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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Jan '11 19:51
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110110164736.htm

    Shows prolonged sitting in front of comp or more than 4 hrs a day of TV is very bad for your heart. I was wondering if this showed similar results to students who sit in classes all day. It makes you wonder if they should schedule recess more often in HS and college, get them on their feet for a while at least.
  2. 12 Jan '11 20:08
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post_hoc_ergo_propter_hoc
  3. Standard member joneschr
    Some guy
    12 Jan '11 20:57 / 1 edit
    I'm doomed.

    One thing that's interesting to me is that this is "independent of traditional risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, BMI, social class, as well as exercise."

    So I can work out an hour a day, eat right, and live a stress free life... but I sit down more than two hours at the computer and I'll bust a ventricle.

    How would sitting at a computer be any different than, say, sleeping 8 hours.

    I'm sort of surprised by that result. I figured that doing things that generally promote cardiovascular health would counteract a little bit of lazing around.
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Jan '11 07:04
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post_hoc_ergo_propter_hoc
    So you must be a post hoc post doc
  5. Subscriber Proper Knob
    Cornovii
    13 Jan '11 22:43
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110110164736.htm

    Shows prolonged sitting in front of comp or more than 4 hrs a day of TV is very bad for your heart. I was wondering if this showed similar results to students who sit in classes all day. It makes you wonder if they should schedule recess more often in HS and college, get them on their feet for a while at least.
    That doesn't even take into account the impact sitting down for prolonged periods has on the structures in your lower back.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    14 Jan '11 04:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Proper Knob
    That doesn't even take into account the impact sitting down for prolonged periods has on the structures in your lower back.
    Here is a link to an article about standing up at work:

    http://www.emaxhealth.com/1506/standing-work-can-improve-your-health-and-productivity.html

    And another:

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/standing-at-work/
  7. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Happy Chappie
    14 Jan '11 07:10
    Originally posted by Proper Knob
    That doesn't even take into account the impact sitting down for prolonged periods has on the structures in your lower back.
    Sitting down and keeping a straight back can actually be very beneficial.
    I really do think it depends on what sort of sitting you do as to what kind of symtoms you may cotract.
    For example you can actually meditate while playing chess and editting posts.
  8. Subscriber Proper Knob
    Cornovii
    14 Jan '11 10:02
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Sitting down and keeping a straight back can actually be very beneficial.
    I really do think it depends on what sort of sitting you do as to what kind of symtoms you may cotract.
    For example you can actually meditate while playing chess and editting posts.
    It's not necessarily about your lower back. Sitting down puts the hip joint in a constant state of flexion. That in itself has ramifications for the lower back.
  9. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Happy Chappie
    14 Jan '11 11:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Proper Knob
    It's not necessarily about your lower back. Sitting down puts the hip joint in a constant state of flexion. That in itself has ramifications for the lower back.
    Yeah ok, just keep standing then.

    All things are subject to the second law of thermodynamics.

    That means all physical systems are subject to decay, right?
  10. 14 Jan '11 12:21
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Yeah ok, just keep standing then.

    All things are subject to the second law of thermodynamics.

    That means all physical systems are subject to decay, right?
    No, since "decay" is a subjective term. You can formulate the Second Law in various ways; it means heat doesn't spontaneously flow from cold to warm. It also means that total entropy always increases in irreversible processes. However, self-organizing systems can increase the total entropy while also becoming more "organized", e.g. a snowflake.
  11. Subscriber Proper Knob
    Cornovii
    14 Jan '11 12:51
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Yeah ok, just keep standing then.

    All things are subject to the second law of thermodynamics.

    That means all physical systems are subject to decay, right?
    Nothing to do with the second law of thermodynamics Karoly.

    When in a sitting position the muscles that flex the hip joint (think bringing your knee to your chest) are in a shortened position. As a result of being in a constant shortened position they become tight (they being namely Iliacus andPsoas). The tight hip flexors then pull the front of the pelvis down, it's sexy name is 'anterior pelvic tilt'. The front of the pelvis going down means the back (posterior) goes up, the back of the pelvis moving results in the spine moving, as the spine is connected to the pelvis. This creates lordosis in the lower back. Not good. Now muscles that anchor the spine to the pelvis (namelyQuadratus lumborum) are in a shortened state, and as a result they now become tight.

    Add to this mix the glutes ie your ass. Being sat down all day means that the glute muscles are in a lengthed position, being in a constant lengthed postion has the opposite effect of being in a shortened position. They become weaker.

    Your muscles work in what's called 'chains', to perform a movement, they have to work together. The most important chain is what's called the 'posterior chain', which basically mean your hamstrings, ass (of which there are lots of muscles), and your lower back. Now we all ready know that sitting down for long periods of time lengthens the glutes which makes them become weaker. That means the other muscles in the posterior chain have to take more of the work as the glutes aren't pulling their weight.

    The lower back (ie Quadratus lumborum which is part of ther posterior chain) is already tight from being in lordosis, now it has to work harder because the glutes aren't working properly. You end up with a tight shortened muscle working more then it should do. That creates pain. And that is the basic nuts and bolts of why 1/4 people will suffer from back pain at some point in in their life. Me being one of them.
  12. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Happy Chappie
    14 Jan '11 13:11
    Originally posted by Proper Knob
    Nothing to do with the second law of thermodynamics Karoly.

    When in a sitting position the muscles that flex the hip joint (think bringing your knee to your chest) are in a shortened position. As a result of being in a constant shortened position they become tight (they being namely Iliacus andPsoas). The tight hip flexors then pull the ...[text shortened]... ople will suffer from back pain at some point in in their life. Me being one of them.
    Ah thanks Proper Knob.

    My back is sore now.
    But how in the hell do you account for some people exeperiencing back pain and ohers not? After all , we all sit down, (or more than 25% anyway), for periods of time.

    How can I stay trim and fit after a year of slouching around and eating while others that work hard on their fitness always have to contend with weight and other health issues?
    Is that llike a metabolism thing?
  13. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Happy Chappie
    14 Jan '11 13:13
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No, since "decay" is a subjective term. You can formulate the Second Law in various ways; it means heat doesn't spontaneously flow from cold to warm. It also means that total entropy always increases in irreversible processes. However, self-organizing systems can increase the total entropy while also becoming more "organized", e.g. a snowflake.
    Pffft.

    We're not snowflakes.
  14. 15 Jan '11 11:36
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Pffft.

    We're not snowflakes.
    Indeed we are not, but I was just illustrating that the Second Law has nothing to do with this.
  15. 22 Feb '11 07:40
    Originally posted by joneschr


    How would sitting at a computer be any different than, say, sleeping 8 hours.
    the sitting in front of a comp is in ADDITION to sleeping 8 hours.

    try a week of bed rest, see if you notice any difference at the end of it.