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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Donation buckky
    Filthy sinner
    25 Jan '11 23:26
    Blacks have always produced the best music for my sensibilities. Then came Rap and the whole thing went belly up. Bring back Motown and drop this Rap crap.
  2. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 Jan '11 23:32
    Originally posted by buckky
    Blacks have always produced the best music for my sensibilities. Then came Rap and the whole thing went belly up. Bring back Motown and drop this Rap crap.
    Bring back acoustic country blues and then we can talk. Do the names Mississippi John Hurt, Reverend Gary Davis, Brownie Mcgee, Sonny Terry, Blind Blake, Robert Johnson
    ring a bell?
  3. 26 Jan '11 03:57
    Originally posted by buckky
    Blacks have always produced the best music for my sensibilities. Then came Rap and the whole thing went belly up. Bring back Motown and drop this Rap crap.
    And how! I miss the great music both of the sixties, the thirties, forties, the incredible inventiveness of the Ellingtons, jazz greats like Armstong, many others too numerous to name, Hendrix, Coltrane and on and on!
  4. 26 Jan '11 06:52 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    And how! I miss the great music both of the sixties, the thirties, forties, the incredible inventiveness of the Ellingtons, jazz greats like Armstong, many others too numerous to name, Hendrix, Coltrane and on and on!
    one must not forget Scott Joplin!
  5. Donation buckky
    Filthy sinner
    26 Jan '11 12:23
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Bring back acoustic country blues and then we can talk. Do the names Mississippi John Hurt, Reverend Gary Davis, Brownie Mcgee, Sonny Terry, Blind Blake, Robert Johnson
    ring a bell?
    That is the real stuff !!
  6. 26 Jan '11 12:35
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    one must not forget Scott Joplin!
    Indeed Scott Joplin was revolutionary! Joplin leads to Duke Ellington, who leads to Cab Callaway and the BIg Band era. Wonderful stuff indeed!
  7. 06 Feb '11 21:36
    as a self described "Hip Hop Head", i have to ask - whats with the rap-bashing? what is so repulsive about the medium?
  8. 06 Feb '11 22:01
    Originally posted by JDev84
    as a self described "Hip Hop Head", i have to ask - whats with the rap-bashing? what is so repulsive about the medium?
    The incessant beat for one. Mindless and intellectually numbing. It makes dead black greats roll in their graves! I can't imagine Duke Ellington embracing this garbage!
  9. 07 Feb '11 00:03
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Bring back acoustic country blues and then we can talk. Do the names Mississippi John Hurt, Reverend Gary Davis, Brownie Mcgee, Sonny Terry, Blind Blake, Robert Johnson
    ring a bell?
    I know a fellow who performs here in Scottsdale, Az, name is Hans Olson. He told me that he tool Sonny Terry's place in the band up in Minnesota.

    I agree that acoustic country blues is the centerpiece of much of what we hear today.
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Just another day
    07 Feb '11 00:10
    Originally posted by JDev84
    as a self described "Hip Hop Head", i have to ask - whats with the rap-bashing? what is so repulsive about the medium?
    I think it's 2 things for most people.

    1) The lyrics are spoken rhythmically to a beat, not sung, and instruments are often artificial, which kind of takes away a lot of the human musical artistry, and

    2) The genre is still in that phase where jazz once was, associated with inner city impoverished criminals of color and all the social baggage that comes with that, including associations with drugs, violence, and other antisocial behavior. It's a child of the 70's and still has some growing pangs, including needing time for hippies to psychoanalyze and reinterpret it and for the once-poor rappers to get used to their wealth.
  11. 07 Feb '11 03:58
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I think it's 2 things for most people.

    1) The lyrics are spoken rhythmically to a beat, not sung, and instruments are often artificial, which kind of takes away a lot of the human musical artistry, and

    2) The genre is still in that phase where jazz once was, associated with inner city impoverished criminals of color and all the social baggage t ...[text shortened]... o psychoanalyze and reinterpret it and for the once-poor rappers to get used to their wealth.
    Are you kidding me? Jazz was never inner city at all and was never associated with drugs. Jazz as we know it might even be credited to Debussy. He's real inner city, isn't he? How could you compare a protomusic like rap with jazz? How much jazz was gangsta? One is of unparalleled artistry, the other mindless beat, nasty lyrics, saggy pants, horrible performers and presents absolutely no value whatsoever!
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Just another day
    07 Feb '11 06:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Are you kidding me? Jazz was never inner city at all and was never associated with drugs. Jazz as we know it might even be credited to Debussy. He's real inner city, isn't he? How could you compare a protomusic like rap with jazz? How much jazz was gangsta? One is of unparalleled artistry, the other mindless beat, nasty lyrics, saggy pants, horrible performers and presents absolutely no value whatsoever!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_J._Anslinger

    There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."
  13. 07 Feb '11 11:28
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Are you kidding me? Jazz was never inner city at all and was never associated with drugs. Jazz as we know it might even be credited to Debussy. He's real inner city, isn't he? How could you compare a protomusic like rap with jazz? How much jazz was gangsta? One is of unparalleled artistry, the other mindless beat, nasty lyrics, saggy pants, horrible performers and presents absolutely no value whatsoever!
    Never associated with drugs? Err... You're right jazz drew from modern classical music (at the time) like the impressionists, Stravinsky, etc. but that hardly makes it less "inner city" music.

    Rap, at least the relatively good rap (Public Enemy etc.), represents a medium in which social issues are addressed much akin to the blaxploitation era of Hayes and Mayfield and others. Also, while most "commercial", "saggy-pants" rap is not exactly known for it creativity and innovation, the innovation of 80s hip hop pioneers, and later artists like DJ Shadow, helped build on the foundations laid by the dub reggae scene when it comes to remixing and sampling. Indeed, several modern jazz musicians now use these techniques (Koop is a notable example, which is enterily sample-based "jazz", Medeski, Martin and Wood are also notable for their hip hop influences), not to mention the trip-hop genre which in turn influenced much downtempo music of the 90s and 2000s.
  14. Subscriber Proper Knob
    Cornovii
    07 Feb '11 11:32
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Are you kidding me? Jazz was never inner city at all and was never associated with drugs. Jazz as we know it might even be credited to Debussy. He's real inner city, isn't he? How could you compare a protomusic like rap with jazz? How much jazz was gangsta? One is of unparalleled artistry, the other mindless beat, nasty lyrics, saggy pants, horrible performers and presents absolutely no value whatsoever!
    I suggest you read Charlie Parker and Miles Davis autobiographies.
  15. Subscriber FMF
    Main Poster
    07 Feb '11 16:24
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Jazz was never inner city at all and was never associated with drugs.
    Are you kidding?