Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Sports Forum

Sports Forum

  1. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    10 Apr '13 04:41
    http://www.cbc.ca/sports/golf/story/2013/04/08/sp-pga-tour-masters-guan-tianlang.html?cmp=rss
  2. 10 Apr '13 07:16
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    http://www.cbc.ca/sports/golf/story/2013/04/08/sp-pga-tour-masters-guan-tianlang.html?cmp=rss
    It's good to see that he has earned his right to play at Augusta.

    But I still wonder about the wisdom of putting someone so young squarely into the media spotlight on a course like Augusta. He has a whole career to think about, not just providing a bit of a sideshow to the main event.

    A couple of mid 70 rounds would do nicely.
  3. Subscriber Crowley
    Not Aleister
    10 Apr '13 08:45
    That's fricken amazing.
    At 14 I was an almost decent junior, but I hit 100 as many times as I hit 80-odd.

    I hope has lots of fun. I think for a kid of that age there is no fear, so I think he will.
  4. Subscriber shortcircuit
    The Energizer
    10 Apr '13 11:51
    It is nice to see several of the players working with the kid. I am wondering if the
    pressure won't be more on the field if the kid plays well. I am sure they don't want
    to finish lower in the standings than "the kid".

    I would think length would be his biggest problem, which he addressed. It will we a
    fun story to watch unfold.
  5. 11 Apr '13 06:18
    An opening 77 followed by an 82.

    Harrington wins the Masters beating Garcia in a playoff... oh wait, that was the open a few years back, never mind.
  6. Subscriber shortcircuit
    The Energizer
    12 Apr '13 00:58
    The kid shoots a 73 in the first round.
    If he can hold it together tomorrow, he might make the cut.
  7. 13 Apr '13 00:22 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by shortcircuit
    The kid shoots a 73 in the first round.
    If he can hold it together tomorrow, he might make the cut.
    After shooting rounds of 73 and 75 (148, 4 over par), Guan Tianlang (age 14)
    has made the cut at his first (and probably not his last) Masters tournament.

    Playing on a very windy day, on hole 17 Guan Tianlang was assessed a one stroke
    penalty for excessively slow play, a penalty that rarely was been invoked before.
    This penalty seems to have provoked much controversy, with some people
    accusing the tournament official of bias against Guan's nationality or race.
    (I am unconvinced of that bias.) But would such a penalty have been invoked
    against Tiger Woods or an established American star in the same circumstances?

    While Guan Tianlang may have technically violated the rule against slow play,
    none of the players with him had made any complaint. Why was it considered
    so important for the tournament to make an example of a 14 year old Chinese lad
    (an amateur whose success would not deprive anyone else of prize money) who
    was participating in his first Masters? It's not as though he was gaining an unfair
    competitive advantage. (I would not always insist upon a strict adherence to 'touch
    move' rules if my opponent was playing in one's first rated chess tournament.)
    In any event, on account of his play and sportsmanship Guan Tianlang already
    seems to have gained admirers from many golf fans around the world.
  8. Subscriber shortcircuit
    The Energizer
    13 Apr '13 03:32
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    After shooting rounds of 73 and 75 (148, 4 over par), Guan Tianlang (age 14)
    has made the cut at his first (and probably not his last) Masters tournament.

    Playing on a very windy day, on hole 17 Guan Tianlang was assessed a one stroke
    penalty for excessively slow play, a penalty that rarely was been invoked before.
    This penalty seems to have provo ...[text shortened]... Guan Tianlang already
    seems to have gained admirers from many golf fans around the world.
    While I agree that the penalty was harsh, what else could the officials do?
    They were in a no win situation. The kid had been warned on 3 different occasions
    PRIOR to the 17th hole that he was playing too slow and he needed to pick up the pace.
    They even sought out the kid's father to make sure the kid understood what they were
    telling him about the slow play.

    Now, when he breaks the time limit again, if they don't penalize him, then they might
    be accused of favoritism. I mean, if the officials shouldn't do what they were there to
    do, then why have officials at all.

    Ben Crenshaw probably said it best when he said he felt terrible for the kid and this
    action by the officials was not going to turn out well. He didn't say the kid wasn't
    guilty, but he also said it was not going to turn out well in the media.

    The guy who really got screwed today was Tiger Woods on the 15th when his shot
    nearly went into the hole for an eagle, but instead caroms off the flag stick back into the water. That was a bad break.
  9. Subscriber Crowley
    Not Aleister
    13 Apr '13 06:26
    Originally posted by shortcircuit
    The guy who really got screwed today was Tiger Woods on the 15th when his shot
    nearly went into the hole for an eagle, but instead caroms off the flag stick back into the water. That was a bad break.
    Screwed? If he hit it perfect, it would have gone in. That's not my definition of 'screwed'.
  10. Subscriber Crowley
    Not Aleister
    13 Apr '13 06:33
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    After shooting rounds of 73 and 75 (148, 4 over par), Guan Tianlang (age 14)
    has made the cut at his first (and probably not his last) Masters tournament.

