1. Melbourne, Australia
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    02 Sep '11 00:14
    This longish excerpt is from an article about Taoism and 'Midlife Crisis' I liked it and share it.
    Source: http://personaltao.com/taoism-library/midlife-crisis/midlife-crisis-and-taoism/

    ..."A Taoist Meaning of Life.

    Sometimes midlife crisis focuses into a strong desire to embrace a meaningful goal for one’s life.

    From a western perspective, the meaning of life ends up as a destination, a set of moral practices to define goals of achievement. Western lifestyle often tends to use goals to shape a person’s life. Taoism has no goals. Instead Taoism stresses living itself shapes a person rather than any goal. The teachings of Taoism embrace the journey of living as the very meaning of life.

    Western perspective: A person shapes life to a goal: To a defining final purpose.
    Taoist perspective: The shape of a life: is the meaning of life: No final defining purpose exists at all! Instead the defining aspect of life is in the living of each moment.

    This becomes clearer when seeing Taoism define the Tao: The Tao is indefinable!

    These are very different viewpoints. This is also one reason westerners can experience confusion in understanding Taoism. Western thought is often approaching life from the opposite perspective!

    In living, it’s the path a person travels and not expectation of results that becomes the meaning of Taoist’s life. A Taoist embraces life fully and with gusto. This means within each moment to move with what feels best and right over working to a pre-defined plan on where a person needs to be.

    A Taoist perspective is very helpful for a person experiencing midlife crisis.

    As a philosophy Taoism frees a person from restrictive relationship chains and unreasonable personal expectations. Taoism removes the pressures from institutional doctrines trying to force a person to be something they are not.
    Taoism stresses personal acceptance as a practice. Taoism guides a person to understanding and embracing their current life. This leads a person out from living in the past. Taoism helps a person realize they are always free to move forward away from any past sin or problem that might be tying them down. A Taoist practice helps a person experiencing a life crisis to move with life rather than self inflicting pain as a form of repentance from the past or overly worrying about the future.
    If no final goal exists: a Taoist discovers a style of life, based upon grace of one’s actions, to become the important defining aspect to their very life.
    A Taoist discovers good humor in their life. The only thing a person can be perfect at is being themselves. It’s the defining quality of being an individual. In that we will make mistakes, Taoism teaches how to embrace personal mistakes. If a person cannot laugh at their very own life, then they haven’t embraced life with acceptance of their own nature. Grace then becomes a process of learning how to not make the same mistakes (well not too often) as we move forward.
    A surprising truth, in living life completely, a Taoist also embraces a concept of heaven. While the perspective of Taoism and Western attitudes might be opposite, the results of embracing life with acceptance are the same. The difference of perspective means that a Taoist recognizes heaven within life over a westerner’s belief of heaven to be a future goal.
    For many Taoist’s heaven isn’t as much as a religious concept but rather a spiritual part of life. It’s a concept of living fully with a spiritual grace. Where spirit represents the movement of our very life. Western thought removes heaven from life, making heaven only a religious pursuit. So just mentioning heaven in this article will cause some readers to get upset due to religious overtones. Taoism teaches this is an issue of perception. This is an important issue to overcome towards finding personal peace. For some people experiencing midlife crisis, this aspect can actually be the crux to the crisis: trying to reconcile one’s religious background relative to their deeper personal beliefs. Taoism helps, as it helps simplify the understanding of these internal conflicts we accumulate in life.
    Taoism teaches patience of time. In the rush to complete goals people get impatient with not making progress. Time is irrelevant to a Taoist. As a result working through a midlife crisis isn’t overwhelming to a Taoist. It simply just is and it passes quickly as one lives fully.

    A person in western culture typically approaches midlife crisis with the idea that only a single final goal exists. For example, many people experiencing midlife crisis will start Yoga, Qigong, or some other practice… expecting an answer will arise from the practice… Mentally they have set a goal for their midlife transformation: a goal of enlightenment, to be in better shape, to enjoy life, to do so many things.

