1. SubscriberFMF
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    26 Oct '12 03:422 edits
    "Eid al-Adha [meaning "festival of sacrifice"], also called Feast of the Sacrifice, the Major Festival, the Greater Eid and Id-ul-Zuha, is an important 4-day religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide to honor the willingness of the prophet Abraham to sacrifice his young firstborn son Ishmael a as an act of submission to God, and his son's acceptance of the sacrifice before God intervened to provide Abraham with a ram to sacrifice instead.

    Eid al-Adha is the latter of the two Eid holidays celebrated by Sunni and Shia Muslims, the former holiday being Eid al-Fitr. The basis for the Eid al-Adha comes from the 196th verse of the 2nd sura of the Quran. The word "Eid" appears once in the 5th sura of the Quran, with the meaning "solemn festival". The 3 days and 2 nights of Eid al-Adha are celebrated annually on the 10th, 11th and 12th day Dhu al-Hijjah, the twelfth and last month of the lunar Islamic calendar. In the international Gregorian calendar, the dates vary from year to year, drifting approximately 11 days earlier each year.

    Like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha begins with a Sunnah prayer of two rakats followed by a sermon. Eid al-Adha celebrations start after the descent of the Hajj from Mount Arafat, a hill east of Mecca. Ritual observance of the holiday lasts until sunset of the 12th day of Dhu al-Hijjah. Eid sacrifice may take place until sunset on the 13th Day. The days of Eid have been singled out in the Hadith as "days of remembrance". The days of Tashriq are from the Fajr of the 9th of Dhul Hijjah upto the Asr of the 13th of Dhul Hijjah (5 days and 4 nights). This equals 23 prayers: 5 on the 9th-12th which equal 20 and 3 on the 13th." [wiki]

    10 am this morning, I could scarcely find a shop open anywhere.

    Best wishes to all posters and chess players on this web site for whom today is a special day of religious commemoration.
  2. Cape Town
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    26 Oct '12 05:30
    Originally posted by FMF
    10 am this morning, I could scarcely find a shop open anywhere.
    Here in Cape Town, it is not a public holiday, but the Muslims don't go to school or to work so Eid is always a slow day. I think they should make it a public holiday.
  3. Standard memberblack beetle
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    26 Oct '12 05:51
    Originally posted by FMF
    "Eid al-Adha [meaning "festival of sacrifice"], also called Feast of the Sacrifice, the Major Festival, the Greater Eid and Id-ul-Zuha, is an important 4-day religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide to honor the willingness of the prophet Abraham to sacrifice his young firstborn son Ishmael a as an act of submission to God, and his son's acceptance of t ...[text shortened]... players on this web site for whom today is a special day of religious commemoration.
    Methinks Eid al-Adha proves that the Qur'an in fact introduced a conflict as to which son of Abraham was truly the so called “son of promise”. The Hebrew Bible says it was Isaac. The Qur'an says it was Ishmael. The Qur'an teaches that it was Ishmael the son who was asked to be sacrificed to the Lord by Abraham, not Isaac (in contradiction to Genesis chapter 22). Why so? Which way your Muslim friends explain this approach over who was the son of promise? This approach still contributes to the hostility today; many people from both sides are ready to die on the spot over a myth. How sad.

    Parenthesis: at one point the Qur’an leads the Muslims to behave to the Jews as if they were their brothers, and at another point it instructs Muslims to attack the Jews who refuse to convert to Islam. For thousands of years the Jews and the Arabs lived in relative peace and indifference towards each other. After the Second World War, when the UN gave a portion of the land of Israel to the Jews, the country was at that time basically inhabited by Arabs, by Palestinians, that is. Most Arabs protested violently against the nation of Israel, which occupied the country. Arab nations united and attacked Israel in an attempt to drive them out of the country, and they were defeated by Israel. Till today we notice great hostility between Israel and the neighboring Arab nations (Jordan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Egypt, and recently Iran).
    Parenthesis closed, back to the ancient myth: according to the Bible, Israel has a right to exist as a nation in its own country, which was given by G-d to the descendants of Jacob, Abraham's grandson (and at the same time, Israel should seek peace and respect its Arab neighbors -Psalm 122:6). But according to the Qur’an, this is just not the case.

