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  1. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 05:57 / 3 edits
    Over at Chess.com, I've been using an opening as white, that I wanted to know if there's a name for. If not, I think we should name it after me. 😉 The position is at move number six:


  2. 26 Nov '12 06:22
    I think this is the classical setup against hypermodern openings. Back in the days of Staunton and Steinitz, I think the knights went on f3 and c3 and the bishops on e3 and d3. Over time, this system lost popularity,but it seems very playable. 🙂
  3. 26 Nov '12 06:27
    I dont see any mate in two?
  4. 26 Nov '12 07:27
    have you played it on here? at RHP after the end of every game i think it tells you the opening you played. example in this game you played C46 Four knights Italian variation[gid]9660604 [/gid]
  5. 26 Nov '12 07:27 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by luke myster
    I dont see any mate in two?
    q h7, looking for q g8, but i guess its not forcing
  6. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    26 Nov '12 07:59
    Originally posted by vivify
    Over at Chess.com, I've been using an opening as white, that I wanted to know if there's a name for. If not, I think we should name it after me. 😉 The position is at move number six:


    [pgn][Date "????.??.??"]
    [Result "*"]
    [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]

    1.d4 c6 2.e4 g6 3.Nf3 f6 4.Nc3 Bg7 5.Bd3 h5 6.Be3 { I really l ...[text shortened]... 7 Nh6 17.Bxh6 Bxh6 18.Qh5 Bg7 { Black resigned, realizing I had mate in two. }
    *[/pgn]
    This reminds me of a lucky win from years back in a drunken state in a small coffee house


  7. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 15:10 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by luke myster
    I dont see any mate in two?
    Sorry, it was actually mate in three from that position:



    If Black's does give up his queen:



    Mate in two:

  8. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 16:55 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by paulbuchmanfromfics
    I think this is the classical setup against hypermodern openings. Back in the days of Staunton and Steinitz, I think the knights went on f3 and c3 and the bishops on e3 and d3. Over time, this system lost popularity,but it seems very playable. 🙂

    What's a hypermodern opening? Do you mean a modern-day, or a recent, currently trending style of opening?
  9. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 16:57
    Originally posted by tim88
    have you played it on here? at RHP after the end of every game i think it tells you the opening you played. example in this game you played C46 Four knights Italian variation[gid]9660604 [/gid]
    I haven't gotten a chance to play this opening yet, on RHP. Four knights, Italian variation? I'll look that up, thanks.
  10. 26 Nov '12 17:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vivify
    Sorry, it was actually mate in three from that position:

    [pgn][Date "????.??.??"]
    [Result "*"]
    [FEN "rn3k2/pp2qBb1/3pPp2/4p2Q/7p/2N4P/PPPP1PP1/R4RK1 w - - 0 1"]

    1.Nd5 { The only way for black to prevent mate in two, is by saccing the queen for white's pawn or bishop. If black doesn't: } 1...Qd8 2.Qh7 { No way to prevent mate. } ( 2.Qh7 )
    *[/pgn]

    hite had mate in two or three moves, which is why he resigned. }
    *[/pgn]
  11. Standard member kingshill
    Mr Ring Rusty
    26 Nov '12 17:43 / 1 edit
    What's a hypermodern opening? Do you mean a modern-day, or a recent, currently trending style of opening?[/b]
    Classical school of chess in the late 19th century favored occupation and control of the center with pawns.

    Nimzovitch and others in the HYPERMODERN SCHOOL of thought in the 1920s and 30s would cede the center and weaken, undermine and attack it with pieces from a distance.

    [This is a VERY simplified explanation..!!!]
  12. 26 Nov '12 18:06
    What's a hypermodern opening? Do you mean a modern-day, or a recent, currently trending style of opening?
    A hypermodern opening is one where one side doesn't put any pawns in the center (e4-d4-e5-d5). Instead, the hypermodern opening tries to attack the center from the flanks. The idea is let white build a big center. Attack it. Let white loosen himself defending it. Destroy it. And last, toss black's center pawns forward (White's have destroyed and nothing can oppose them.)!!

    Black's g6 and Bg7 is a good example of a hypermodern system.
    Black lets white get the pawns on d4 and e4, hoping to undermine the center later (with perhaps a c5 push).

    Hypermodern openings include the Reti or King's Indian Attack for white, the Modern/Pirc for black, Grunfeld, King's Indian Defense, Alekhine, Nimzo Indian, Queen's Indian, etc.

    Here's an example of the hypermodern strategy in action:



    Next, is one of my favorite games. I've posted this many times.
    Suttles (a grandmaster) made a career of virtually only playing g6 and Bg7 as his defense to everything! Here we see the master at work.

  13. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 18:12 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by KnightStalker47
    [pgn][Date "????.??.??"]
    [Result "*"]
    [FEN "rn3k2/pp2qBb1/3pPp2/4p2Q/7p/2N4P/PPPP1PP1/R4RK1 w - - 0 1"]

    1.Nd5 Nc6 {Where is the mate in 2 now?} 2.Qh7 Qxf7
    *[/pgn]
    I didn't include that, because it's not a logical move for black to do.

  14. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 18:39 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by paulbuchmanfromfics
    A hypermodern opening is one where one side doesn't put any pawns in the center (e4-d4-e5-d5). Instead, the hypermodern opening tries to attack the center from the flanks. The idea is let white build a big center. Attack it. Let white loosen himself defending it. Destroy it. And last, toss black's center pawns forward (White's have destroye 4 32.Rg1 Rg8+
    33.Kf1 Qb5+ 34.Rd3 Rxg1+ 35.Kxg1 1-0
    [/pgn]
    This is really cool. I'm now a fan of Suttles.

    Thanks so much for this. Hypermodern openings are truly unique, and the destruction to white's center is very hard to see coming.
  15. Standard member vivify
    rain
    26 Nov '12 18:53
    Originally posted by tim88
    have you played it on here? at RHP after the end of every game i think it tells you the opening you played. example in this game you played C46 Four knights Italian variation[gid]9660604 [/gid]
    I looked this up, and it doesn't seem at all to be the opening that I have:

    http://www.chess.com/opening/eco/C46_Four_Knights_Game_Italian_Variation

    My opening has both bishops and knights developed and protected, along with the center pawns taking control the center, and protected by both knights.