won to even the score and take the match to a play-off. Topalov played a series of inaccurate moves, and the steel nerves of Kamsky enabled him to hold the game and progress to the Semi-Finals.

    Coming in to the match between Boris Gelfand and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, my favorite was the experienced veteran from Israel due to his ample match experience. However, Mamedyarov has been playing well lately and is capable of toppling any opponent. In their match, the first two games were somewhat peaceful draws. In game 3, Mamedyarov launched a dangerous attack that was proven superficial by a series of defensive sacrifices by Gelfand. Gelfand went on to hold the draw with ease as white in game 4.

    My favorite matchup displayed the exceptional creativity of Levon Aronian and the measured aggression of Alexander Grischuk. These are two of my all-time favorite players, as they both very attacking chess. However, they each played cautiously and drew their 1st four games, leading to an exciting rapid playoff. In a truly back-and-forth tactical slugfest, Grischuk managed to outmaneuver the #3 player in the world and move on to the Semi-Finals.

    Kramnik has seemed somewhat out of sorts lately, without many top finishes in recent months/events. Radjabov is an extremely dangerous opponent for any player in the world, however he was simply unable to create the kind of dynamic positions he requires to beat extremely solid and technical players like Kramnik. 4 draws in regulation moved the match to overtime, where another 4 consecutive draws ensued. Then things became interesting as Radjabov finally broke through with a win. Kramnik won his next game to stay alive, and then sealed the match with a further 2 wins – showing his class and fighting spirit as a former World Champion.

    Extensive Video Analysis of the Quarterfinal matches is available at http://www.onlinechesslessons.net

    Semi-Finals starting on May 12th

    Gata Kamsky (USA) will face Boris Gelfand (ISR), a very tough match to predict. I believe Kamsky will win with 2.5 – 1.5 in regulation time, grinding Gelfand down in an endgame as black in a Slav Defense to move on to the Finals. On the other side of the Semi-Finals, we will see top Russians Vladimir Kramnik and Alexander Grischuk battle for a spot in the Finals. Although Grischuk must be feeling red-hot after an extremely tough victory against Aronian, I’ve got to pick the ice-cold veins and thorough match experience of former world champ Vladimir Kramnik. I’ve got Kramnik winning the match after 4 draws in regulation, 2 initial draws in tiebreaker followed by a surprising sacrificial victory and solid draw to seal the deal. It will certainly be interesting to watch the Semi-Finals action unfold!
  2. 12 May '11 07:18
    Originally posted by WillStewartNM
    2011 Candidates Match in Kazan, Russia: Quarter-Finals Analysis

    Gata Kamsky elected to play and win the US Championship in St. Louis, MO just weeks prior to facing the venerable Veselin Topalov in their quarter-finals match. Not so long ago, Kamsky lost to Topalov in a match, after which the Bulgarian Sulper-GM went on to contend for the World Cham ...[text shortened]... draw to seal the deal. It will certainly be interesting to watch the Semi-Finals action unfold!
    solid and technical players like Kramnik ? quick question,

    whats a technical player?
  3. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    12 May '11 09:55
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    solid and technical players like Kramnik ? quick question,

    whats a technical player?
    Speaking for myself I'd say a technical player is one who tries to slowly suffocate his opponent's pieces and gain space. An accumulator of small advantages as herr Steinetz might have said. Others' opinions may differ.
  4. 12 May '11 10:26
    Originally posted by ketchuplover
    Speaking for myself I'd say a technical player is one who tries to slowly suffocate his opponent's pieces and gain space. An accumulator of small advantages as herr Steinetz might have said. Others' opinions may differ.
    mmm, interesting, i just wondered.
  5. 12 May '11 10:27
    "whats a technical player?"

    A good question Mr McRobbie.

    The word 'technical' when applied to a chess player is actually
    the joining together of two words to form one word.

    'Word Morphing' as it is known in the trade.

    'Tech-' is from from Texas and '-nicol' is a nickel, slang for the American 5 cent coin.

    So a Technical Chess Player is a Texan who plays for nickel and dimes.

    Petrosian was called a solid technical player.

    Another example of word morphing: 'Solid'.
    It comes from Sold-ID. they 'Sold' their 'ID'.

    Petrosian sold his ID moved to Texas and played for nickels and dimes.
    Ego: A solid technical player.

    Hope this helps clear things up.
  6. 12 May '11 10:40
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    "whats a technical player?"

    A good question Mr McRobbie.

    The word 'technical' when applied to a chess player is actually
    the joining together of two words to form one word.

    'Word Morphing' as it is known in the trade.

    'Tech-' is from from Texas and '-nicol' is a nickel, slang for the American 5 cent coin.