    Methinks it is not amazing the fact that the Jews see Eid al-Adha with, say, suspicion. As for me, I merely see two enemies ready to slain each other in no time, both with the “excuse” that G-d/ Allah is by their side. Methinks this “special day of religious commemoration” is in fact a special day of commemoration of just another man-made myth and religious hatred.
  4. SubscriberFMF
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    26 Oct '12 06:00
    Originally posted by black beetle
    Methinks this “special day of religious commemoration” is in fact a special day of commemoration of just another man-made myth and religious hatred.
    All religious commemorations are celebrations of man-made myths as far as I am concerned. If you want to withhold your good wishes on this particular day on account of "hatred", then that is your prerogative.
  5. Standard memberblack beetle
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    26 Oct '12 06:08
    Originally posted by FMF
    All religious commemorations are celebrations of man-made myths as far as I am concerned. If you want to withhold your good wishes on this particular day on account of "hatred", then that is your prerogative.
    To express or not to express good wishes as regards delusional approaches, is itself nonsensical to me😵
  6. SubscriberFMF
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    26 Oct '12 06:26
    Originally posted by black beetle
    To express or not to express good wishes as regards delusional approaches, is itself nonsensical to me😵
    I see. Well you're pointedly choosing not to express good wishes in this instance. Is it then an example of you being "nonsensical"? 😀
  7. Standard memberblack beetle
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    26 Oct '12 06:31
    Originally posted by FMF
    I see. Well you're pointedly choosing not to express good wishes in this instance. Is it then an example of you being "nonsensical"? 😀
    Nope, I am pointedly choosing neither to express nor to express not good wishes in this instance. This is an example of this bug being non nonsensical😵
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    26 Oct '12 06:35
    Originally posted by FMF
    I see. Well you're pointedly choosing not to express good wishes in this instance. Is it then an example of you being "nonsensical"? 😀
    Is there a common greeting for this part of the Islamic calender, i.e how would you commonly a greet a Muslim if you wanted to acknowledge their celebration.
  9. SubscriberFMF
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    26 Oct '12 06:42
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    Is there a common greeting for this part of the Islamic calender, i.e how would you commonly a greet a Muslim if you wanted to acknowledge their celebration.
    I have received several food packets from neighbours already today and I just tend to say "Selamat Idul Adha". "Selamat" means greetings or congratulations ["Selamat Natal" more or less means merry Christmas, for example]. The kampong is cluttered with cars, many with out of town number plates, as families gather for the long weekend. I will do some rounds of my own later with my kids and pop in to say hello and offer my best wishes.
  10. SubscriberFMF
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    26 Oct '12 06:45
    Originally posted by black beetle
    Nope, I am pointedly choosing neither to express nor to express not good wishes in this instance. This is an example of this bug being non nonsensical😵
    I can understand there being good wishes and I can understand an absence of good wishes. But you have discovered a third kind which is neither of these?
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    26 Oct '12 07:40
    Originally posted by FMF
    I have received several food packets from neighbours already today and I just tend to say "Selamat Idul Adha". "Selamat" means greetings or congratulations ["Selamat Natal" more or less means merry Christmas, for example]. The kampong is cluttered with cars, many with out of town number plates, as families gather for the long weekend. I will do some rounds of my own later with my kids and pop in to say hello and offer my best wishes.
    Sounds like fun, enjoy, I think at the very least we can all celebrate the promise of four days respite for the people of Syria.

    www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20066613
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    26 Oct '12 08:531 edit
    Originally posted by black beetle
    Methinks Eid al-Adha proves that the Qur'an in fact introduced a conflict as to which son of Abraham was truly the so called “son of promise”. The Hebrew Bible says it was Isaac. The Qur'an says it was Ishmael. The Qur'an teaches that it was Ishmael the son who was asked to be sacrificed to the Lord by Abraham, not Isaac (in contradiction to Genesis cha s in fact a special day of commemoration of just another man-made myth and religious hatred.
    Indeed its rather interesting that all the prophets regraded as prophets by both Jews
    and Muhammadans came from the lineage of Israel, for example Moses, Jonah, Jesus
    etc etc and that there should suddenly arise, without precedent, one from the line of
    Ishmael is suspicious to say the least. There is some difference of opinion among
    Pakistani Christians whether one should accept these ' Eid gifts', on account of certain
    Biblical passages, notably, 1 Corinthians 10:28 and the controversy is even greater on
    its doctrinal significance, because of course Christians see in the the Biblical account of
    Isaac and Abraham a prophetic drama, a type for the sacrifice of the Christ, whereas
    Muslims are at want to explain the significance of Abraham and Ishmael, for they have
    no concept of a propitiatory sacrifice.
  13. Standard memberblack beetle
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    26 Oct '12 10:13
    Originally posted by FMF
    I can understand there being good wishes and I can understand an absence of good wishes. But you have discovered a third kind which is neither of these?
    Yes, but the... discovery is not mine. This approach is not Aristotlean, it belongs to the Indian Logic (you may check the catuskoti, the Nagarjunean Diamond Slivers and the saptabhangi).

    So:
    Good wishes from me as regards this matter, it cannot be said that were promoted (since I expressed not good wishes).
    Good wishes from me as regards this matter, it cannot be said that were not promoted (since I expressed not no good wishes).
    Good wishes from me as regards this matter, it cannot be said that was both promoted and not promoted (since I expressed not good wishes and no good wishes at the same time).

    Therefore, good wishes from me as regards this matter, it can be said that was neither promoted nor not promoted (since I expressed neither good wishes nor no good wishes)
    😵
  14. Standard memberblack beetle
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    26 Oct '12 10:14
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Indeed its rather interesting that all the prophets regraded as prophets by both Jews
    and Muhammadans came from the lineage of Israel, for example Moses, Jonah, Jesus
    etc etc and that there should suddenly arise, without precedent, one from the line of
    Ishmael is suspicious to say the least. There is some difference of opinion among
    Pakistan ...[text shortened]... e significance of Abraham and Ishmael, for they have
    no concept of a propitiatory sacrifice.
    We agree😵
  15. Subscribersonhouse
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    26 Oct '12 10:38
    Seems like a sick holiday to me. This so-called god stopping the killing of the son in a sacrifice but says, ok, you can kill this goat instead. Just the kind of thing you want to hear from a god, its ok to kill.

    To me it smacks of being man made, not something from a god.

    Why wouldn't that so-called god just say, ok guys, I see you like me, lets all have a cup of wine and celebrate the love of life?
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