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  1. 31 Oct '17 18:00 / 1 edit
    Florence Mills died on 1 November 1927, almost exactly 90 years ago.
    There may be no one alive who can remember her perform as an actress, dancer, or singer.
    Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her are known to survive.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Mills

    "Florence Mills (born Florence Winfrey; January 25, 1896 – November 1, 1927),[1]
    billed as the "Queen of Happiness", was an African-American cabaret singer,
    dancer, and comedian known for her effervescent stage presence,
    delicate voice, and winsome, wide-eyed beauty."

    ""Let me sing of Florence Mills, whose voice beguiles as it were an enraptured bird,
    whatsoever its plumage or lineage; beguiles, and saddens too, for the tones
    of it are all with pathos delicately edged. Her coloratura is as wide in range,
    as clean and sure in flight and descent as that of any ascetic prima donna."
    --Basil Maine

    "When she sings her song I'm a Little Blackbird she lets herself out, and
    - My God! Man, I've never seen anything like it! Not only that, I never imagined
    such a tempestuous blend of passion and humour could be poured into
    the singing of a song. I never expect to see anything like it again, unless
    I become gifted with second sight and behold a Valkyr riding ahead of a thunderstorm.
    Or see Florence Mills singing another song."
    --Theophilus Lewis

    "Florence Mills, who died very young, is, after all these years, a great
    person in the memory of all who ever saw her. . . .When she sang, the
    whole of her person was engaged, so that even if I cannot remember her voice,
    I am still under the spell of her singing."
    --Gilbert Seldes

    Florence Mills's singing voice has become a legend and, as such,
    will remain beyond comparison or criticism.
  2. Standard member Ghost of a Duke
    Zen Master
    31 Oct '17 21:28
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    Florence Mills died on 1 November 1927, almost exactly 90 years ago.
    There may be no one alive who can remember her perform as an actress, dancer, or singer.
    Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her are known to survive.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Mills

    "Florence Mills (born Florence Winfrey; January 25, 1896 – November 1, 19 ...[text shortened]... s's singing voice has become a legend and, as such,
    will remain beyond comparison or criticism.
    Is this not her singing and dancing?

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgrpViU5L_k
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    31 Oct '17 23:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    Florence Mills died on 1 November 1927, almost exactly 90 years ago.
    There may be no one alive who can remember her perform as an actress, dancer, or singer.
    Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her are known to survive.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Mills

    "Florence Mills (born Florence Winfrey; January 25, 1896 – November 1, 19 ...[text shortened]... s's singing voice has become a legend and, as such,
    will remain beyond comparison or criticism.
    Here she is dancing:

    YouTube

    So introverted
  4. 31 Oct '17 23:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @ghost-of-a-duke
    Is this not her singing and dancing?

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgrpViU5L_k
    On YouTube, it's easy to claim that something is what it's not.
    Ghost of a Duke shows his extreme gullibility.

    "Why is there footage of Nina Mae McKinney performing in this?"
    --viewer's comment

    "There is no actual footage recorded of her [Florence Mills] dancing or singing during a show."
    --viewer's comment

    According to authors of books about Florence Mills (who presumably searched much
    harder than Ghost of a Duke), no audios or videos of her performing are known to survive.
    A website dedicated to Florence Mills agrees with that.
  5. 31 Oct '17 23:22 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    Here she is dancing:

    [youtube]5J6oOQI7oZM[/youtube]

    So introverted
    Sonhouse cites a video of "Florence Hill and Bessie Dudley".
    The extremely gullible Sonhouse's unable to distinguish between Florence Hill and Florence Mills.
  6. Standard member Ghost of a Duke
    Zen Master
    01 Nov '17 08:33
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    On YouTube, it's easy to claim that something is what it's not.
    Ghost of a Duke shows his extreme gullibility.

    "Why is there footage of Nina Mae McKinney performing in this?"
    --viewer's comment

    "There is no actual footage recorded of her [Florence Mills] dancing or singing during a show."
    --viewer's comment

    According to authors of books ab ...[text shortened]... of her performing are known to survive.
    A website dedicated to Florence Mills agrees with that.
    Why you turn everything in to a personal battle is beyond me.

    My post was intended to be helpful and fuelled by nothing other than curiosity.
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Nov '17 16:39 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    Sonhouse cites a video of "Florence Hill and Bessie Dudley".
    The extremely gullible Sonhouse's unable to distinguish between Florence Hill and Florence Mills.
    No, not gullible, just didn't read it close enough. You really love the perjorative.

