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  1. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    03 Dec '10 03:19
    I thought i'd share this gem of a game. It all looks so natural, white goes up a pawn and skilfully simplifies the position in to a MASSIVE position advantage in the end game. Smyslov forces black to neutralise his own position and traps the opposing king on the 6th rank, all of that... with one rook!

  2. Standard member pdunne
    Badmaster
    03 Dec '10 14:09
    When and where was this played, and against whom?
  3. 03 Dec '10 15:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by pdunne
    When and where was this played, and against whom?
    Click on "Headers" below the game (or on "PGN" ), and it'll tell you. This was played in Groningen (in the Netherlands) in 1946, at the Staunton Memorial. This was the first major international tournament after World War II. Smyslov's opponent was Milan Vidmar.

    Richard
  4. 03 Dec '10 15:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by pdunne
    When and where was this played, and against whom?
    Edit. I'm too slow, this was answered whilst I was writing my post.
  5. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    03 Dec '10 15:17
    [Event "01, Staunton, Groningen NED"]
    [Site "01, Staunton, Groningen NED"]
    [Date "1946.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Vasily Smyslov"]
    [Black "Milan Vidmar"]
  6. Standard member pdunne
    Badmaster
    03 Dec '10 15:20
    Hah! Of course NOW the "Headers" link more or less jumps out of the screen at me! Thanks Richard.
  7. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    03 Dec '10 17:04
    Any comments on the game? I think whites play is about as close to faultless as you could hope. He makes it all look so easy! 🙄
  8. Standard member Exuma
    Anansi
    03 Dec '10 19:02
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    Any comments on the game? I think whites play is about as close to faultless as you could hope. He makes it all look so easy! 🙄
    I like that if on move 30 Black plays Kf4 its a mate in one - with that powerful rook!
  9. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    07 Dec '10 19:11
    What a great game. I think studying his games in depth is a great way to learn chess in general, but it is really a great way to learn endgames. It's fun, not work, when seen in the context of his games.

    The only down side is that he reached a point in his career where he would win a pawn or a pawn's positional equivalent, and the other guy would just resign, knowing it was hopeless, and leaving us with nothing to study except the notes!
  10. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    07 Dec '10 21:49
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    What a great game. I think studying his games in depth is a great way to learn chess in general, but it is really a great way to learn endgames. It's fun, not work, when seen in the context of his games.

    The only down side is that he reached a point in his career where he would win a pawn or a pawn's positional equivalent, and the other guy would just resign, knowing it was hopeless, and leaving us with nothing to study except the notes!
    I've recently started teaching and i am actually giving a lecture on this game tomorrow precisely because it is so instructive. It is an excellent example of deciding on a strategy and executing it (ie, white is a pawn up, simplify the position into a won ending).

    Also, there are some excellent individual moves, 8.Qh5 for example is an excellent use of an intermediary move. White weakens the black squares and then develops threats utilising the weakened squares. 18.Re8 is another, white allows the Queen exchange but continues to develop (black is still enjoying a lead in development after the earlier attacks on whites Queen). I think this move really makes a massive difference to whites cause. 20.Bf4 also, white has levelled in development and can only now seek exchanges, black is happy for BxN as it un-doubles his pawns so leaves his knight. White is patient and manoeuvres his knight to d2 before exchanging which wins the game on the spot. Logical, simple chess, executed brilliantly! Love this game 🙂
  11. Standard member iru
    12 Dec '10 09:37
    Can we find annotations to this game somewhere (like a book ot website)?
  12. 31 Dec '10 01:36
    This game was brought up in conversation last night.

    Is that game included by Smyslov in his My Best Games of Chess - 1935-1957?

    I committed the sin of sins by lending out my copy years ago.
    Never lend out chess books, you never see them again.
  13. 31 Dec '10 02:42
    Here's an interesting game in the same line from two years before the Smyslov game

  14. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    31 Dec '10 04:03
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    This game was brought up in conversation last night.

    Is that game included by Smyslov in his My Best Games of Chess - 1935-1957?

    I committed the sin of sins by lending out my copy years ago.
    Never lend out chess books, you never see them again.
    I couldn't tell you i'm afraid, have never read that one. Found it online 😉
  15. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    31 Dec '10 04:05 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Siskin
    Here's an interesting game in the same line from two years before the Smyslov game

    [pgn][Event "URS-ch13"] [Site "Moscow"] [Date "1944.05.29"] [Round "6"] [White "Boleslavsky, Isaak"] [Black "Tolush, Alexander V"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C64"] [PlyCount "138"] [EventDate "1944.05.21"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "17"] [EventCountry "URS"] [Source "Chess Kxb4 66. Nb1 Kb3 67. Kxg6 Kc2 68. Na3+ Kb3 69. Kf5 Kxa3 1-0[/pgn]
    9.Qh4 really makes a better try that 9.Bxe5 in the first game. Having looked at the whole game, you have to say white was rather lucky to win this one!