1. Joined
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    04 Aug '11 15:21
    Just a quick link before I dash for the train so no time for a comment about it.

    http://i.imgur.com/rADvk.png

    It's a short couple of paragraphs describing an intelligent young person.

    --- Penguin.
  2. Territories Unknown
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    04 Aug '11 15:35
    Originally posted by Penguin
    Just a quick link before I dash for the train so no time for a comment about it.

    http://i.imgur.com/rADvk.png

    It's a short couple of paragraphs describing an intelligent young person.

    --- Penguin.
    I think that parents have wisely conspired to perpetuate the idea of magic, of things unexplained/inexplicable to their children--- and those children to their children and so on and so forth--- for some very compelling reasons.

    I also think that parents have been guilty of not providing their children with the truth about God. Parents--- for the most part--- are the laziest and worst theologians possible. They know less about God than they do about the characters in Lost or Seinfeld.

    When children begin thinking magic is not possible, that fairies don't exist but at the same time do not have biblical truth about the spiritual world, it is a sad, sad day indeed.
  3. Joined
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    04 Aug '11 15:40
    Originally posted by Penguin
    Just a quick link before I dash for the train so no time for a comment about it.

    http://i.imgur.com/rADvk.png

    It's a short couple of paragraphs describing an intelligent young person.

    --- Penguin.
    Smart little lad.

    There is a similar principle that can be witnessed in a relationship with God. There are those who make their needs known to other people and are grateful when someone provides; and there are those who choose to make their needs known only to God.
  4. Joined
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    04 Aug '11 18:21
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    I think that parents have wisely conspired to perpetuate the idea of magic, of things unexplained/inexplicable to their children--- and those children to their children and so on and so forth--- for some very compelling reasons.

    I also think that parents have been guilty of not providing their children with the truth about God. Parents--- for the most ...[text shortened]... he same time do not have biblical truth about the spiritual world, it is a sad, sad day indeed.
    I remember being crushed when I realized that Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck weren't real, and I hadn't been told by any grown-ups that they were or weren't real. It just didn't make sense, anymore. (I hope this doesn't come as a shock to anyone.)

    Children start out their lives in a magical world, without any prompting from parents, and dis-illusionment is part of growing up.

    Would it be dishonest and bad parenting to engage in your little girl's tea party with imaginary tea, or help her put her doll to bed? The kids initiate these things. Playing make-believe is apparently a healthy part of growing up.

    I wonder if there are examples of children being raised with consistent denial of their fantasies.
  5. Cape Town
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    04 Aug '11 19:17
    Originally posted by JS357
    I wonder if there are examples of children being raised with consistent denial of their fantasies.
    I never taught my son that Santa Claus or the tooth fairy were real. I do not remember believing in them as a child, despite my parents attempts. Maybe it was because I had older siblings who knew better.
    In general, I do not believe in lying to children.
  6. Joined
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    04 Aug '11 19:24
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I never taught my son that Santa Claus or the tooth fairy were real. I do not remember believing in them as a child, despite my parents attempts. Maybe it was because I had older siblings who knew better.
    In general, I do not believe in lying to children.
    I agree. Encouraging children to believe in Santa is done for the benefit of the parents "fun" not for the kids themselves. My sisters and I were always told Santa didn't exist; I don't remember Christmas being any the less fun for knowing that.
  7. Standard memberPalynka
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    04 Aug '11 19:471 edit
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    I think that parents have wisely conspired to perpetuate the idea of magic, of things unexplained/inexplicable to their children--- and those children to their children and so on and so forth--- for some very compelling reasons.

    I also think that parents have been guilty of not providing their children with the truth about God. Parents--- for the most he same time do not have biblical truth about the spiritual world, it is a sad, sad day indeed.
    😵

    Edit - Nice post, Penguin.
  8. Donationbbarr
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    04 Aug '11 20:10
    Originally posted by Penguin
    Just a quick link before I dash for the train so no time for a comment about it.

    http://i.imgur.com/rADvk.png

    It's a short couple of paragraphs describing an intelligent young person.

    --- Penguin.
    I was 8, and went to church with my Baptist grandmother. The sermon was fire and brimstone stuff, and we were told to look around at the people near to us; our loved ones, and realize that some of them would be going to Hell. God seemed monstrous. But the world was too good for God to be a monster, and the world was too bad for God to be truly loving. So, I concluded that either there was no God or He was a mixed bag. And if He's a mixed bag, then He is not deserving of worship. So, the whole question just became irrelevant to me.
  9. Joined
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    04 Aug '11 21:28
    And coming back to this now I am home and at the computer, I don't ever recall really believing in Saint Nick or the tooth fairy so I guess any belief must have been gone by 6 or 7. I do remember refusing to go to a church service (probably Christmas or Easter since those were the only ones we tended to have to go to) when I was around 8 or 9.

