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    09 May '11 06:56
    Yesterday the wife and I and two friends were on the terrace of the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice to observe Pope Benedict XVI's procession on the Grand Canal. As he passed by, he was blessing everyone along the route. What do people think the significance of his blessing is to a Catholic, a non-Catholic Christian, a non-Christian believer, a non-believer, etc.? Does it confer anything in particular that a blessing form someone else would not?

    The pageantry of the flotilla of multi-manned gondolas and mahogany cruisers that followed, was fantastic.
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    Doug Stanhope
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    09 May '11 06:58
    His blessing is of equal worth to mine. Christ left no vicars. Universal
    priesthood rules.

    Hence, my brother, right now I bless you in the name of Jesus Christ.
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    09 May '11 06:591 edit
    Originally posted by JS357
    Yesterday the wife and I and two friends were on the terrace of the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice to observe Pope Benedict XVI's procession on the Grand Canal. As he passed by, he was blessing everyone along the route. What do people think the significance of his blessing is to a Catholic, a non-Catholic Christian, a non-Christian believer, a non-believer, ...[text shortened]... ry of the flotilla of multi-manned gondolas and mahogany cruisers that followed, was fantastic.
    this i think is part of the attraction for the catholic, although it seems to me that such
    pageantry relies heavily upon visual elements rather than purely spiritual ones. If he
    had been throwing away twenty pound notes, that would have been excellent, as it
    stands, the practical benefits of being blessed seem to me to be quite minimal. Were
    you yourself inspired by it?
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    Doug Stanhope
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    09 May '11 07:10
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    If he
    had been throwing away twenty pound notes
    Is that the price of your soul?

    Some wouldn't do it for less than € 5,000 checks 😛
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    09 May '11 09:582 edits
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Is that the price of your soul?

    Some wouldn't do it for less than € 5,000 checks 😛
    the price of my soul is £3.99, buy one get one free 🙂 every little bit helps, he can after
    all afford to give away id say 50 million every day for a week without even noticing it.
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    Doug Stanhope
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    09 May '11 10:10
    lol
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    09 May '11 10:12
    Originally posted by Seitse
    lol
    what do you think Seitse, is it true that every man has a price?

    (Job 2:4) . . .: “Skin in behalf of skin, and everything that a man has he will give in
    behalf of his soul. . .
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    09 May '11 10:52
    Originally posted by JS357
    Yesterday the wife and I and two friends were on the terrace of the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice to observe Pope Benedict XVI's procession on the Grand Canal. As he passed by, he was blessing everyone along the route. What do people think the significance of his blessing is to a Catholic, a non-Catholic Christian, a non-Christian believer, a non-believer, ...[text shortened]... ry of the flotilla of multi-manned gondolas and mahogany cruisers that followed, was fantastic.
    For a Catholic, yes, the blessing does confer certain spiritual gifts. I rather suspect a partial indulgence might be available for such an occasion too. It is important to stress however that the efficacy of the blessing does not depend on the particular status of the priest but on the faith of the believer. Theoretically, the blessing of one's own biological father could be more effective than a papal blessing.
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    Doug Stanhope
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    09 May '11 11:19
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    what do you think Seitse, is it true that every man has a price?

    (Job 2:4) . . .: “Skin in behalf of skin, and everything that a man has he will give in
    behalf of his soul. . .
    Gee, let's not forget how Job ends up swallowing his words... but
    healed, multiplied and very, very happy.
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    09 May '11 19:03
    Originally posted by Conrau K
    For a Catholic, yes, the blessing does confer certain spiritual gifts. I rather suspect a partial indulgence might be available for such an occasion too. It is important to stress however that the efficacy of the blessing does not depend on the particular status of the priest but on the faith of the believer. Theoretically, the blessing of one's own biological father could be more effective than a papal blessing.
    Why is it even necassary? The Bible calls us all brothers and one should not be above another and if anything we should act as servants to our brothers as Jesus even did himself by washing the feet of the apostles.
    I wonder if the Pope would do that?
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    09 May '11 20:29
    Originally posted by galveston75
    Why is it even necassary? The Bible calls us all brothers and one should not be above another and if anything we should act as servants to our brothers as Jesus even did himself by washing the feet of the apostles.
    I wonder if the Pope would do that?
    Why is it even necassary?

