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General Forum

  1. Joined
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    22 Dec '15 23:19
    Must be a copy paste thread. So here we go:

    continue this "stream" of senseless copy paste crap like posts. I will start:

    The 'pile of poo' emoji is a special symbol that can be used on smartphones, tablets, and computers. Your device needs to support this particular emoji in order for you to be able to use it, otherwise the emoji may not appear.

    On many devices, you can use the shortcode :hankey: to add the pile of poo emoji to your messages.

    Different devices may have different versions of the pile of poo emoji. The chart on this page shows how this emoji is displayed on Android, iOS, and other platforms.

    source: https://www.emojibase.com/emoji/1f4a9/pileofpoo

    Discuss!
  2. Account suspended
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    22 Dec '15 23:25
    This thread is lame man, hurry up and die Kegge
  3. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    22 Dec '15 23:27
    Originally posted by Kegge
    Must be a copy paste thread. So here we go:

    continue this "stream" of senseless copy paste crap like posts. I will start:

    The 'pile of poo' emoji is a special symbol that can be used on smartphones, tablets, and computers. Your device needs to support this particular emoji in order for you to be able to use it, otherwise the emoji may not appear.

    On ...[text shortened]... OS, and other platforms.

    source: https://www.emojibase.com/emoji/1f4a9/pileofpoo

    Discuss!
    A smartphone is a mobile phone with an advanced mobile operating system which combines features of a personal computer operating system with other features useful for mobile or handheld use.[1][2][3] They typically combine the features of a cell phone with those of other popular mobile devices, such as personal digital assistant (PDA), media player and GPS navigation unit. Most smartphones can access the Internet, have a touchscreen user interface, can run third-party apps, music players and are camera phones. Most smartphones produced from 2012 onwards also have high-speed mobile broadband 4G LTE internet, motion sensors, and mobile payment.

    Contents [hide]
    1 History
    1.1 Early years
    1.2 Forerunner
    1.3 PDAs
    1.4 Mass adoption
    1.5 iOS and Android
    1.6 Recent technological developments
    1.7 Future possible developments
    2 Mobile operating systems
    2.1 Android
    2.2 iOS
    2.3 Windows Phone
    2.4 BlackBerry
    2.5 Firefox OS
    2.6 Sailfish OS
    2.7 Tizen
    2.8 Ubuntu Touch
    3 Discontinued mobile operating systems
    3.1 Symbian
    3.2 Windows Mobile
    3.3 Bada
    3.4 Palm OS
    3.5 webOS
    4 Application stores
    5 Display
    6 Market share
    6.1 Smartphone usage
    6.2 By manufacturer
    6.3 By operating system
    6.3.1 Historical sales figures, in millions
    7 Issues
    7.1 Battery life
    7.2 Social
    7.3 Legal
    7.4 Medical
    7.5 Security
    7.6 Sleep
    8 Devices
    9 Other terms
    10 See also
    11 References
    12 External links
    History[edit]
    Early years[edit]

    The first caller identification receiver (1971)
    Devices that combined telephony and computing were first conceptualized by Tesla 1909 and Theodore Paraskevakos in 1971 and patented in 1974, and were offered for sale beginning in 1993. Paraskevakos was the first to introduce the concepts of intelligence, data processing and visual display screens into telephones. In 1971, while he was working with Boeing in Huntsville, Alabama, demonstrated a transmitter and receiver that provided additional ways to communicate with remote equipment, however it did not yet have general purpose PDA applications in a wireless device typical of smartphones. They were installed at Peoples' Telephone Company in Leesburg, Alabama and were demonstrated to several telephone companies. The original and historic working models are still in the possession of Paraskevakos.[4]

    Forerunner[edit]

    IBM Simon and charging base (1994)[5]
    The first mobile phone to incorporate PDA features was an IBM prototype developed in 1992 and demonstrated that year at the COMDEX computer industry trade show. The prototype demonstrated PDA features as well as other visionary apps like maps, stocks and news incorporated with a cellular phone. A refined version of the product was marketed to consumers in 1994 by BellSouth under the name Simon Personal Communicator. The Simon was the first cellular device that can be properly referred to as a "smartphone", although it was not called that in 1994.[6][7][8] In addition to its ability to make and receive cellular phone calls, Simon was able to send and receive faxes and emails and included several other apps like address book, calendar, appointment scheduler, calculator, world time clock, and note pad through its touch screen display. Simon is the first smartphone to be incorporated with the features of a PDA.[9]

