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  1. 28 May '06 01:20
    do you stay until the tournament is completed? 1 game a day? can you walk away from the board and eat something while playing?(for bloodsugar maintanence.) do they provide the boards? should i as an unrated player who suspect my otb rating is around 1500( certainly will be before i enter one i hope.) enter the unrated section or the 1500 section? is there a choice? anything else i should know?
  2. 28 May '06 01:30
    You can't choose what section you enter...you'll be put in under 1200/unrated. I actually have never been in an OTB tournament either, been looking for one though. But that's how it is. I'm about 99% sure you can walk from the board at any time, but don't forget that you have a clock. And how long you stay will likely depend on tournament setup. I'd bet it'd be swiss system in which case you'd be there all day.
  3. 28 May '06 02:05
    Depends on the time controls, 40/2 hours plus a second time control for serious tournaments, you'll get two games a day, faster time controls you may play 4 or 5.
    OTB rated tournaments are great, it's a real thrill, like gambling in Vegas feels the first time.
  4. 28 May '06 02:20
    I've only been in the Calchess tournament. However, I had a choice as to which section to enter in and also had to bring a clock. Boards and pieces were provided though. As for food, I don't know if there is a rule against it, but it would seem disrespectful to your opponent. I haven't seen anyone eat during a match, but drinking is fine. Also, during that tournament, 3 90 min matches were played each day. I hope that clears up a few things. However, keep in mind that not all tournaments are the same.
  5. 28 May '06 02:30
    I can't even imagine playing ONE game for 90 minutes. I guess I have been playing too much blitz. Even taking the most time I need I will be WAY under the time limit.

    Does anyone have any suggestions on how to train yourself to play slower games?
  6. 28 May '06 02:34
    I thought the same thing, but for most games, I only had about 10-20 minutes left.
  7. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    28 May '06 10:32
    Originally posted by prosoccer
    I can't even imagine playing ONE game for 90 minutes. I guess I have been playing too much blitz. Even taking the most time I need I will be WAY under the time limit.

    Does anyone have any suggestions on how to train yourself to play slower games?
    maybe this article from dan heisman helps:

    The Case for Time Management
    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman40.pdf

    there was also other novice nook articles on time management
    http://www.chesscafe.com/archives/archives.htm#Novice%20Nook
  8. 28 May '06 11:44 / 6 edits
    Originally posted by TheDarkKnight
    do you stay until the tournament is completed? 1 game a day? can you walk away from the board and eat something while playing?(for bloodsugar maintanence.) do they provide the boards? should i as an unrated player who suspect my otb rating is around 1500( certainly will be before i enter one i hope.) enter the unrated section or the 1500 section? is there a choice? anything else i should know?
    I never stay unless I get paid (why should I waste time watching other players getting their prizes?). 2-3 games a day is typical here in (G/90m) tournaments. yes you can walk. and eat too. if you have time, you can go to a restaurant and eat there. boards/pieces/clocks are usually provided but not always. if you are an unrated player you must play in unrated section, no matter how good you think you are.

    other things you should know? be confident. dont let more experienced players fool you (like, if you are playing with black pieces, letting them to decide place of the clock). DONT TRUST YOUR OPPONENTS. if you see your opponent touching a piece and then suddenly moving another piece assuming that you, as new and inexperienced player, wont say anything. Dont let that happen!!! I have seen dozens of times when young and shy novice players dont have courage to open their mouths...
  9. 28 May '06 14:15
    Imagine a hot room crammed full of 100 sweeting, balding, badly dressed men - that pretty much sums it up. Oh and there is chess too.
  10. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    28 May '06 15:48
    In the US, a typical weekend tournament is run as a five round Swiss--three games on Saturday and two on Sunday. Longer events, such as many held this weekend, may have fewer games per day, or more games. They also may have longer time controls.

    In my city these are nearly always G/120 (two hours per player per game). Play starts at 10 am and ends at 11pm on Saturday, but Sunday goes only 9-5. I usually get up while my opponent is thinking to check out the other games, and because I drink a lot of water (and some of the bad coffee they supply), to make a trip to the loo.

    We are expected to bring our own sets and clocks, but not everyone does. According to the USCF rules, the player of the black pieces supplies the set and clock, but we have a preference for clocks with a time delay (G/115 + 5 second delay), and I have an analog clock. I usually bring a couple chess sets--a nice one that I prefer to use, and a cheaper set if I'm playing a certain player that is subject to temper tantrums (it took a week to get all the soda pop stains off my pieces after I scored a draw in a dead lost position when his flag fell a few years ago).
  11. 28 May '06 18:48
    thx for all the info everyone, its good to know that my blood sugar problems dont have to keep me from playing in a long tournament. ive heard something aboud the size of the board being important, what size would i need? does it matter if its slightly bigger or larger? thx again.
  12. 28 May '06 19:57 / 1 edit
    Contrary to two other peoples posts, in the USCF you do not have to play in the unrated section. You simply cannot enter a rating restricted section, hence you may play the unrated or the open section (where you may play experts and masters depending on the strength of the tournament).

    OTB tournaments are tons of fun. Around here we usually have 1/month that is a 4 round swiss with game at 60 (or SD/55 with 5 second delay), start at 10am and finish around 10pm. Every 3 months the tournament is a 2 day, 5 round SD/120 event. I prefer the longer time controls, but it's hard to get away from the family for a whole weekend.

    In the US you are generally expected to bring your own set and clock(apparently this is not the case in other countries, talk to the TD - tournament director).

    Sleep well the night before and have a blast. The most important thing is to not let a loss one round affect your play in the next.

    Edit: I usually take a bag lunch with lots of fruit which I eat while playing.
  13. 28 May '06 21:20
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    You can't choose what section you enter...you'll be put in under 1200/unrated. I actually have never been in an OTB tournament either, been looking for one though. But that's how it is. I'm about 99% sure you can walk from the board at any time, but don't forget that you have a clock. And how long you stay will likely depend on tournament setup. I'd bet it'd be swiss system in which case you'd be there all day.
    Do they really let you walk away?

    What if you walk away to get help on a position?
  14. 28 May '06 22:01
    Then you have just cheated.
  15. 29 May '06 02:52
    Originally posted by LanndonKane
    Do they really let you walk away?

    What if you walk away to get help on a position?
    I've been to tournaments where my opponent gets up for a short walk every second or so move. I've started trying getting up at least once or twice a game and noticed that taking my mind off the game for a short while will actually help me get a fresh feel for the position and ultimately play better.

    I've never seen my opponent leave the actual tournament premises, so I don't know if it's allowed or not. I don't see how they can get help on the position unless they have a handheld chess computer or they ask a spectator to follow them and ask them what the best move is .