Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 11 Jan '07 02:32 / 2 edits
    Does anyone have any tips on how to retain lines in openings? What is a good way to study the openings?

    Thanks
  2. 11 Jan '07 03:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RabbitCold
    Does anyone have any tips on how to retain lines in openings? What is a good way to study the openings?

    Thanks
    do you know how do the pieces move?
  3. Standard member Dies Irae
    I Love U
    11 Jan '07 04:25
    Originally posted by Von Bardeleben
    do you know how do the pieces move?
    No I do know not how piece moves
  4. 11 Jan '07 04:26
    @von Bardleben:
    Please try to behave and only answer questions sincerely,instead of makin' those meant to be funny remarks.

    On the topic: I think I could advice you if you specify the question,
    in general: playin opening lines vs friend over the board and online helps a lot, also consider byin some books,
    if u play 1.e4 with white for instance: Openings according to Anand by Alexander Khalifman is good, I didnt check your rating but this is quite a heavy serie, if u are a starter u night want to begin with something lighter.
  5. 11 Jan '07 04:29
    What also helps a lot is to pick a strong grandmaster and to "copy" his opening lines, that way you know for sure its bein played a lot and new ideas in that opening will come up reguraly in grandmaster games.
    Good luck!
  6. 11 Jan '07 05:44
    I goto chessgames.com, enter a certain opening name in the search engine and view all the games by GMs that used that opening. After a few hundred times it starts to get scorched into your brain. There's also an added benefit that you don't have to read the notation and figure out where the pieces have to move, there is a handy play/reverse button on the side you can click away and a visual of the game in front of you. I highly recommend it.

    What's cool is you also get to see how some GMs will react to different variations.
  7. 11 Jan '07 05:54 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by RabbitCold
    Does anyone have any tips on how to retain lines in openings? What is a good way to study the openings?

    Thanks
    Buy an Andrew Martin opening DVD's, hes a good teacher and watching him play through the lines while talking about them is a good way to get a fairly adequate understanding of an opening fast.

    To be honest I dont think you're going to learn openings very well without shelling out a bit of money on books, lessons or dvds.

    With books I find what works best for me is going through the book generally to get a grip with the ideas then batting out the opening in blitz-rapid play games to see where you're going wrong in the opening phase and knocking up the number of position you've seen from it then going back to the book and studying deeper after that keep knocking it out in rapid play games and then try 90+ games.
  8. 11 Jan '07 09:11
    i've heard book-up is very good for learning a specific opening.
  9. 11 Jan '07 23:21
    Thanks for those that have given advice. I have books, but sometimes I cant recall what I should know. So just seeing if there is any shortcuts.

    Ill play you if you think I cant move the pieces
  10. 11 Jan '07 23:46
    Originally posted by RabbitCold
    Thanks for those that have given advice. I have books, but sometimes I cant recall what I should know. So just seeing if there is any shortcuts.

    Ill play you if you think I cant move the pieces
    why would anyone waste their time on someone who don't know how to move pieces? seriously...
  11. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    12 Jan '07 01:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RabbitCold
    Does anyone have any tips on how to retain lines in openings? What is a good way to study the openings?

    Thanks
    Repetition is the mother of learning.

    How do you memorize anything? Do it repeatedly. Review and quiz. Review again.

    With respect to chess openings, however, the moves that are based on correct positional understanding start to look natural after awhile. If you look for good moves that mobilize and coordinate your pieces, fight for the center, and reduce your vulnerability, sometimes you'll find that you've played "book" moves far longer than you imagine.
  12. 12 Jan '07 17:54
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    Repetition is the mother of learning.

    How do you memorize anything? Do it repeatedly. Review and quiz. Review again.

    With respect to chess openings, however, the moves that are based on correct positional understanding start to look natural after awhile. If you look for good moves that mobilize and coordinate your pieces, fight for the center, and redu ...[text shortened]... rability, sometimes you'll find that you've played "book" moves far longer than you imagine.
    This is correct. Sometimes it is fun to get out a copy of MCO (or other opening encylopedia), choose a line at random and play blitz games with a friend where you must duplicate the first 5-8 moves out of it. Trade colors every game. After you play 3 as white and 3 as black, move on to a new opening. This is also good way to choose a repitoire as you will quickly learn weather or not you like the opening.
  13. 12 Jan '07 17:56
    Originally posted by zebano
    This is correct. Sometimes it is fun to get out a copy of MCO (or other opening encylopedia), choose a line at random and play blitz games with a friend where you must duplicate the first 5-8 moves out of it. Trade colors every game. After you play 3 as white and 3 as black, move on to a new opening. This is also good way to choose a repitoire as you will quickly learn weather or not you like the opening.
    It took me a while to be accustomed to the Dragon though - and that might be my favorite opening now.
  14. Standard member Mathurine
    sorozatgyilkos
    12 Jan '07 17:59
    Originally posted by RabbitCold
    Does anyone have any tips on how to retain lines in openings? What is a good way to study the openings?

    Thanks
    The pages here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_opening

    give a pretty good basic overview of what you need to do in the opening lines.


  15. 12 Jan '07 18:05
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    It took me a while to be accustomed to the Dragon though - and that might be my favorite opening now.
    To expand on what I said earlier...

    First off, don't do a set game, you must play those 5-8 moves in order start remembering them. 3 whites and 3 blacks is just enough to give you an idea if you want to learn the opening. Once you key in on openings you like, start trying more of the variations. If you still like it, play more games with it, but let your partner choose the variation. For instance if you choose Kings gambit, Require that 1. e4 e5 f4 be played, but your partner can choose to play exf and g5 or he might decline with Bc4. Since the point is to learn, continue to play both sides and try not to repeat the same variation too often.

    It is best to double check the book after each game to see where they reccomend you play differentely. The sharper the system, the more important it is to get the moves in the right order.

    After all that work, you should know it well enough to play it over the board.


    As a simple alternative, play lots of correspondence games, and think up your move, but before playing it, check it against a book/database of your favorite players games. (don't use something like the Chessbase Big database which has lots of games from club players in simuls as well as Kasparov/Karpov/Kramnik games). If you understand why they did what they did, play thier move, if not, play your move. Review your losses, you may start understanding why masters avoid your lines.