1. Standard memberKellyJay
    Walk your Faith
    USA
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    03 Apr '16 21:04
    What do you suppose God was trying to tell us with this passage?

    Matthew 11:17-19English Standard Version (ESV)

    17 “‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance;
    we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.’

    18 For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’ 19 The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look at him! A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds.”
  2. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
    Joined
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    8660
    03 Apr '16 21:12
    One excuse or another for not hearing God's word.
  3. Standard memberRemoved
    Joined
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    100919
    03 Apr '16 21:24
    Originally posted by KellyJay
    What do you suppose God was trying to tell us with this passage?

    Matthew 11:17-19English Standard Version (ESV)

    17 “‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance;
    we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.’

    18 For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’ 19 The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ...[text shortened]... and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds.”
    Lk 7:33 “neither eating bread nor drinking wine.” Luke 7:33, 34, contrasts the ministries of John the Baptist and Jesus Christ. When the text says that John did not come “eating bread,” it does not mean that he always fasted—that would be impossible. “Bread” is being used as a synecdoche for food in general, and of course John had to eat. But he did not go to feasts and parties, he lived a simple and ascetic lifestyle. What we see of John’s ministry in Scripture is that it prepared people for the Day of Judgment. He baptized people with a “baptism of repentance,” that is, a baptism that outwardly demonstrated their inward repentance. He fasted often, and in the records we have of him speaking, he often spoke of the subject of judgment and the wrath to come (cp. Matt. 3:7-12). In contrast, Jesus came “eating and drinking,” keeping company with sinners, and a large part of his teaching focused on the kingdom of heaven, and his actions portrayed the joy of that kingdom in many ways.

    Neither John’s behavior nor Jesus’ behavior pleased the critical and over-religious Jews, which is a wonderful object lesson for us. Far too many people spend their lives trying to please other people who just cannot be pleased. We need to live our lives in a way that pleases God, and if other people are not happy about that there is nothing we can or should do about it. Jesus set the example for us in dealing with these Jews: he ignored their criticism.

    http://www.revisedenglishversion.com/commentary/Luke/7
  4. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
    Brisbane,QLD
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    03 Apr '16 21:24
    A version of the Christian god?
  5. Standard memberwolfgang59
    Infidel
    Dunedin
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    05 Apr '16 07:59
    Originally posted by KellyJay
    What do you suppose God was trying to tell us with this passage?

    trying?
    he obviously didn't try hard enough did he if you have to discuss it!

    not very omnipotent is it?
    an inability to communicate with inferiors!

    wouldn't even get a job as a supervisor let alone CEO.
  6. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
    Joined
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    8660
    05 Apr '16 12:052 edits
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    trying?
    he obviously didn't try hard enough did he if you have to discuss it!

    not very omnipotent is it?
    an inability to communicate with inferiors!

    wouldn't even get a job as a supervisor let alone CEO.



    Thankyou for a live demonstration of what the parable was teaching.
    Man in rebellion to God rationalizes one excuse or another for not hearing God's word.
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