    The problem with the western approach: a person quickly becomes upset or disheartened when not making progress. A midlife transformation doesn’t follow any business schedule or personal agenda. The more a person forces their midlife crisis towards being a certain goal: the longer the midlife crisis will spread out over their life.
    Midlife transformation is as much about “letting go” as it is about transformation.

    Transformation and “letting go” are the same thing."...
  2. Joined
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    02 Sep '11 02:21
    taoism is a respectable philosophy. while it's not my personal top three, i've always valued the three jewels of the dao, though i'm still aspiring towards the humility. that one is a tough nut to crack especially with all the [insert expletive] running around.
  3. England
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    02 Sep '11 08:58
    it seems to be for the mid life cry.. well ive been thro it.. i did not buy some over priced sports car/bike/girl/etc. however nature spread my tummy, cut my hair down. give me life lines [wrinkles to everyone] and the need for a comfy chair [one thats easy to get out of without a groan] the rest is B S, as it comes with a certain amount of money freedom you do change your prioritys.
  4. Melbourne, Australia
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    02 Sep '11 14:53
    Originally posted by stoker
    it seems to be for the mid life cry.. well ive been thro it.. i did not buy some over priced sports car/bike/girl/etc. however nature spread my tummy, cut my hair down. give me life lines [wrinkles to everyone] and the need for a comfy chair [one thats easy to get out of without a groan] the rest is B S, as it comes with a certain amount of money freedom you do change your prioritys.
    One changes one's priorities even without money freedom.

    The description sounds like someone like me, past that stuff. Thank heavens, (or the Tao).

    I think my mlc was when I started acting like Don Juan, saving the world as I charged at windmills! lol.
  5. Melbourne, Australia
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    02 Sep '11 15:02
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    taoism is a respectable philosophy. while it's not my personal top three, i've always valued the three jewels of the dao, though i'm still aspiring towards the humility. that one is a tough nut to crack especially with all the [insert expletive] running around.
    Trouble with humility is that the moment one thinks "Oh how humble am I" you've stuffed it up.

    I don't attach labels to myself anymore. Tao means way or path in Chinese. To me "Taoman" just means I am into Ways, a Wayman really. Taoism is just one, but a good down to earth one. It balances its mate, Buddhism, with all its tendency to excessive headiness sometimes.
  6. Standard memberDasa
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    02 Sep '11 17:19
    Originally posted by Taoman
    This longish excerpt is from an article about Taoism and 'Midlife Crisis' I liked it and share it.
    Source: http://personaltao.com/taoism-library/midlife-crisis/midlife-crisis-and-taoism/

    ..."A Taoist Meaning of Life.

    Sometimes midlife crisis focuses into a strong desire to embrace a meaningful goal for one’s life.

    From a western perspective, the mea ...[text shortened]... o” as it is about transformation.

    Transformation and “letting go” are the same thing."...
    So the meaning of life is to do your own thing.

    Your own thing then becomes your meaning.

    This is not correct but simply misdirecting persons.

    The meaning of human life is to re-establish the forgotten relationship with God.

    Our relationship with God is eternal and can never be broken.... but only forgotten.

    Not accepting God or the individual soul is the beginning of ignorance and is akin to atheism.

    Actually Buddhism is atheism dressed up in spirituality.

    Atheism has already been debunked by the seers of the truth and the many reasons why .......you are already familiar with.

    Atheism cannot benefit the suffering people but only add to their already suffering condition.

    The central theme of Buddhism is to control the mind and curb the desires and this when achieved will offer some temporary peace but without re-establishing our eternal relationship with God there can be no eternal peace but only continual suffering on the wheel of birth and death.

    Buddha came for one reason........to stop animal slaughter at the hands of Vedic ritual and it was accomplished by turning persons away from the Veda and introducing the law of Ahimsa ( non violence)...........therefore any Buddhist who eats meat is not a Buddhist at all but you already know this.