    So a Technical Chess Player is a ...[text shortened]... s and dimes.
    Ego: A solid technical player.

    Hope this helps clear things up.
    Howdy pardner, it certainly makes a hell'u'vah sense, crazier than a junk yard dawg
    after its been run over!
  7. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    12 May '11 20:40
    Both games were drawn today.
  8. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    13 May '11 00:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Howdy pardner, it certainly makes a hell'u'vah sense, crazier than a junk yard dawg
    after its been run over!
    Crazier than a road lizard, crazier than a bed bug, crazier than GP.
  9. 13 May '11 01:38
    im a little confused by all of the draws in this year's candidates matches. i understand that losing one game can be devastating, but it seems like taking it to the tiebreakers is going to make the luck element more evident. Grischuk played very passively against Kramnik today, almost begging for the draw. Maybe he feels his chances are better in the tiebreaker where he can mix it up against the ultra-solid positional style of Kramnik?
  10. 13 May '11 09:53
    Originally posted by WillStewartNM
    im a little confused by all of the draws in this year's candidates matches. i understand that losing one game can be devastating, but it seems like taking it to the tiebreakers is going to make the luck element more evident. Grischuk played very passively against Kramnik today, almost begging for the draw. Maybe he feels his chances are better in the tiebreaker where he can mix it up against the ultra-solid positional style of Kramnik?
    Grischuk is famous for his blitz strength...that's why he is fine with draws as white...
    Gelfand is most of the times a drawish player, Kramnik as well...



    bad for chess
  11. 13 May '11 11:47
    You can liken it to Football where the so called weaker team hangs
    on for the draw willing to take their chances in the penalty shoot - out.

    Not a bad ploy if you have confidence in your blitz play and
    carry with it a fearsome reputation.
    It may tempt the other player to go for a 50-50 win in the proper games
    when the position does not quite justify it.
  12. 14 May '11 12:55
    as I write the semi finals are both one all.
    Interesting match-ups.
    Gelfand is a very ordered correct player; the final fling of Soviet chess but relatively weak tactically and in time trouble. Kamsky needs to create unusual characteristics on ther board to prevail. His main strength is his strength: both physical and mental. Both will be keen to attempt to win in the original 4 games
    Close call.
    Kramnik Grischuk is much more interesting.
    Everybody knows K strengths and is very underestimated at quickplay/blitz.
    Grischuk is a very accurate and fast calculator and also a very strong engame player, especially queen and knight endings. Give him an advantage, he is very clinical in converting. His achilles heel is generating advantages in the first place: when sheer speed of thought isn't enough and complicated strategic positions is where Kramnik as an edge. I expect one Kramnik win and countless draws in this match unless it goes down to 3 minute plus games where anything could then happen.
    The winner of Grischuk v Kramnik will play Anand.

    Anand and Kramnik are clearly the worlds 2 best players.
    (ps Carlsen doesn't have a sound opening rep and Aronian is a very hard working and talented plonder with very strong nerves)

    Thoughts anyone? lol
  13. 14 May '11 21:45
    Originally posted by vipiu
    Grischuk is famous for his blitz strength...that's why he is fine with draws as white...
    Gelfand is most of the times a drawish player, Kramnik as well...



    bad for chess
    Gelfand plays great for win evry game in this tournament, just look his games. Today he was very close to win by black, but missed it
  14. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    14 May '11 22:07 / 1 edit
    I struggle with the notion that Gelfand is a relatively weak tactical player.

    Robbie- I think a technical player would generally mean someone who seeks to trade their middle game advantage into endgame victories. Dvoretsky's "Technique for the tournament player" is pretty much on that subject. Kamsky in many ways seems to be the most "technical" player in the candidates despite Kramnik's reputation. Just my .02 on that though.
  15. 15 May '11 09:55 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    I struggle with the notion that Gelfand is a relatively weak tactical player.

    Robbie- I think a technical player would generally mean someone who seeks to trade their middle game advantage into endgame victories. Dvoretsky's "Technique for the tournament player" is pretty much on that subject. Kamsky in many ways seems to be the most "technical" player in the candidates despite Kramnik's reputation. Just my .02 on that though.
    ok Nimzo, thats helpful, i get it now. A technical player is one who applies this technique, interesting. I always, feel robbed when that happens to me. Why should someone win just because they have better technique? Its almost an injustice. where is the creativity, the imagination? the taking of risks, calculated and otherwise? Meh, its machine like and monotonous. There should be some rule that your not allowed to win like that or you only get three quarters of a point and one and a half if you mate your opponent outright, with no pawn promotions.