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  1. 02 Aug '07 08:25
    In over the board tournament Chess, is it mandatory to say 'Check' when checking your oponent?
  2. 02 Aug '07 08:35
    Originally posted by znsho
    In over the board tournament Chess, is it mandatory to say 'Check' when checking your oponent?
    No, and few players at higher levels bother.
  3. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    02 Aug '07 12:09
    Originally posted by znsho
    In over the board tournament Chess, is it mandatory to say 'Check' when checking your oponent?
    If your opponent doesn't know he is in check he shouldn't be playing the game.
  4. 02 Aug '07 12:59
    Originally posted by znsho
    In over the board tournament Chess, is it mandatory to say 'Check' when checking your oponent?
    In my club chess-playing experience (I never played scholastic chess), it's seldom announced in rated games. Experienced players know when they are in check and don't need to be told this. Some experienced players will even be insulted if the opponent announces check. It doesn't bother me, and I never say anything when my opponent says check. Usually, people who announce check are well-meaning beginners who don't know that they're not supposed to do it.

    About the only time that I'd consider announcing check would be if I were playing a beginner who I thought would have a hard time determining when he was in check. And of course, if your opponent is in check and starts to move a piece that doesn't get him out of check, then you have no choice but to quietly mention that he's in check.

    And yes, in more informal, friendly games, announcing check could be considered part of the "friendly banter", so it's less of a concern in those cases.
  5. 02 Aug '07 13:35
    Originally posted by Dragon Fire
    If your opponent doesn't know he is in check he shouldn't be playing the game.
    Indeed, in a tournament you don't say check, then hope your opponent doesn't see it, so after frittering away time he makes an illegal move and you can freak him out by telling him his king's threatened, making him think all over and use more clock time.
    it's an old indian trick
  6. 02 Aug '07 14:09 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Dragon Fire
    If your opponent doesn't know he is in check he shouldn't be playing the game.
    You might have a point, but here's a counter point. Everyone was once a beginner, and beginners often haven't developed the board vision to see checks most of the time. Rather than discouraging beginners from entering tournaments, I'm sure most tournament directors prefer to welcome beginners with open arms, even if they don't have good board vision yet. Beginners are often nervous and apprehensive about entering tournaments for the first time, and I don't think it's beneficial to make it harder on them. Better to make it a positive experience so they'll enter more tournaments later on. And I don't think most players mind having the beginners in the tournament, as long as they're well-behaved and not acting obnoxiously.
  7. Standard member TheQuinnOfAMS
    Chessplaya
    02 Aug '07 14:52
    In USCF rules if you make an illegal move with your King in a blitz game you can simply capture the opponent's King so saying check would be a blunder really.
  8. 02 Aug '07 14:59
    I would deliberately say check to wind up my opponent - especially if I was losing.
  9. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    02 Aug '07 15:22
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    You might have a point, but here's a counter point. Everyone was once a beginner, and beginners often haven't developed the board vision to see checks most of the time. Rather than discouraging beginners from entering tournaments, I'm sure most tournament directors prefer to welcome beginners with open arms, even if they don't have good board vision yet. Be ...[text shortened]... eginners in the tournament, as long as they're well-behaved and not acting obnoxiously.
    They generally won't be in the same section of the tournament as me.

    If, however, I play beginners of course I point these things out to them plus their clock and I even disregard touch move at times (I tell them they should move but don't enforce it). As you say the intention is to encourage them to play and I know that I can play like a patzer and still win so these concessions cost me nothing.
  10. 02 Aug '07 15:26
    Originally posted by TheQuinnOfAMS
    In USCF rules if you make an illegal move with your King in a blitz game you can simply capture the opponent's King so saying check would be a blunder really.
    Yep, you're right, blitz games only. For longer USCF time controls, the best penalty that can be extracted is getting two minutes added to your clock, only if the time control is sudden death, and only if your opponent hits his clock after making the illegal move.
  11. 02 Aug '07 15:44
    In a tournament, if the player does not say Check and the oponent does not notice the check, can the player TAKE the K and win? Or, MUST the player who gave the check inform the oponent of his / her 'illegal' move? If so, surely there must be some kind of penalty (e.g. time) for the oponent?

    It takes time to point out the error, most probably whilst the clock has been changed, AND, failing to move out of check is disruptive to the player giving the check.
  12. 02 Aug '07 15:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by znsho
    In a tournament, if the player does not say Check and the oponent does not notice the check, can the player TAKE the K and win? Or, MUST the player who gave the check inform the oponent of his / her 'illegal' move? If so, surely there must be some kind of penalty (e.g. time) for the oponent?

    It takes time to point out the error, most probably whilst the cl ...[text shortened]... been changed, AND, failing to move out of check is disruptive to the player giving the check.
    1. NO
    2. YES
    3. There's no time penalty for the person in check other than what he wasted while thinking, not noticing he was in check.

    When the player makes an illegal move you immediately punch your clock button and start his time, then inform him.
  13. 02 Aug '07 15:55
    Originally posted by znsho
    In a tournament, if the player does not say Check and the oponent does not notice the check, can the player TAKE the K and win? Or, MUST the player who gave the check inform the oponent of his / her 'illegal' move? If so, surely there must be some kind of penalty (e.g. time) for the oponent?

    It takes time to point out the error, most probably whilst the cl ...[text shortened]... been changed, AND, failing to move out of check is disruptive to the player giving the check.
    I could quote the USCF rules, but I suspect you probably play under slightly different rules. I was just wondering, does the UK play under unmodified FIDE rules, or does the UK have it's own national rules?
  14. 02 Aug '07 16:14
    Originally posted by Dragon Fire
    They generally won't be in the same section of the tournament as me.

    If, however, I play beginners of course I point these things out to them plus their clock and I even disregard touch move at times (I tell them they should move but don't enforce it). As you say the intention is to encourage them to play and I know that I can play like a patzer and still win so these concessions cost me nothing.
    The chess world needs more understanding people like you. My rating isn't very high, but I'd like to think I'm no longer a beginner. (I'd say I'm a novice.) I also try to be helpful to the beginners that I play, and I'm thankful that people were generally kind to me when I was struggling to develop my board vision. (Of course, I'm still developing it, but it's much better than when I started.)
  15. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    02 Aug '07 16:44
    In friendly games, I announce check, but not in tournament games. In fact, saying "check" is against the rules because you are not allowed to speak to your opponent other than to offer a draw or resign.