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Culture Forum

  1. 06 Apr '11 00:22
    In musicianship, particularly guitars, singing, songwriting and so on country now totally surpasses rock.

    I've been a life long rock fan but I can no longer deny the obvious.
  2. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    06 Apr '11 00:25
    Originally posted by badmoon
    In musicianship, particularly guitars, singing, songwriting and so on country now totally surpasses rock.

    I've been a life long rock fan but I can no longer deny the obvious.
    "We play both kinds of music. Country AND Western!"
  3. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    06 Apr '11 01:25
    Originally posted by badmoon
    In musicianship, particularly guitars, singing, songwriting and so on country now totally surpasses rock.

    I've been a life long rock fan but I can no longer deny the obvious.
    Define 'country'.
  4. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    06 Apr '11 03:20
    Originally posted by badmoon
    In musicianship, particularly guitars, singing, songwriting and so on country now totally surpasses rock.

    I've been a life long rock fan but I can no longer deny the obvious.
    Define "surpasses" in a way that I will agree with.
  5. 06 Apr '11 03:22
    Originally posted by badmoon
    In musicianship, particularly guitars, singing, songwriting and so on country now totally surpasses rock.

    I've been a life long rock fan but I can no longer deny the obvious.
    your getting old!
  6. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    06 Apr '11 07:07 / 1 edit
    Rock is for posers, hipsters and queers.

    Real men listen mariachi music.
  7. 06 Apr '11 11:33
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Define 'country'.
    Now that is a tough one.

    Most say its roots are from the Southern US in the form of folk or hillbilly music, although I think that a case can be made that it was comes from the Celtic sounds that were brought over.

    Mostly a 4/4 beat using keying off the 1 and 3 note. It often sings about community and family and relationships. I'm winging this one so cut me some slack. Now it has broadened to include early rock and roll. It certainly has blues roots with a touch of swing. Country music now sounds more like early rock and roll than the current bunch of rockers.

    It has to pass the smell test like any other kind of music - you know it when you hear it.

    I'll add that this is nore of a comment to the lack of talent in modern day rock than an endorsement of the country (and western, ok) genre.
  8. 06 Apr '11 11:59
    Originally posted by badmoon
    In musicianship, particularly guitars, singing, songwriting and so on country now totally surpasses rock.

    I've been a life long rock fan but I can no longer deny the obvious.
    Amen brother! I've always been quite impressed with the musicianship of both C&W and Bluegrass.
  9. 06 Apr '11 15:34
    Both "country" and "rock" are far too broad to make such sweeping statements.
  10. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    06 Apr '11 15:48
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Both "country" and "rock" are far too broad to make such sweeping statements.
    I'd say you are generalizing here.
  11. 07 Apr '11 09:24
    Originally posted by badmoon
    Now that is a tough one.

    Most say its roots are from the Southern US in the form of folk or hillbilly music, although I think that a case can be made that it was comes from the Celtic sounds that were brought over.

    Mostly a 4/4 beat using keying off the 1 and 3 note. It often sings about community and family and relationships. I'm winging this one so ...[text shortened]... lack of talent in modern day rock than an endorsement of the country (and western, ok) genre.
    its just a genre, line dancing is against everything i stand for, conformity, lack of
    individuality, automated and expressionless.
  12. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    07 Apr '11 10:10
    Originally posted by badmoon
    Now that is a tough one.

    Most say its roots are from the Southern US in the form of folk or hillbilly music, although I think that a case can be made that it was comes from the Celtic sounds that were brought over.

    Mostly a 4/4 beat using keying off the 1 and 3 note. It often sings about community and family and relationships. I'm winging this one so ...[text shortened]... lack of talent in modern day rock than an endorsement of the country (and western, ok) genre.
    That's just the thing. If you lump everything that isn't heavy metal under the banner 'country', then, well, who wouldn't like country? For my part, I like bluegrass. I like folk. I like roots music. I like Johnny Cash and Flatt & Scruggs. But I hate the 'country' of Toby Keith or Billy Ray Cyrus.
  13. 07 Apr '11 11:25 / 1 edit
    Indeed Toby Keith and Billy Ray Cyrus hardly qualify as exemplars of anyting but inane music, not much better than utube sensation Rebecca Black. Side by side with Travelling McCourys they sound even worse. Yet even popsy blue grass like Union Station does is still quite appealing because of the extraordinary musicianship of said band.
  14. 07 Apr '11 19:45
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Indeed Toby Keith and Billy Ray Cyrus hardly qualify as exemplars of anyting but inane music, not much better than utube sensation Rebecca Black. Side by side with Travelling McCourys they sound even worse. Yet even popsy blue grass like Union Station does is still quite appealing because of the extraordinary musicianship of said band.
    I love JJ Cale , sometimes hes got a country feel, but its not country for country's sake.
  15. 07 Apr '11 21:24
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I love JJ Cale , sometimes hes got a country feel, but its not country for country's sake.
    Plenty of artists out there who are very good and provide us great enjoyment instead of great annoyment!