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  1. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    20 Apr '06 21:28
    If I understand the rules correctly, you must move a piece that you touch, but your move isn't complete until you hit your clock. If this is the case, I see two ways one could use this to one's advantage.

    1. You're sure you want to move a certain piece, but you're not sure where. You can put it on a prospective square to aid in your calculations. It's one less thing to visualize.

    2. You're sure you want to move a certain piece, but you're not sure where. You can put it on a prospective square, and wait for your opponent's reaction. Look at their face. Many people will move anyway if you forget to hit your clock, so you can even trick your opponent into revealing their responce to your prospective move.

    Is this legal?
  2. 20 Apr '06 21:33
    Originally posted by ark13
    If I understand the rules correctly, you must move a piece that you touch, but your move isn't complete until you hit your clock. If this is the case, I see two ways one could use this to one's advantage.

    1. You're sure you want to move a certain piece, but you're not sure where. You can put it on a prospective square to aid in your calculations. It's on ...[text shortened]... your opponent into revealing their responce to your prospective move.

    Is this legal?
    Afraid not. Once you've released the piece, you cannot move it anywhere else.
  3. 20 Apr '06 21:38
    I had this happen once in a tournament. The guy kept grabbing a piece and putting it on a square only without letting go, looking the position over, then trying another square. I asked him to stop, and he said it wasn't illegal. I got the TD who told me the same thing (rightly or wrongly, I don't know). I still insisted the guy stop because he was violating Rule 20G where he was forbidden to distract or annoy me.
  4. Standard member 33moves
    4th stooge
    20 Apr '06 21:49
    Originally posted by ark13
    If I understand the rules correctly, you must move a piece that you touch, but your move isn't complete until you hit your clock. If this is the case, I see two ways one could use this to one's advantage.

    1. You're sure you want to move a certain piece, but you're not sure where. You can put it on a prospective square to aid in your calculations. It's on ...[text shortened]... your opponent into revealing their responce to your prospective move.

    Is this legal?
    But as to your point #2, I am confused- you wait for the reaction of your opponent, and they move their piece, what are you supposed to do when you don't like their move, launch into a protracted explanation about how you haven't technically moved yet, because you haven't hit your clock, so lets move our pieces back, and I will move my piece to a different square, where its not a blunder!? It sounds like that is what you were saying, at least.
  5. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    20 Apr '06 21:50
    Originally posted by mtthw
    Afraid not. Once you've released the piece, you cannot move it anywhere else.
    But, as I understand the rules, this isn't the case.
  6. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    20 Apr '06 21:52
    Originally posted by 33moves
    But as to your point #2, I am confused- you wait for the reaction of your opponent, and they move their piece, what are you supposed to do when you don't like their move, launch into a protracted explanation about how you haven't technically moved yet, because you haven't hit your clock, so lets move our pieces back, and I will move my piece to a different square, where its not a blunder!? It sounds like that is what you were saying, at least.
    Pretty much. You explain that it's still your move, and ask your opponent to return his piece to its original square. You may end up deciding on a different square for your piece, you may not. I'm not saying it's good sportsmanship, and I don't intend to try this strategy; I'm just asking if it's legal and possible.
  7. 20 Apr '06 22:08
    Da rules........once you've touched the piece intentionally, you are required to move it. If your hand has not left the piece and you realize it's a blunder, you may move it to another square. You may return the piece to it's original square and think about it some more, but you gotta move it.
  8. Standard member 33moves
    4th stooge
    20 Apr '06 22:36 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ark13
    Pretty much. You explain that it's still your move, and ask your opponent to return his piece to its original square. You may end up deciding on a different square for your piece, you may not. I'm not saying it's good sportsmanship, and I don't intend to try this strategy; I'm just asking if it's legal and possible.
    A pretty funny, and absurd idea- Imagine how that would rile the opponent! From that perspective, it has merit! When you look at how Bobby Fischer played horrible mind games with Spassky during their famous match with his primadonna antics and constant threats to pull out of the match, play in a back room, etc! One of the very early chess masters, maybe Ruy Lopez or Greco suggested place the opponent so that the sun is in his eyes! You and your devious mind- I like it. If it ever happens to me, I would buy my opponent a drink after the game and share a laugh. Of course, I wouldn't let him get away with it.
  9. 20 Apr '06 22:40
    I believe there's a warning about the right to move the piece around not being abused if you change your mind, you can't just scoot a piece all over the place a dozen times and annoy your opponent, the TD can tax you if you're acting like a jerk.
  10. 20 Apr '06 22:46
    Originally posted by 33moves
    A pretty funny, and absurd idea- Imagine how that would rile the opponent! From that perspective, it has merit! When you look at how Bobby Fischer played horrible mind games with Spassky during their famous match with his primadonna antics and constant threats to pull out of the match, play in a back room, etc! One of the very early chess masters, maybe Ruy ...[text shortened]... onent a drink after the game and share a laugh. Of course, I wouldn't let him get away with it.
    He also mentioned taking your opponent out for a big lunch before the match and make sure he eats a lot and drinks a lot. Then the stage is set for the game.

