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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. 16 Apr '08 16:36
    I bet there are classic questions out there, they have probably been bothering scientists for generations and still unsolved. Can anyone identify some interesting ones, and see what the Redhotpawn Science Forum can do with them
  2. 17 Apr '08 02:37
    Originally posted by eamon o
    I bet there are classic questions out there, they have probably been bothering scientists for generations and still unsolved. Can anyone identify some interesting ones, and see what the Redhotpawn Science Forum can do with them
    Is "junk dna" truely junk? or is there actually some higher function?

    In my view it certainly provides evolutionary potential at least.

    Any views? or up to date publications I may have missed?
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Apr '08 03:42
    Originally posted by timebombted
    Is "junk dna" truely junk? or is there actually some higher function?

    In my view it certainly provides evolutionary potential at least.

    Any views? or up to date publications I may have missed?
    Here is one piece from last year, saying 'junk' dna is involved in turning genes off and on, a much more vital role than thought even a couple of years ago.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423185538.htm
  4. 18 Apr '08 03:36
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Here is one piece from last year, saying 'junk' dna is involved in turning genes off and on, a much more vital role than thought even a couple of years ago.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423185538.htm
    I had come across regulator genes before, but not specifically ones only involved in very early development, like the ones used for cell mapping you highlighted in your article.

    Interesting read, thanks :0)

    FYI
    If you are interested in transposons, Michael Gillings publishes papers on this area of research....... its his major field of research.
  5. Standard member Thequ1ck
    Fast above
    20 Apr '08 14:06
    Originally posted by timebombted
    Is "junk dna" truely junk? or is there actually some higher function?

    In my view it certainly provides evolutionary potential at least.

    Any views? or up to date publications I may have missed?
    Well all of our genes have been derived from what was once junk DNA
    so it must have its uses.
  6. Subscriber Flying Dwarf
    Hunter of Texas Pete
    21 Apr '08 06:53
    Originally posted by timebombted
    Is "junk dna" truely junk? or is there actually some higher function?

    In my view it certainly provides evolutionary potential at least.

    Any views? or up to date publications I may have missed?
    I saw them play at the Hammersmith Apollo..... they were pretty good.

    Stop having a go at them
  7. 21 Apr '08 08:43
    Originally posted by timebombted

    Any views? or up to date publications I may have missed?[/b]
    im writing a piece on it right now
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 May '08 13:28
    Originally posted by eamon o
    im writing a piece on it right now
    What publication are you aiming for? Are you a scientist?
  9. 03 May '08 17:19
    since light cannot escape the gravity of a black hole, could a supermassive black hole "grab" a beam of light and reduce its speed to zero? If so, what would frozen photons look like?
  10. 03 May '08 17:38
    Originally posted by PinkFloyd
    since light cannot escape the gravity of a black hole, could a supermassive black hole "grab" a beam of light and reduce its speed to zero? If so, what would frozen photons look like?
    Actually, you would experience time dilation - as you are approaching the black hole, time will move more slowly - at the event horizon time is "frozen".

    P.S: This is true for all black holes, supermassive or otherise - the less massive the black hole, the smaller the event horizon, but you still get an even horizon.
  11. 04 May '08 01:45
    Originally posted by Retrovirus
    Actually, you would experience time dilation - as you are approaching the black hole, time will move more slowly - at the event horizon time is "frozen".

    P.S: This is true for all black holes, supermassive or otherise - the less massive the black hole, the smaller the event horizon, but you still get an even horizon.
    That sounds pretty cool. Thanks, retro
  12. 13 May '08 05:45
    Originally posted by eamon o
    im writing a piece on it right now
    If you get it published let us know the citiation / link, alternatively I'd still love to read your thoughts.

    Regards