Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    24 Jun '17 13:34
    Can anyone help me out with what caused this software glitch on this recording?
    It starts at 15:11 and goes almost all the way to 16:00, two different scenes, but it's the same result and I can't figure it out!

    Thanks in advance.

    YouTube
  2. 24 Jun '17 15:15
    I don't see any software glitch. Take it to debates.
  3. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 08:31
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I don't see any software glitch. Take it to debates.
    If it's not a software glitch, what is your explanation for what happens ~15:11-16:00 mark?
    Are the stars merely reflecting off the surface of the planet, or does the planet suddenly become transparent?
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 Jun '17 16:50
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    If it's not a software glitch, what is your explanation for what happens ~15:11-16:00 mark?
    Are the stars merely reflecting off the surface of the planet, or does the planet suddenly become transparent?
    Are you really that dense? You don't recognize image overlays when you see them? Have you ever thought they just might have overlaid star images on the night scene of Earth for dramatic effect?
  5. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 18:56
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Are you really that dense? You don't recognize image overlays when you see them? Have you ever thought they just might have overlaid star images on the night scene of Earth for dramatic effect?
    Ha!
    That's so precious!
    Priceless, really.
    Now NASA (or other space agency) is in the dramatic effect biz?
    Positively cute!

    Seriously, though: why the eff up?
  6. 25 Jun '17 21:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    If it's not a software glitch, what is your explanation for what happens ~15:11-16:00 mark?
    Are the stars merely reflecting off the surface of the planet, or does the planet suddenly become transparent?
    I think it is reflections (in glass near the camera, not the planet) but without more information about the source of the video I can't tell. I don't think it has anything to do with software though. I saw the shuttle in other parts of the video so it is presumably quite old footage.
  7. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    26 Jun '17 09:04
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I think it is reflections (in glass near the camera, not the planet) but without more information about the source of the video I can't tell. I don't think it has anything to do with software though. I saw the shuttle in other parts of the video so it is presumably quite old footage.
    We should also consider the possibility that the Earth is made of glass.

    Flat glass.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    26 Jun '17 12:06 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    Ha!
    That's so precious!
    Priceless, really.
    Now NASA (or other space agency) is in the dramatic effect biz?
    Positively cute!

    Seriously, though: why the eff up?
    Looking at it closer I see stars moving but the dots of light not. What that is then is noise on the camera, points of light that are dots of the sensors putting out a point of light because of camera noise. If you look closely at the stars visible, they are moving but the dots of light are not so it is noise in the camera. If they wanted bad enough they could have run an algorithm to eliminate the dots of light. You notice at the beginning, the title said 'raw data'. That means un-processed to remove bits like the dots on the camera sensor. I first thought it was an overlay for effect but then I noticed the dots were not moving compared to the background with stars changing position but not the dots. There are a couple of dark dots at 14;48 and at the end the dots clearly move because they are specs on the camera so several artifacts may be happening where there was dust on the camera lens, noise in the electronics.
  9. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    26 Jun '17 17:15
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Looking at it closer I see stars moving but the dots of light not. What that is then is noise on the camera, points of light that are dots of the sensors putting out a point of light because of camera noise. If you look closely at the stars visible, they are moving but the dots of light are not so it is noise in the camera. If they wanted bad enough they co ...[text shortened]... al artifacts may be happening where there was dust on the camera lens, noise in the electronics.
    The stars are not moving.
    In the few seconds leading up to the 15:11 stretch, there's a shot of the shuttle to the right of the frame, earth covering 3/4's of the rest of the screen.
    Unless my screen resolution is off, I see no stars at all, curiously.
    Otherwise, the stars in both scenes are stationary.
    And showing up through the earth.
  10. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    26 Jun '17 19:59
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    The stars are not moving.
    In the few seconds leading up to the 15:11 stretch, there's a shot of the shuttle to the right of the frame, earth covering 3/4's of the rest of the screen.
    Unless my screen resolution is off, I see no stars at all, curiously.
    Otherwise, the stars in both scenes are stationary.
    And showing up through the earth.
    Look closer. Around 15:43 and on a few seconds if you look close you can see ground effects moving but the dots are not, clearly either dust on the camera or noise in the image detector. I would go for noise in the image detector because the dots are too clearly visible, in 'focus' but if it was due to dust on the lens, they would most likely not be seen much at all because they would be way out of focus.
  11. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    27 Jun '17 06:29
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Look closer. Around 15:43 and on a few seconds if you look close you can see ground effects moving but the dots are not, clearly either dust on the camera or noise in the image detector. I would go for noise in the image detector because the dots are too clearly visible, in 'focus' but if it was due to dust on the lens, they would most likely not be seen much at all because they would be way out of focus.
    As I said, it's the star field projected, not dust, not noise, and def not a reflection.
  12. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    27 Jun '17 07:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    As I said, it's the star field projected, not dust, not noise, and def not a reflection.
    If you knew what it was, then why come in here just to naysay people telling you what it is?

    Not enough people in Debates thinking you're a git?

    At least maybe you now know why NASA processes their images.

    Dust (or maybe micro-meteoroid pits) on the outside of the windows would be my wild guess, since that's really all we have to go on here, not knowing how old this footage is.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Jun '17 10:28 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    If you knew what it was, then why come in here just to naysay people telling you what it is?

    Not enough people in Debates thinking you're a git?

    At least maybe you now know why NASA processes their images.

    Dust (or maybe micro-meteoroid pits) on the outside of the windows would be my wild guess, since that's really all we have to go on here, not knowing how old this footage is.
    Besides that, it isn't even NASA footage. It is ESA stuff. I still think it is noise in the camera image sensor, it seems too much in focus to be dust on the lens but it still could be dust on a window and you don't have much image comprehension if you can't see the bits not moving in the frame and the stars moving in the background like I said just before the 15 minute point. Same thing with the Earth image, there are features moving in different ways there too but you cannot for some reason comprehend what is actually going on. I thought at first it was video overlay but I was wrong about that, it is in fact part of the footage however it happened but I think dust on a window or noise in the camera sensor is the answer. The fact you (Freak) cannot see the difference goes to your ability to comprehend in general.
    All that aside, once you saw the image you thought were stars showing on the surface of Earth, what was you agenda to put that video here? Back to the flat Earth thing or what? What is your aim here?
  14. 27 Jun '17 10:50
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    As I said, it's the star field projected, not dust, not noise, and def not a reflection.
    What do you mean by 'projected'? And how do you know its not a reflection? Have you been able to identify any constellations to prove that:
    a) it is stars and
    b) they are not reflected.
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Jun '17 11:03
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    What do you mean by 'projected'? And how do you know its not a reflection? Have you been able to identify any constellations to prove that:
    a) it is stars and
    b) they are not reflected.
    It's the same ole same ole, he sees what he want's to see and to hell with actual analysis and reason.