    --- Penguin.
  10. Standard memberSoothfast
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    05 Aug '11 05:16
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    I think that parents have wisely conspired to perpetuate the idea of magic, of things unexplained/inexplicable to their children--- and those children to their children and so on and so forth--- for some very compelling reasons.

    I also think that parents have been guilty of not providing their children with the truth about God. Parents--- for the most ...[text shortened]... he same time do not have biblical truth about the spiritual world, it is a sad, sad day indeed.
    When you cannot perceive the magic in those things known to exist, in the things extant in this universe—from the nearest quark to the farthest quasar—that, I daresay, is the saddest state of affairs of all...
  11. Subscribersonhouse
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    05 Aug '11 19:17
    Originally posted by Penguin
    Just a quick link before I dash for the train so no time for a comment about it.

    http://i.imgur.com/rADvk.png

    It's a short couple of paragraphs describing an intelligent young person.

    --- Penguin.
    Excellent! He rightly has suspicions about the whole tooth fairy thing and decided to run an experiment. Scientific thinking for someone so young!
  12. Illinois
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    06 Aug '11 06:50
    My daughter (6) recently asked me—out of nowhere—why God, if He cares about us, might let bad things happen to us. I was totally blind-sided by the question and didn't feel I could give her a satisfactory response. And if you can't explain it so a child can understand it, most likely you don't understand it yourself. I managed a, "Well... humans are in a tough spot, Kiddo... but, thankfully, this life isn't all there is." I was raised in a non-religious home and was an atheist agnostic until I was in my mid-twenties, so I feel comfortable with the idea of giving my daughter the freedom to choose her own way, but it would definitely feel as if I were lying to her if I didn't share with her what I now believe to be the Truth, i.e., Christ. On the other hand, neither do I like the idea of discouraging skepticism. Faith ought to be come by honestly, through a furnace of doubt and questioning, or not at all. My hope is that the integrity of my life will be all the testimony she needs, but even that may not be enough. Regardless, at all costs I mean to protect the sanctity of her mind. Not many six year-olds raise the problem of evil, and, frankly, it makes me proud.
  13. SubscriberFMF
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    06 Aug '11 13:38
    Originally posted by epiphinehas
    "Well... humans are in a tough spot, Kiddo... but, thankfully, this life isn't all there is." I was raised in a non-religious home and was an atheist agnostic until I was in my mid-twenties, so I feel comfortable with the idea of giving my daughter the freedom to choose her own way, but it would definitely feel as if I were lying to her if I didn't share with her what I now believe to be the Truth, i.e., Christ.
    You filled the head of a 6 year old with speculations and hopes-for-immortality that you yourself decided to subscribe to only in your mid-20s? I don't see how trying to simplify your theories about the supernatural, and feeding them to her, squares with your desire to "protect the sanctity of her mind".
  14. Cape Town
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    06 Aug '11 15:29
    Originally posted by epiphinehas
    ... and didn't feel I could give her a satisfactory response.
    I think we all need to learn to admit when we don't know the answer. Too many parents just make up a lie rather than admit not knowing the truth. I know I have done it in the past and often have to fight the urge to do so, but I do try to avoid it.

    Interestingly this behavior is not restricted to Adult / Child relationships. Many theists will rarely admit ignorance regarding a religious matter and will make something up on the spur of the moment when asked. I think it is a case of humans being ready to lie to save face if they think they can get away with it - and one can usually get away with it if your questioner is a child, or if the topic is religion since anything goes when it comes to religion.
  15. Territories Unknown
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    06 Aug '11 18:00
    Originally posted by bbarr
    I was 8, and went to church with my Baptist grandmother. The sermon was fire and brimstone stuff, and we were told to look around at the people near to us; our loved ones, and realize that some of them would be going to Hell. God seemed monstrous. But the world was too good for God to be a monster, and the world was too bad for God to be truly loving. So, ...[text shortened]... bag, then He is not deserving of worship. So, the whole question just became irrelevant to me.
    Your highly intuitive eight year old self serves as a case in point for part of my statement. Had anyone around you (including the pastor) been equipped with doctrine, they would have been able to explain how the will of God is running co-terminus with the will of man, thereby clearing up any seeming contradictions to the goodness of God.
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