1. Cape Town
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    17 Jan '12 12:451 edit
    Originally posted by josephw
    Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
    Does that not contradict your opening quote? Or are happiness and well-being not 'pleasure'? Or is there some other purpose for seeking them via meditation?

    For whose sake should one seek pleasure, or should we not seek it at all?
  2. Standard memberblack beetle
    Black Beastie
    Scheveningen
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    17 Jan '12 19:19
    Originally posted by josephw
    Dokkodo

    Accept everything just the way it is.
    Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
    Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.
    Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.
    Be detached from desire your whole life long.
    Do not regret what you have done.
    Never be jealous.
    Never let yourself be saddened by a separation. ...[text shortened]... g with pain and illness, and the prospect of death.

    I would greatly appreciate your feedback.
    Pain, Illness, Suffering, Death... Whatever: Accept everything just the way it is.
    😵
  3. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 00:49
    Originally posted by josephw
    Dokkodo

    Accept everything just the way it is.
    Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
    Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.
    Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.
    Be detached from desire your whole life long.
    Do not regret what you have done.
    Never be jealous.
    Never let yourself be saddened by a separation. ...[text shortened]... g with pain and illness, and the prospect of death.

    I would greatly appreciate your feedback.
    this philosophy of musashi was very dao-centric. it's not perfect because it's not for everyone. it's the way of walking alone and few people are willing to walk alone. it's a way for spiritual warriors.
  4. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 00:571 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Does that not contradict your opening quote? Or are happiness and well-being not 'pleasure'? Or is there some other purpose for seeking them via meditation?

    For whose sake should one seek pleasure, or should we not seek it at all?
    given the daoist mentality at work in relation to the rest of the precepts, a likely interpretation of this would be to find pleasure in the things you do /[edit] and have rather than seek out pleasure specifically, as a goal.
  5. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 01:07
    Originally posted by josephw
    I would be grateful to all that would seek to add to this subject any positive remarks and contribution they can make. I believe in the power of meditation regardless of one's spiritual perspective. I am providing a link I hope you will take a few minutes to read. Afterward, I would be happy to read any thoughts you may have concerning the technique and bene ...[text shortened]... find something solid within that you can depend on no matter what happens to the body."[/b]
    I read the article. It has some good points. On the other hand, it has a bunch of nonsense, too, such as this: "As I said earlier, one of the important stages of meditation is when you discover within the mind a knowing core that does not die at the death of the body."
  6. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 01:58
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Does that not contradict your opening quote? Or are happiness and well-being not 'pleasure'? Or is there some other purpose for seeking them via meditation?

    For whose sake should one seek pleasure, or should we not seek it at all?
    You misunderstand. That list was not mine. I apologize for not putting it in quotes. That particular post was directed toward black beetle who I assumed would know.

    I would ask that you refer to the OP and make your contributing reply to the topic.
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    18 Jan '12 02:05
    Originally posted by black beetle
    Pain, Illness, Suffering, Death... Whatever: Accept everything just the way it is.
    😵
    Is that what you would say to someone you knew may suffer and possibly die?

    Do you think meditation would help ease pain and even affect a recovery?
  8. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 02:05
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    I read the article. It has some good points. On the other hand, it has a bunch of nonsense, too, such as this: "As I said earlier, one of the important stages of meditation is when you discover within the mind a knowing core that does not die at the death of the body."
    i think what [successful] meditation does is cut off the conscious brain from the nervous system. this gives you a feeling of floating in nothing which can be interpreted as attaining nirvana or having a spiritual experience. in some forms of meditation like kundalini, when the brain tries to reestablish connection to the nervous system, you get mental spasms which are interpreted as the kundalini serpent.
  9. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 02:10
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    this philosophy of musashi was very dao-centric. it's not perfect because it's not for everyone. it's the way of walking alone and few people are willing to walk alone. it's a way for spiritual warriors.
    Perhaps I should take a closer look at it. Sounds interesting.
    I only just came across Dokkodo after googling it when bb posted the word.
  10. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 02:11
    Originally posted by josephw
    Perhaps I should take a closer look at it. Sounds interesting.
    I only just came across Dokkodo after googling it when bb posted the word.
    it might interest you to know that the person who wrote that was a cold blooded killer.
  11. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 02:13
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    I read the article. It has some good points. On the other hand, it has a bunch of nonsense, too, such as this: "As I said earlier, one of the important stages of meditation is when you discover within the mind a knowing core that does not die at the death of the body."
    I saw that, but elected not to use it because I wanted to focus more on the benefit of meditation as it relates to illness.
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    18 Jan '12 02:22
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    it might interest you to know that the person who wrote that was a cold blooded killer.
    How so?
  13. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
    Brisbane,QLD
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    18 Jan '12 02:25
    Originally posted by josephw
    Dokkodo

    Accept everything just the way it is.
    Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
    Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.
    Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.
    Be detached from desire your whole life long.
    Do not regret what you have done.
    Never be jealous.
    Never let yourself be saddened by a separation. ...[text shortened]... g with pain and illness, and the prospect of death.

    I would greatly appreciate your feedback.
    There's a big business in selling medicines. "They" want to keep us sick.
  14. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
    Brisbane,QLD
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    18 Jan '12 02:28
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    this philosophy of musashi was very dao-centric. it's not perfect because it's not for everyone. it's the way of walking alone and few people are willing to walk alone. it's a way for spiritual warriors.
    I am curious as to know whether someone like RJHinds would understand the term "spiritual warrior"?
  15. Joined
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    18 Jan '12 02:28
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    i think what [successful] meditation does is cut off the conscious brain from the nervous system. this gives you a feeling of floating in nothing which can be interpreted as attaining nirvana or having a spiritual experience. in some forms of meditation like kundalini, when the brain tries to reestablish connection to the nervous system, you get mental spasms which are interpreted as the kundalini serpent.
    That's quite odd. How can meditation allow for the brain to be "cut off" from the nervous system?

    It's hard wired.
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