    The fact that the earliest Buddhist texts, such as the Pali Jatakas, mention Buddha's birth as King Rama, Kapila, Janaka, is called "Mahapurusha" and Purushottama and Narasiha shows that Buddha is none other than Vishnu himself. In ignorance, both Buddhists and Hindus have been denying this fact. When we search the popular thousand names of Vishnu as found in the Mahabharata, we find other names that clearly remind us of Lord Buddha.

    Vishnu is called "shaanta-aakaaram" -- ever peaceful. Buddha too is the sage who has stopped, he is stillness personified.

    Veveshti Vyaapnoti iti Vishnuh-That which pervades everywhere is Vishnu. That which has the nature of pervasiveness is Vishnu. He is the one who pervades all and nothing ever pervades Him. Even in early Pali texts Lord Buddha is able to go anywhere in any realm - in one of the Suttas to Ananda, he explains his voice alone can reach anywhere in this universe.

    So Lord Buddha is God incarnate but Buddhists deny God........this is clearly interesting.

    Namaste
  7. Joined
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    02 Sep '11 17:48
    Originally posted by Taoman
    This longish excerpt is from an article about Taoism and 'Midlife Crisis' I liked it and share it.
    Source: http://personaltao.com/taoism-library/midlife-crisis/midlife-crisis-and-taoism/

    ..."A Taoist Meaning of Life.

    Sometimes midlife crisis focuses into a strong desire to embrace a meaningful goal for one’s life.

    From a western perspective, the mea ...[text shortened]... o” as it is about transformation.

    Transformation and “letting go” are the same thing."...
    Sometimes I wonder if there is too sharp a distinction drawn between 'western' and other perspectives, typically 'eastern.' But it is difficult to know, without experiencing both. Sometimes I think that those who do experience both, say, for example, a person of a western perspective who transitions to an eastern perspective, are a non-representative sample, because (perhaps) their departure from the western perspective was motivated by their being inculcated in an extreme form of the western perspective. IOW perhaps average followers of the two perspectives are more alike than is usually depicted.
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    03 Sep '11 00:351 edit
    Originally posted by Dasa
    So the meaning of life is to do your own thing.


    the journey of life being the meaning of life is a far cry from doing your own thing. perhaps you should consult vishnu for more understanding.



    Actually Buddhism is atheism dressed up in spirituality.
    ...


    taoism, not buddhism. perhaps you should consult vishnu for more understanding.
  9. Standard memberDasa
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    03 Sep '11 01:40
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    Originally posted by Dasa
    So the meaning of life is to do your own thing.


    the journey of life being the meaning of life is a far cry from doing your own thing. perhaps you should consult vishnu for more understanding.



    Actually Buddhism is atheism dressed up in spirituality.
    ...


    taoism, not buddhism. perhaps you should consult vishnu for more understanding.
    I have not said they are the same.

    It was just time to mention Buddhism and that post reminded me of that.

    I am well aware that they have completely different beliefs but they both come under the heading of atheism (covered atheism.)

    They both are ignorant of Godhead and reject the Vedic authority.

    However......

    They both respect proper behaviour and non violence.

    They both respect nobility and right attitude.

    They both are seeking peace and relief of suffering.
  10. Joined
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    03 Sep '11 03:10
    Originally posted by Dasa
    I have not said they are the same.


    you aimed your criticism against buddhism in response to a post on daoism. you did not a single time refer to daoism anywhere in your response.

    it's not a wonder you have criticism against buddha. he rightly rejected vedic authority. and he was accepted as the incarnation of god, so he's kind of a competition to your precious vishnu and assorted avatars.



    I am well aware that they have completely different beliefs but they both come under the heading of atheism (covered atheism.)

    They both are ignorant of Godhead and reject the Vedic authority.



    nothing negative with either of those views.



    However......

    They both respect proper behaviour and non violence.