    Playing on a very windy day, on hole 17 Guan Tianlang was assessed a one stroke
    penalty for excessively slow play, a penalty that rarely was been invoked before.
    This penalty seems to have provo ...[text shortened]... Guan Tianlang already
    seems to have gained admirers from many golf fans around the world.
    I don't know if you have played golf before, but standing around, waiting to tee off because a 14 year old in front of you is taking his sweet time frustrates the group behind.
  11. 13 Apr '13 07:14 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Crowley
    Screwed? If he hit it perfect, it would have gone in. That's not my definition of 'screwed'.
    They have tried rolling putts down tubes that deliver the ball at exactly the same line and pace each time. You'd be amazed at the distance where it doesn't go in every single time. Well under 20ft for even a flat straight putt.

    It was a great shot, it just happened to hit the flagstick. Just as he got lucky when his chip at the 16th all those years ago happened to roll in. But it is the players that can execute these shots to this level of accuracy to give them a chance that will pull off wonderful shots from time to time, but also get the odd bad break like yesterday. But definitely not 'screwed'.

    Had it been Garcia, he would have been bemoaning his luck for the next two rounds, as he slipped down the leaderboard to 'prove the point'. Tiger looks much more focused, and I certainly would not be betting against him from here. He looks as good as I have seen him for almost a decade.
  12. 13 Apr '13 07:42 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    After shooting rounds of 73 and 75 (148, 4 over par), Guan Tianlang (age 14)
    has made the cut at his first (and probably not his last) Masters tournament.

    Playing on a very windy day, on hole 17 Guan Tianlang was assessed a one stroke
    penalty for excessively slow play, a penalty that rarely was been invoked before.
    This penalty seems to have provo Guan Tianlang already
    seems to have gained admirers from many golf fans around the world.
    Well, that's a crock.

    The reason the penalty has rarely been assessed is that players with more experience than this lad has adjust their speed of play so that they do not incur the penalty. Warnings have been handed out plenty of times in the past, and the officials were just doing their job. It is a matter of fact or not whether he was taking 40 seconds or more once the warning is in place. He took more than 5 minutes to select a club on one of his warnings. That is simply ridiculous and other players may well have played better if they had been allowed this amount of time. It was hardly marginal and is potentially gaining an unfair advantage.

    Snedeker's comments that they shouldn't have done it to a 14 year old, simply makes a mockery of rules enforcement. If he is there on merit, he should get treated the same as any other player.

    Suggestions of racism, given the international profile of golf today, should be treated with contempt until evidence is offered.

    But all credit to the lad, who is making less fuss over this than the media, and congratulations to him on making the cut. Exceptional performance.
  13. 13 Apr '13 10:59
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/golf/mastersaugusta/9991809/The-Masters-2013-Tiger-Woods-facing-potential-disqualification-over-incorrect-drop-on-15th-hole.html

    Of course, if Tiger Woods is not disqualified, we can look to the unedifying prospect of people crying foul, and saying it is only because it was Tiger Woods that he was not.

    The reality is that the officials will spend a lot of time looking at precedent and whether similar situations in the past were deemed to be within the margin of what is acceptable. If they were, Tiger will play on. If they were not, then he will be disqualified. I remember Faldo being in a similar situation over a scorecard incident when he was the World No 1, and the biggest draw in the game. He was disqualified.
  14. 13 Apr '13 11:25 / 2 edits
    Having looked at the rules, this will all boil down to what 'as near as possible' means.

    I think Tiger may have been confusing the fact that, once the ball is dropped, it can move up to two club lengths away from point it strikes the course, but not nearer the pin. However, this does not apply to the original drop. You can't drop it up to two club lengths away from the original shot. You must drop it 'as near as possible'.

    Or possibly the rule which applies to an unplayable ball, which allows you to drop within two club lengths. However, he cannot claim he was taking an unplayable drop, as this rule does not apply to balls in a way hazard. Which does rather beg the question as to why you can move it two clubs lengths for an unplayable, and then drop, but not for a ball in a water hazard.

    However, if I were playing a Sunday competition, and had just plopped in the water, I would probably drop the ball a couple of feet away from the divot and not think anything of it. I don't think you would reasonably be required to try and hit the divot with your drop. It would be different if this was a placing situation.

    I think it will come down to how close he actually was to the original divot. If we a talking a foot or two, he should be OK. If it is a couple of yards, then he may be in trouble.

    I wouldn't want to be the rules official on this one. He could be about to 'ruin' what was building up to be one of the best Masters in ages, and whatever decision he gives he will get it in the neck from some people.
  15. Subscriber shortcircuit
    The Energizer
    13 Apr '13 14:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Crowley
    Screwed? If he hit it perfect, it would have gone in. That's not my definition of 'screwed'.
    Yes screwed. That shot was on the nuts and it ricochet's off the pin.
    Terrible break. Then it gets compounded with an additional 2 stroke penalty
    for an illegal drop.