    It isn't necessary. Most people go their whole lives without a papal blessing.

    Why is it even necassary? The Bible calls us all brothers and one should not be above another and if anything we should act as servants to our brothers as Jesus even did himself by washing the feet of the apostles.

    The act of blessing is an ancient practice. It was entrusted to the Aaronite priesthood (Num. 6: 23-6)

    I wonder if the Pope would do that?

    Of course. During the Easter celebrations, the Pope will wash the feet of twelve lay people in Rome. It is part of the ritual.
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    09 May '11 21:01
    Originally posted by JS357
    Yesterday the wife and I and two friends were on the terrace of the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice to observe Pope Benedict XVI's procession on the Grand Canal. As he passed by, he was blessing everyone along the route. What do people think the significance of his blessing is to a Catholic, a non-Catholic Christian, a non-Christian believer, a non-believer, ...[text shortened]... ry of the flotilla of multi-manned gondolas and mahogany cruisers that followed, was fantastic.
    Philippians 3:8 - Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ,

    Well, when I see a Pope die for his faith as did the rest of the Apostles, and give up the good life, then I'll believe.

    What is the Pope an example of anyway? What a strange picture! There's Jesus with no home, Peter being whipped, Paul with his head cut off, and a guy wearing a dress made of silk living in opulence. Striking contrast don't you think.

    2 Timothy 3:12 - Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

    I hope the Pope isn't hurtin' too bad!
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    09 May '11 21:08
    Originally posted by josephw
    Philippians 3:8 - Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ,

    Well, when I see a Pope die for his faith as did the rest of the Apostles, and give up the good life, then I'll believe.

    What i ...[text shortened]... godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.

    I hope the Pope isn't hurtin' too bad!
    Well, when I see a Pope die for his faith as did the rest of the Apostles, and give up the good life, then I'll believe.

    Pope John Paul was shot at and for the later part of his years suffered Parkinson's disease. Do you really think his papacy was just a period of extravagant indulgence?
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    09 May '11 21:17
    Originally posted by Conrau K
    [b]Well, when I see a Pope die for his faith as did the rest of the Apostles, and give up the good life, then I'll believe.

    Pope John Paul was shot at and for the later part of his years suffered Parkinson's disease. Do you really think his papacy was just a period of extravagant indulgence?[/b]
    Absolutely extravagant.

    His entire life was one of privilege and prestige.

    But look. I could be all wrong. I'm no body's judge. God may very well have used the man in ways we won't know about till later.

    I've got it pretty good myself anyway. Who am I to complain?
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    09 May '11 21:36
    Originally posted by josephw
    Absolutely extravagant.

    His entire life was one of privilege and prestige.

    But look. I could be all wrong. I'm no body's judge. God may very well have used the man in ways we won't know about till later.

    I've got it pretty good myself anyway. Who am I to complain?
    His entire life was one of privilege and prestige.

    Are you serious? His childhood was marred by the death of his mother and sister. He spent his early adult life training for the priesthood in secret from the Nazi regime. His final years were characterised by excruciating pain. And far from enjoying the pleasures of Rome, he spent a substantial amount of his time outside of Italy visiting Catholics around the world.

    God may very well have used the man in ways we won't know about till later.

    Again, are you serious? This is the guy who oversaw the collapse of communism in Russia. More than any other Christian leaders, he engaged in ecumenical dialogue and saw so much advancement between Orthodox, Anglican and Lutherans. You may disagree with the Pope on a number of influences but I don't think it is possible to deny that he accomplished some very good things.

    Really, I have no idea what you expect of the Pope. Do you want him to pointlessly go to Iraq and deliberately seek martyrdom? What value do you think that would have?
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