    They both respect nobility and right attitude.

    They both are seeking peace and relief of suffering.


    that is an amiable position for both. you should take your ques from them in proper behavior, attitude and in seeking of peace.
  11. Standard memberDasa
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    03 Sep '11 06:411 edit
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    Originally posted by Dasa
    I have not said they are the same.


    you aimed your criticism against buddhism in response to a post on daoism. you did not a single time refer to daoism anywhere in your response.

    it's not a wonder you have criticism against buddha. he rightly rejected vedic authority. and he was accepted as the inc th. you should take your ques from them in proper behavior, attitude and in seeking of peace.
    You have speculated like a true speculator believing Godhead is in competition with Godhead.

    Godhead plans for Buddha to appear to stop animal slaughter through the exploitation of Vedic ritual.

    And then Godhead incarnates as Lord Caitanya to revive Vedic authority.

    Your fault finding mentality will only lead you into speculation and fabrication. .

    Proper behaviour is to present truth no matter how unpalatable it is.
  12. Joined
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    03 Sep '11 17:11
    Originally posted by Dasa
    You have speculated like a true speculator believing Godhead is in competition with Godhead.

    Godhead plans for Buddha to appear to stop animal slaughter through the exploitation of Vedic ritual.

    And then Godhead incarnates as Lord Caitanya to revive Vedic authority.

    Your fault finding mentality will only lead you into speculation and fabrication. .

    Proper behaviour is to present truth no matter how unpalatable it is.
    "Proper behaviour is to present truth no matter how unpalatable it is."

    You must be a joy to live with.
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    03 Sep '11 20:18
    Originally posted by Dasa
    You have speculated like a true speculator believing Godhead is in competition with Godhead.


    i harbor no such beliefs. i merely expose the foolish beliefs of competing religions.



    Godhead plans for Buddha to appear to stop animal slaughter through the exploitation of Vedic ritual.

    And then Godhead incarnates as Lord Caitanya to revive Vedic authority.


    only according to some branches of religious speculation.



    Your fault finding mentality will only lead you into speculation and fabrication.


    that explains why your fault finding mentality against science has only lead you to speculation and fabrication in that field.



    Proper behaviour is to present truth no matter how unpalatable it is.[


    you need to reconsult the vedic speculations for statutes on proper behavior. maybe if we can find a real adherent of vedic traditions, he might be able instruct you, though i doubt he would be able to penetrate your ego.
  14. Melbourne, Australia
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    04 Sep '11 02:40
    Originally posted by Dasa
    So the meaning of life is to do your own thing.

    Your own thing then becomes your meaning.

    This is not correct but simply misdirecting persons.

    The meaning of human life is to re-establish the forgotten relationship with God.

    Our relationship with God is eternal and can never be broken.... but only forgotten.

    Not accepting God or the individual so ...[text shortened]... ddha is God incarnate but Buddhists deny God........this is clearly interesting.

    Namaste
    Namaste, Dasa.

    I actually have no problem with "...do your own thing then becomes your meaning".

    For, as you know, behind "your own thing " lies the different understandings of the existence of the self/Self, and how it is understood and lived.

    Taoism avoids defining the final nature of the Tao and accepts its final nature as the Mystery of mysteries. When we are truly "doing our own thing", in its eyes we are following our Tao and are acting in a manner that is seen as highly cultivated. We accord with our true nature. Of course, if you define "doing your own thing" as wildly acting without care, morality or reflection, this is definitely not what following one's Tao means.

    Nor is it seen that way in Buddhism. You define Buddhism as a form of atheism, as many do. I understand this to an overstatement of what the sages of Buddhism seek to convey, including Shakyamuni.

    For they essentially agree with Taoism in saying we are finally unable to declare that there is a Self, nor that there is not a Self.

