1. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    29 Jun '09 11:421 edit
    'metal fatigue' is the term given to metals which 'break down' unexpectedly and with no good reason. (do i have that right?)
    I have heard it put that these 'molecules' aren't just tired. They are plain fed up!
    (fed up with serving military forces,generally destructive stuff,etc.)
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    29 Jun '09 11:54
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    'metal fatigue' is the term given to metals which 'break down' unexpectedly and with no good reason. (do i have that right?)
    I have heard it put that these 'molecules' aren't just tired. They are plain fed up!
    (fed up with serving military forces,generally destructive stuff,etc.)
    Well no.

    You could always look it up. Or if you are after a proper answer, post it in the Science forum.

    Here's a one-screen answer though:

    http://materials.open.ac.uk/mem/mem_mftext.htm

    It's just the standard way that most materials wear out and eventually fail when subjected to mechanical and thermal stress.

    --- Panguin.
  3. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    29 Jun '09 11:58
    Originally posted by Penguin
    Well no.

    You could always look it up. Or if you are after a proper answer, post it in the Science forum.

    Here's a one-screen answer though:

    http://materials.open.ac.uk/mem/mem_mftext.htm

    It's just the standard way that most materials wear out and eventually fail when subjected to mechanical and thermal stress.

    --- Panguin.
    WHY the term 'metal fatigue'? I thought it was to explain something un-explainable that had 'happened' to the metal in question?
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    29 Jun '09 13:13
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    WHY the term 'metal fatigue'? I thought it was to explain something un-explainable that had 'happened' to the metal in question?
    Maybe we use the term because it is part of the dictionary definition of the word?
    From Marriam Webster:
    3: the tendency of a material to break under repeated stress <metal fatigue>
    The origin of that definition is probably simply an analogy to human weariness. Seems perfectly reasonable to me, and I don't see any reason to believe that anything un-explainable had anything to do with it.
  5. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    29 Jun '09 13:26
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Maybe we use the term because it is part of the dictionary definition of the word?
    From Marriam Webster:
    3: the tendency of a material to break under repeated stress <metal fatigue>
    The origin of that definition is probably simply an analogy to human weariness. Seems perfectly reasonable to me, and I don't see any reason to believe that anything un-explainable had anything to do with it.
    Aarr, there you are, my reality checking friend.
    So i guess you cant have concioussness ascribed to a molecule?
    Silly me . Why would i have ever thought that.
    Just give me one example and I'll leave it.
    (not a link, your own words please)
  6. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    29 Jun '09 13:351 edit
    I'm sure you out there in cyberland have noticed i have a tendency to write about controversial( if not downright 'unbelievable' ) topics.
    I assure you that each of my posts is well-measured. Usually i talk about my own experiences however every now and then i will put in something i have read or heard. This is because it 'resonates' with me .
    I hear the information and 'something' , 'indicates' to me that this may be a worthy line of enquiry.
    There will always be doubters, but other than pointing out the implausible, what can they offer themselves? A cold, hard phyisically orientated universe with a few minor defects?
  7. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    29 Jun '09 16:381 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Maybe we use the term because it is part of the dictionary definition of the word?
    From Marriam Webster:
    3: the tendency of a material to break under repeated stress <metal fatigue>
    The origin of that definition is probably simply an analogy to human weariness. Seems perfectly reasonable to me, and I don't see any reason to believe that anything un-explainable had anything to do with it.
    'metal-fatigue' has been cited as the problem for mechanical parts wearing out.
    'Repeated stress' does not cut it.
    Why would they say 'metal-fatigue' if there is a better explanation?
    Would not they say 'repeated stress'?
    This term has been made up, I assume to get around a lot of law-suits.
    and this is just what they are telling us..
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    29 Jun '09 17:54
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    'metal-fatigue' has been cited as the problem for mechanical parts wearing out.
    'Repeated stress' does not cut it.
    Why would they say 'metal-fatigue' if there is a better explanation?
    Would not they say 'repeated stress'?
    This term has been made up, I assume to get around a lot of law-suits.
    and this is just what they are telling us..
    the proper term, is the ductility of metals, which i recall from a subject at school we had, called engineering science, or applied mechanics, it was like physics but was always applied to some purpose. it is really important, for metals have a tendency to fracture or rupture , depending on their ductility or elasticity, as I recall, thus aeroplanes wings and helicopters blades must be constantly monitored due to the risk of fracture through repeated vibration caused by turbulence, air friction etc etc. depending on the metal itself and its properties, i am sure there are ways in which one can increase a metals hardness, heating it to a certain point and then cooling it rapidly, but i cannot remember if one can increase the ductility in this way, it was such a long time ago 🙂
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    29 Jun '09 19:39
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Aarr, there you are, my reality checking friend.
    So i guess you cant have concioussness ascribed to a molecule?
    Silly me . Why would i have ever thought that.
    Just give me one example and I'll leave it.
    (not a link, your own words please)
    Is English your first language? You don't appear to be understanding what I am saying or even what 'fatigue' means in every day English.

    I really don't know where conciousness comes into it nor why you think it can be ascribed to a molecule.

    Most metals can bend. Different metals (or alloys) bend in different ways, some are springy and bounce back after being bend, some are quite maleable and can be bent into various shapes without breaking, and some are very brittle and will crack when bent.
    Metal fatigue is when a metal has been bent a number of times and tiny cracks develp which can eventually lead to it breaking under futher stress. Thats all it is. Nothing mysterious, at all.
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    29 Jun '09 19:441 edit
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    depending on the metal itself and its properties, i am sure there are ways in which one can increase a metals hardness, heating it to a certain point and then cooling it rapidly, but i cannot remember if one can increase the ductility in this way, it was such a long time ago 🙂
    One way is mixing various metals (alloys) or including other substances such as carbon (steel is harder than Iron because of the carbon content).
    Another way is by repeatedly hammering out and folding as this aligns all the grains in the metal in one direction which affects its properties.
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    29 Jun '09 20:091 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    One way is mixing various metals (alloys) or including other substances such as carbon (steel is harder than Iron because of the carbon content).
    Another way is by repeatedly hammering out and folding as this aligns all the grains in the metal in one direction which affects its properties.
    Lol, take it to the science forum Spanky! only kidding Whitey my friend, yes i suspected this, that by mixing metal, all sorts of interesting things may happen, once i saw an excellent documentary on how they make the samurai sword, and it demonstrated the methods of folding and hammering to achieve elasticity and strength.
  12. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    29 Jun '09 22:12
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Is English your first language? You don't appear to be understanding what I am saying or even what 'fatigue' means in every day English.

    I really don't know where conciousness comes into it nor why you think it can be ascribed to a molecule.

    Most metals can bend. Different metals (or alloys) bend in different ways, some are springy and bounce back a ...[text shortened]... tually lead to it breaking under futher stress. Thats all it is. Nothing mysterious, at all.
    I've read stories. About miltary operations.
    Why cant metal have concioussness ascribed to it?
    Because we would have to re-write a whole bunch of science books.
    If we destroy just one atom what happens? A nuclear reaction right?
    Every little paricle must be accounted for to keep our life-support systems in balance.
    As for the concioussness of a particle, who knows? I am open to the possibilty...
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    06 Jul '09 13:40
    "Why cant metal have concioussness ascribed to it?" Because metal is not alive.
  14. Standard memberPalynka
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    06 Jul '09 13:42
    Originally posted by daniel58
    "Why cant metal have concioussness ascribed to it?" Because metal is not alive.
    Definite life/being alive in a non-circular way.
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    06 Jul '09 13:53
    False.
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