    She died very young, if she had lived another ten years she would for sure have been video taped, or at least audio tape or some such.
  8. 01 Nov '17 18:10 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by @ghost-of-a-duke
    Why you turn everything in to a personal battle is beyond me.
    My post was intended to be helpful and fuelled by nothing other than curiosity.
    "Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her [Florence Mills] are known to survive."
    --Duchess64

    Given that Ghost of a Duke loves to believe the usual nonsense of trolls like himself that
    about everything that I write obviously must be totally wrong, Ghost of a Duke apparently
    hastened to do an internet search and eagerly jumped to the conclusion that he had evidence
    showing (if not proving) that I am wrong. Ghost of a Duke also shows that he cannot
    distinguish Florence Mills (of whom photos exist) from another black woman performer.
    They all look exactly alike, don't they? (sarcasm intended)

    If Ghost of a Duke had even bothered to read some of the viewer's comments of his cited video,
    then he could have noticed some people pointing out that it's *not* of the real Florence Mills.
    As I expected, Ghost of a Duke cannot bring himself to admit cleanly his ignorant errors.
  9. 01 Nov '17 18:22 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    No, not gullible, just didn't read it close enough. You really love the perjorative.

    She died very young, if she had lived another ten years she would for sure have been video taped, or at least audio tape or some such.
    The insecure Sonhouse keeps showing his unwillingness to admit cleanly even his obvious factual errors.

    "Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her [Florence Mills] are known to survive."
    --Duchess64

    So Sonhouse did an instant internet search and arrogantly jumped to the conclusion that I must be wrong.
    Sonhouse never even considered the possibility that I would have much more to support my statement.

    In reality, Sonhouse's one of the most gullible persons (for his level of technical education)
    whom I ever have encountered. It's a sign of his low general intelligence that Sonhouse
    appears to be obstinately clueless about his own severe limitations of comprehension.
    No wonder Sonhouse often likes to keep playing along with other deluded trolls.

    "She died very young, if she had lived another ten years she would for sure have been
    video taped, or at least audio tape or some such."
    --Sonhouse

    What a meaningless rationalization! If things were different, then they would not be the same.
    If Lincoln had lived 'another ten years' or if Hitler had lived 'another ten years' ...

    In reality, many audio or video recordings were made before Florence Mills's death.
    As a black American woman, however, she would not have been considered important
    enough yet for her own recording contract in the USA. Nonetheless, the Prince of Wales
    (reportedly) became infatuated with her, watching her London show many times.
  10. 01 Nov '17 18:31
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    On YouTube, it's easy to claim that something is what it's not.
    Ghost of a Duke shows his extreme gullibility.

    "Why is there footage of Nina Mae McKinney performing in this?"
    --viewer's comment

    "There is no actual footage recorded of her [Florence Mills] dancing or singing during a show."
    --viewer's comment

    According to authors of books ab ...[text shortened]... of her performing are known to survive.
    A website dedicated to Florence Mills agrees with that.
    Thanks to my usual lying trolls for the expected 'thumbs down' for my factually accurate post.
    I await more of your claimed evidence of any video recordings of the real Florence Mills.
  11. Standard member Ghost of a Duke
    Zen Master
    01 Nov '17 20:00
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    "Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her [Florence Mills] are known to survive."
    --Duchess64

    Given that Ghost of a Duke loves to believe the usual nonsense of trolls like himself that
    about everything that I write obviously must be totally wrong, Ghost of a Duke apparently
    hastened to do an internet search and eagerly jumped to the concl ...[text shortened]... ills.
    As I expected, Ghost of a Duke cannot bring himself to admit cleanly his ignorant errors.
    Such a silly reply. Your OP stated 'Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her are known to survive.'

    Out of curiosity I did a cursory search and came across a chap who was clearly a fan of Florence Mills, and while he spoke about her footage played of a woman dancing and singing the songs she was apparently famous for. - It was not unreasonable for me to assume the woman portrayed was the women he was speaking about. - My interest did not extend to doing a detailed investigation. I merely shared the link in the belief it might be something you'd be interested in. This is after all the Culture forum, not the Debates forum.

    I was forgetting you lack the ability to change gear. - Any other reasonable human being would have simply replied. 'No, that isn't her.'
  12. 01 Nov '17 20:14
    Originally posted by @ghost-of-a-duke
    Such a silly reply. Your OP stated 'Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her are known to survive.'

    Out of curiosity I did a cursory search and came across a chap who was clearly a fan of Florence Mills, and while he spoke about her footage played of a woman dancing and singing the songs she was apparently famous for. - It was not unre ...[text shortened]... change gear. - Any other reasonable human being would have simply replied. 'No, that isn't her.'
    First of all, Ghost of a Duke arrogantly presumed that he could disprove my original statement
    by doing a 'cursory search', as though I had no reason to make that statement in the first place.

