1. Felicific Forest
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    19 Feb '07 18:32
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
  2. CA, USA
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    19 Feb '07 18:40
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
    If rational means .. makes sense to me, then yes, from my experence forgiveness makes perfect sense.

    My reason being that holding onto bitter, resentful hatred only eats one up from the inside.

    Have your say and let it go.
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    19 Feb '07 18:56
    Originally posted by jammer
    If rational means .. makes sense to me, then yes, from my experence forgiveness makes perfect sense.

    My reason being that holding onto bitter, resentful hatred only eats one up from the inside.

    Have your say and let it go.
    Now, that is pure wisdom, right there. Have a rec. 🙂
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    19 Feb '07 19:07
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
    I'd say it's probably contextually relative.
  5. Felicific Forest
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    19 Feb '07 21:03
    Originally posted by Starrman
    I'd say it's probably contextually relative.
    ... and what does this mean ?
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    19 Feb '07 21:33
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    ... and what does this mean ?
    It means that sometimes I will be logical and forgiving, sometimes logical and not forgiving, sometimes illogical and forgiving, sometimes illogical and not forgiving. It depends on the context of the situation.
  7. Donationkirksey957
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    20 Feb '07 02:24
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
    It goes against reason and logic for me personally. I tend to hang on to anger and resentments, however, recently I tried to forgive someone whom I was really really mad at. As it turned out, we get along fine now. For me, forgiveness is mostly an effort that requires discipline and patience.
  8. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    20 Feb '07 03:57
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
    Yes. The iterated prisoner's dilemma shows why:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prisoner's_dilemma#The_iterated_prisoner.27s_dilemma
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    20 Feb '07 04:14
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
    I don't really understand the question. Are you asking if there are reasons to promote acts of forgiveness (whether the reasons be agent-neutral or agent-relative)?
  10. London
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    20 Feb '07 14:31
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Yes. The iterated prisoner's dilemma shows why:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prisoner's_dilemma#The_iterated_prisoner.27s_dilemma
    Do you believe that the IPD correctly captures the essence of most (all?) life situations calling for forgiveness?
  11. Felicific Forest
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    20 Feb '07 14:49
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    I don't really understand the question. Are you asking if there are reasons to promote acts of forgiveness (whether the reasons be agent-neutral or agent-relative)?
    Let's shake hands ! I don't understand your question either.
  12. Felicific Forest
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    20 Feb '07 14:51
    Originally posted by Starrman
    It means that sometimes I will be logical and forgiving, sometimes logical and not forgiving, sometimes illogical and forgiving, sometimes illogical and not forgiving. It depends on the context of the situation.
    Can you give an example of all four situations you describe ? ... and do you think that in this context being "RATIONAL" and being "LOGICAL" has exactly the same meaning ?
  13. Felicific Forest
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    20 Feb '07 14:551 edit
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    It goes against reason and logic for me personally. I tend to hang on to anger and resentments, however, recently I tried to forgive someone whom I was really really mad at. As it turned out, we get along fine now. For me, forgiveness is mostly an effort that requires discipline and patience.
    Kirk: "It goes against reason and logic for me personally"

    Does foregiving go against rationality stating that it goes against reason and logic ? In other words: Is forgiving "irrational" ?
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    20 Feb '07 15:00
    Originally posted by ivanhoe
    Is the act of forgiveness a rational or (?) logical act from the perspective of your own convictions, religious or secular ? Can you give an explanation or reasons for your stance ?
    I think this is difficult to answer as a general question. Are you talking about forgiving a friend or some stranger who has done something to you? Are you talking about a minor disagreement or some unpleasant act?
  15. Felicific Forest
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    20 Feb '07 15:04
    Originally posted by Ian68
    I think this is difficult to answer as a general question. Are you talking about forgiving a friend or some stranger who has done something to you? Are you talking about a minor disagreement or some unpleasant act?
    All of those. Why do you want to make these distinctions ? It is easier to forgive someone you love then someone you dislike. Is that the heart of your question ?
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