1. Standard memberDoctorScribbles
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    27 May '05 03:41
    http://www.skepticsannotatedbible.com/contra/repent.html

    According to the Bible, does God ever repent? Yes or No?

    If he does, doesn't that mean that he occasionally changes his mind?
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    27 May '05 04:09
    Originally posted by DoctorScribbles
    http://www.skepticsannotatedbible.com/contra/repent.html

    According to the Bible, does God ever repent? Yes or No?

    If he does, doesn't that mean that he occasionally changes his mind?
    if the great flood happened as the bible claims, then i think it shows that god has demonstrated repent and regret. i would also conclude (if the flood happened) either that god is not omniscient or that he chooses to not look ahead to the future in at least some cases. if he is not omniscient or chooses to not know the future, then it is entirely possible and maybe even likely that god would find himself in situations he would regret.

    i am not sure this would imply that he changes his mind. how are you defining 'change his mind'? i don't think regret implies changing one's mind, but i would have to think about how to define these things.
  3. Standard membertelerion
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    27 May '05 04:57
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    if the great flood happened as the bible claims, then i think it shows that god has demonstrated repent and regret. i would also conclude (if the flood happened) either that god is not omniscient or that he chooses to not look ahead to the future in at least some cases. if he is not omniscient or chooses to not know the future, then it is entirely possi ...[text shortened]... regret implies changing one's mind, but i would have to think about how to define these things.
    Coletti and I went round and round about this almost a year ago. He insisted that the verses to which you refer do not indicate that God changes his mind.

    You can look over it if you wish. It starts on page 2 and ends on page 4. Since it was a tangential discussion, you'll have to parse through other psts of God and omnipotence.

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=12445
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    27 May '05 10:571 edit
    Originally posted by DoctorScribbles
    http://www.skepticsannotatedbible.com/contra/repent.html

    According to the Bible, does God ever repent? Yes or No?

    If he does, doesn't that mean that he occasionally changes his mind?
    1. You'll need to be clear about which meaning of "repent" is being used in each of the verses:

    re·pent1 ( P ) Pronunciation Key (r-pnt)
    v. re·pent·ed, re·pent·ing, re·pents
    v. intr.
    To feel remorse, contrition, or self-reproach for what one has done or failed to do; be contrite.
    To feel such regret for past conduct as to change one's mind regarding it: repented of intemperate behavior.
    To make a change for the better as a result of remorse or contrition for one's sins.

    v. tr.
    To feel regret or self-reproach for: repent one's sins.
    To cause to feel remorse or regret.

    2. You'll need to take into account which translation of the Bible is being used. I'm guessing the SAB is based on the KJV, in which case I wouldn't be surprised to see words used in archaic senses.

    3. You'll need to take into account what the original Hebrew word used in those verses are.

    The question cannot be answered before these issues are considered.

    EDIT: 4. You'll also need to discover how the readers of those passages interpreted them traditionally.
  5. Standard memberColetti
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    27 May '05 14:39
    Originally posted by telerion
    Coletti and I went round and round about this almost a year ago. He insisted that the verses to which you refer do not indicate that God changes his mind.

    You can look over it if you wish. It starts on page 2 and ends on page 4. Since it was a tangential discussion, you'll have to parse through other psts of God and omnipotence.

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=12445
    That was you!?! I remember. It was a good debate. I'll have to look it up and see if I held up my side as well as you did.
  6. Donationkirksey957
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    27 May '05 15:37
    Originally posted by DoctorScribbles
    http://www.skepticsannotatedbible.com/contra/repent.html

    According to the Bible, does God ever repent? Yes or No?

    If he does, doesn't that mean that he occasionally changes his mind?
    Yes indeed he does repent and change his mind if scripture is to be believed. I consider this to be one of the most hopeful and meaningful aspects of God.
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    27 May '05 15:42
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    Yes indeed he does repent and change his mind if scripture is to be believed. I consider this to be one of the most hopeful and meaningful aspects of God.
    How so? A God who changes His mind could just say, "To hell with it all" at the last minute and boot humanity into nothingness forever.
  8. Standard memberColetti
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    27 May '05 15:44
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    How so? A God who changes His mind could just say, "To hell with it all" at the last minute and boot humanity into nothingness forever.
    It would also mean that we could not count on God to keep his promises.
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    27 May '05 15:50
    Originally posted by Coletti
    It would also mean that we could not count on God to keep his promises.
    Exactly. If I thought God were like that, I'd simply lose hope in Him.

    Not to mention - if God really does change His mind (and not merely a case of us humans anthropomorphising (sp?)), how does He know if his decision-making is getting better or worse?
  10. Donationkirksey957
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    27 May '05 16:09
    Originally posted by Coletti
    It would also mean that we could not count on God to keep his promises.
    This is "all or nothing" thinking. What is so threatening about God having the capacity to change his mind? I would like to know. As to the point that God could just say the hell with it and end humanity, isn't that the game plan? If I am wrong, would you please take it up with RBHill and Blindfaith. Thank you.
  11. Donationkirksey957
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    27 May '05 16:10
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    Exactly. If I thought God were like that, I'd simply lose hope in Him.

    Not to mention - if God really does change His mind (and not merely a case of us humans anthropomorphising (sp?)), how does He know if his decision-making is getting better or worse?
    I am curious to the fact that this idea takes away your hope, but give me hope. Any ideas?
  12. Subscriberno1marauder
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    27 May '05 16:20
    Originally posted by telerion
    Coletti and I went round and round about this almost a year ago. He insisted that the verses to which you refer do not indicate that God changes his mind.

    You can look over it if you wish. It starts on page 2 and ends on page 4. Since it was a tangential discussion, you'll have to parse through other psts of God and omnipotence.

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=12445
    I see debatinng Coletti was just as useless then. "I interpret the Bible to say God is omniscient, an omniscient being cannot change his mind, so God cannot change his mind no matter what the Bible actually says!" Reminds me of my discussions with him regarding Matthew 25.🙄
  13. Standard memberColetti
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    27 May '05 16:22
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    This is "all or nothing" thinking. What is so threatening about God having the capacity to change his mind? I would like to know. As to the point that God could just say the hell with it and end humanity, isn't that the game plan? If I am wrong, would you please take it up with RBHill and Blindfaith. Thank you.
    No it thinking in terms of omni. A God that changes his mind is either not omnipotent, or not omniscient. And one would entail the other. Making God wishy-washy like people makes him more appealing to some, but it is lowering him down to a human scale. That is not the God of the Bible.

    And despite you implied insult to RBHill and Blindfaith, they have a more biblical understanding of God's character and basic biblical truths than you do. So I'll stick with them.
  14. Standard memberColetti
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    27 May '05 16:24
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    I see debatinng Coletti was just as useless then. "I interpret the Bible to say God is omniscient, an omniscient being cannot change his mind, so God cannot change his mind no matter what the Bible actually says!" Reminds me of my discussions with him regarding Matthew 25.🙄
    You do tend to read narrow parts of the Bible as more literal than I do, especially the passages that suit your arguments. 😉
  15. Subscriberno1marauder
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    27 May '05 16:36
    Originally posted by Coletti
    You do tend to read narrow parts of the Bible as more literal than I do, especially the passages that suit your arguments. 😉
    I guess you have your own interpretation of "narrow" as well; I wouldn't call the parts where God decides to destroy all humanity save one family "narrow" nor would I describe where Jesus (God in the flesh) describes Judgment Day "narrow". They seem pretty "broad" to me!
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