    Position the board so the sun is in your opponents eyes and your set.

    Keep in mind, you gotta be playing outdoors, the sun must be really bright and you lose $x for the lunch.

    How much do you value the chess victory?
  11. 20 Apr '06 22:51
    As someone mentioned. You touch the piece you gotta move it to a legal square as long as the move is legal. You can pick it up, move it, return it back to the original square if you change your mind as long as you haven't pressed the clock.

    It really depends on the tournament format, friendly vs non friendly and some TD's will tell you to stop doing it. It depends.

    During serious tournaments I had someone do this to me but mostly they move and wait, without pressing the clock. What I do is just sit there and start thinking without moving anything, they think it's my move so I take my time, walk away come back, think a bit more walk away. The whole time thier clock is tick tocking. After I think enough time has passes I point to the clock, and they are like OH! and press the button.

    Of course in friendly games, I remind them twice right away, and after that I don't care. I let their clock run out till they figure out they haven't pressed the clock.
  12. Standard member 33moves
    4th stooge
    20 Apr '06 23:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RahimK
    As someone mentioned. You touch the piece you gotta move it to a legal square as long as the move is legal. You can pick it up, move it, return it back to the original square if you change your mind as long as you haven't pressed the clock.

    It really depends on the tournament format, friendly vs non friendly and some TD's will tell you to stop doing it. I don't care. I let their clock run out till they figure out they haven't pressed the clock.
    That clock thing happend to me this past weekend. My opponent was 700 points higher rated, and I was holding my own, but short on time- I let at least 7 mins go by while he sat there thinking- my big clue- he didn't seem to have the "strained" look of running through variations in his mind, just kind of sitting there looking at the pieces- then I looked at my clock! What a maroon! I wispered that I forgot to hit my clock and he pretended to just notice- its part of the game- the losing part. I call that brilliant move the time gambit.
  13. 20 Apr '06 23:08
    Originally posted by 33moves
    That clock thing happend to me this past weekend. My opponent was 700 points higher rated, and I was holding my own, but short on time- I let at least 7 mins go by while he sat there thinking- my big clue- he didn't seem to have the "strained" look of running through variations in his mind, just kind of sitting there looking at the pieces- then I looked at m ...[text shortened]... orgot to hit my clock and he pretended to just notice- its part of the game- the losing part.
    That's harsh.

    I'm very considerate and during friendly games I do remind then instantly but if they continue doing it then to bad for them. However, in serious games I try not to disturb them and i'm not sure if they made up their mind of not. Some people do move a piece and then pick it up and move it somewhere esle. I can't be to sure about that. So I let some time run off before reminding them but not 7 min though, especially not when they are in time trouble. Mostly it's like 2 min or so and then I let them know.
  14. 20 Apr '06 23:32
    I saw a kid in a tournament watch his opponent move, then go out for a smoke. The kid (About 14) moved instantly, as soon as his opponent turned his back to leave. When his opponent returned at the other end of the room, the kid sat and concentrated on the board like he was deep in thought. The poor putz he was playing thought the boy was still concentrating on a move, and had a nice long chat with some other players, only to discover 20 minutes later that his clock was running and he had only a few minutes left....hahahahaha....good for the kid.
  15. 20 Apr '06 23:38
    Originally posted by General Putzer
    I saw a kid in a tournament watch his opponent move, then go out for a smoke. The kid (About 14) moved instantly, as soon as his opponent turned his back to leave. When his opponent returned at the other end of the room, the kid sat and concentrated on the board like he was deep in thought. The poor putz he was playing thought the boy was still concen ...[text shortened]... that his clock was running and he had only a few minutes left....hahahahaha....good for the kid.
    Hahaha. That's why I like the clocks with the lights on top that shows whose move it is. This way you can see when it's your turn from the other end of the room. I think getting up often and watching other peoples games as if your own game is boring you sikes out your opponent too.