    On YouTube, it's easy to claim that something is what it's not.
    Ghost of a Duke shows his extreme gullibility.

    "It was not unreasonable for me to assume the woman portrayed was the women he was speaking about."
    --Ghost of a Duke

    Did Ghost of a Duke believe that she looked exactly like the real Florence Mills?

    I note that Ghost of a Duke was too lazy to read even the first viewers' comments.
    "Why is there footage of Nina Mae McKinney performing in this?"
    --viewer's comment

    "There is no actual footage recorded of her [Florence Mills] dancing or singing during a show."
    --viewer's comment

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nina_Mae_McKinney

    Does Ghost of a Duke believe that Nina Mae McKinney looks exactly like Florence Mills?
    They were both black American women, but they don't look like Doppelgängers to me.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Nov '17 20:26 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The insecure Sonhouse keeps showing his unwillingness to admit cleanly even his obvious factual errors.

    "Unfortunately, no audio or video recordings of her [Florence Mills] are known to survive."
    --Duchess64

    So Sonhouse did an instant internet search and arrogantly jumped to the conclusion that I must be wrong.
    Sonhouse never even considered the ...[text shortened]... e Prince of Wales
    (reportedly) became infatuated with her, watching her London show many times.
    What part of 'I didn't read it closely enough' do you not see as an admission of error? So I was wrong about that. I assume my mistake was not actually licking your boots and humbling myself before you in abject misery. My guess is somewhere someone has film of her even if none is found as of yet.

    My guitar teacher, Backwards Sam Firk, AKA Michael A Stewart was a collector of black country blues 78's from the 1910's to the 50's and found some recording of which there were only one or two copies and people had written no known copies exist of X player.

    I suspect something will turn up sometime. She was clearly a national treasure even if not recognized by white folks.

    One woman of note in the 1950's was Nina Simone, a black woman who was refused admission to the Curtis institute of music, she says because she is black. Of course in my errant gulliblilty I presume she is right about that. One song of hers, Mississippi Goddam clearly states her POV.

    YouTube

    Her piano technique was amazing, throwing in improv that would have delighted Mozart.

    Not on this song so much.

    Another singer, American indian, Buffy Saine-Marie, sang this:

    My country 'tis of thy people you're dying

    YouTube

    She tells it like it is. My wife's grandmother was raised on a res.

    This song effected me deeply but what can I say, I am just a lying hypocritical craven gullible idiot. BTW, none of those thumbs down came from me.
  14. Standard member Ghost of a Duke
    Zen Master
    01 Nov '17 20:55
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    First of all, Ghost of a Duke arrogantly presumed that he could disprove my original statement
    by doing a 'cursory search', as though I had no reason to make that statement in the first place.

    On YouTube, it's easy to claim that something is what it's not.
    Ghost of a Duke shows his extreme gullibility.

    "It was not unreasonable for me to assume t ...[text shortened]... rence Mills?
    They were both black American women, but they don't look like Doppelgängers to me.
    So very very silly.

    I'm rather embarrassed to be seen speaking to you.
  15. 01 Nov '17 21:04 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    What part of 'I didn't read it closely enough' do you not see as an admission of error? So I was wrong about that. I assume my mistake was not actually licking your boots and humbling myself before you in abject misery. My guess is somewhere someone has film of her even if none is found as of yet.

    My guitar teacher, Backwards Sam Firk, AKA Michael A St ...[text shortened]... am just a lying hypocritical craven gullible idiot. BTW, none of those thumbs down came from me.
    "The insecure Sonhouse keeps showing his unwillingness to *admit cleanly* even his obvious factual errors."
    --Duchess64

    "No, not gullible, just didn't read it close enough. You really love the perjorative."
    --Sonhouse

    Sonhouse denied that he's gullible. I would say that it shows extreme gullibility for Sonhouse
    to believe that he could refute my statement just by doing an instant search on the internet.
    The self-pitying Sonhouse refused to give me any credit for knowing what I was writing about.

    "So I was wrong about that."
    --Sonhouse

    Is that all that Sonhouse has to say about apparently assuming that two black women look exactly alike?
    Is Sonhouse unaware that 'They all look alike' is a racist stereotype?

    "My guess is somewhere someone has film of her even if none is found as of yet."
    --Sonhouse

    Who do you surmise has this film? Why do you surmise that it has not been made known?

    Any authenticated video or even audio of Florence Mills performing would be not only of
    historical interest but also could be worth significant money. There's no reason to conceal it.