    This, to me, is the meaning of Sunyata, or voidness - not that there is absolutely nothing whatsoever, but that the nature and form of whatever Self or entity may or may not be, it cannot be defined or set apart from everything else. Or stated more positively in the words of the Heart Sutra, "Form is emptiness, and emptiness is form".

    That which is "our own thing" in its truest sense is our Buddha nature, or in Taoism, our Way, a term often also used in Zen Buddhism, which found great affinity with the ancient understandings of Chinese Taoism.

    This is because they understand any and every entity, transcendent or earthly, mental or physical, any entity whatsoever, does not exist unto itself entirely, that God/Tao/Buddha Nature/Shiva/Allah/Vishnu/Creative Principle are ultimately all labels of the all interdependent mystery all of us seek to relate to and understand, (or deny certain understandings in their own journey of knowing and finding).

    Even In Hinduism, when the nature of this Self is portrayed, it is portrayed in a myriad of ways and there is deep debate amongst the various schools as to how to understand the Self that is constantly referred to.

    For instance, Brahman is commonly referred to as the Ultimate in Hindu traditional understandings. But when the nature of Brahman this "Self" of all, is studied closley and sought to be explained by Hindu sages actually start sounding like Buddhists and Taoists. I have read fine articles from both sides stating this.

    This to me is an indication that too much talk of Self/not Self is in the end supremely dualistic. We humans and our cognition and knowledge paths can't talk or understand anything without language and is essential differentiations.

    But The Source of All is "itself" everything, with nought outside of it. It is non-dual and a mystery, a mystery in which to live life to the fullest in some form or other to be related to in some way, even in an apparent atheistic way.

    Many an atheist loves beauty, literature and art and music,the wonders of nature, mathematics and science, enjoy and respond in creative and supportive ways to others and the world in "doing their own thing".

    When they are acting in response to the best within them, whether they see it or not, they are, in my eyes, following their Tao, bringing honour to Vishnu or Shiva or Buddha , God, Allah, or the Beloved.

    They bring honour unknowing to the highest mystery that can be seen as a Self, or "That", or the living Mysterious Way that unfolds and confronts and teaches as you "do your own thing".

    You are following your Tao right now. There is no final defined entity of authority whatsoever, save the "truth" that you see and actively follow right now. Hold, but do not hold tight, for it restricts the movement of "That" in one's life.

    Sounds a bit scary, but in fact it is wonderfully liberating and enables the fulfilling of our potentials, which are the creative potentials of the Great.

    This is how I see it at present.

    Namaste.
  15. Standard memberDasa
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    04 Sep '11 04:41
    Originally posted by Taoman
    Namaste, Dasa.

    I actually have no problem with "...do your own thing then becomes your meaning".

    For, as you know, behind "your own thing " lies the different understandings of the existence of the self/Self, and how it is understood and lived.

    Taoism avoids defining the final nature of the Tao and accepts its final nature as the Mystery of mysteries ...[text shortened]... tials of the Great.

    This is how I see it at present.

    Namaste.
    Yes of course behind your own thing comes different understanding and those understandings are always incomplete and in every case misleading.

    Hitler did his own thing and millions suffered.

    Islam is doing their own thing and people are being blown up in buses.

    So doing your own thing is condemned by the authority.

    When yo go to school you do not do your own thing but follow the school authority and everything goes along nicely.

    When you do your own thing then everything is a mystery but taking knowledge from the authority the mystery then becomes known.

    This mystery you talk of is really ignorance.......and people are saying its a mystery.

    I do not know because it,s a mystery.........No! its I do not know because of ignorance.

    They are turning ignorance into a mystery.

    Everyone takes knowledge from authority and that's how everyone has learnt their ABC,s but when God is the subject they reject authority.

    This is dishonesty.

    They accept every authority for everything they have aver learnt but reject spiritual authority for they are insincere and puffed up with self importance.

    And now they proclaim there is no God......its all foolishness.

    And if they say there is God they reject authority and invent there own religion that allows them to kill..........its all dishonest.
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