    The term "smart phone" first appeared in print in 1995, for describing AT&T's "PhoneWriter Communicator" as a "smart phone".[10]

    PDAs[edit]
    Main article: Personal digital assistant
    In the late 1990s, many mobile phone users carried a separate dedicated PDA device, running early versions of operating systems such as Palm OS, BlackBerry OS or Windows CE/Pocket PC.[1] These operating systems would later evolve into mobile operating systems.

    In March 1996, Hewlett-Packard released the OmniGo 700LX, which was a modified 200LX PDA that supported a Nokia 2110-compatible phone and had integrated software built in ROM to support it. The device featured a 640x200 resolution CGA compatible 4-shade gray-scale LCD screen and could be used to make and receive calls, text messages, emails and faxes. It was also 100% DOS 5.0 compatible, allowing it to run thousands of existing software titles including early versions of Windows.

    In August 1996, Nokia released the Nokia 9000 Communicator which combined a PDA based on the GEOS V3.0 operating system from Geoworks with a digital cellular phone based on the Nokia 2110. The two devices were fixed together via a hinge in what became known as a clamshell design. When opened, the display was on the inside top surface and with a physical QWERTY keyboard on the bottom. The personal organizer provided e-mail, calendar, address book, calculator and notebook with text-based web browsing, and the ability to send and receive faxes. When the personal organizer was closed, it could be used as a digital cellular phone.

    In June 1999, Qualcomm released a "CDMA Digital PCS Smartphone" with integrated Palm PDA and Internet connectivity, known as the "pdQ Smartphone".[11]

    In early 2000, the Ericsson R380 was released by Ericsson Mobile Communications,[12] and was the first device marketed as a "smartphone".[13] It combined the functions of a mobile phone and a PDA, supported limited web browsing with a resistive touchscreen utilizing a stylus.[14]

    In early 2001, Palm, Inc. introduced the Kyocera 6035, which combined a PDA with a mobile phone and operated on Verizon. It also supported limited web browsing.[15][16]

    Smartphones before Android, iOS and BlackBerry, typically ran on Symbian, which was originally developed by Psion. It was the world's most widely used smartphone operating system until the last quarter of 2010.

    Mass adoption[edit]
    In 1999, the Japanese firm NTT DoCoMo released the first smartphones to achieve mass adoption within a country. These phones ran on i-mode, which provided data transmission speeds up to 9.6 kbit/s.[17] Unlike future generations of wireless services, NTT DoCoMo's i-mode used cHTML, a language which restricted some aspects of traditional HTML in favor of increasing data speed for the devices. Limited functionality, small screens and limited bandwidth allowed for phones to use the slower data speeds available.[18]

    The rise of i-mode helped NTT DoCoMo accumulate an estimated 40 million subscribers by the end of 2001. It was also ranked first in market capitalization in Japan and second globally. This power would wane in the face of the rise of 3G and new phones with advanced wireless network capabilities.[19]

    Outside of Japan smartphones were still rare until the introduction of the Danger Hiptop in 2002, which saw moderate success in the US as the T-Mobile Sidekick. Later, in the mid-2000s, devices based on Microsoft's Windows Mobile started to gain popularity among business users in the U.S. The BlackBerry later gained mass adoption in the U.S., and American users popularized the term "CrackBerry" in 2006 due to its addictive nature.[20] The company first released its GSM BlackBerry 6210, BlackBerry 6220, and BlackBerry 6230 devices in 2003.[21]

    Symbian was the most popular smartphone OS in Europe during the middle to late 2000s. Initially, Nokia's Symbian devices were focused on business, similar to Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices at the time. From 2006 onwards, Nokia started producing entertainment-focused smartphones, popularized by the Nseries. In Asia, with the exception of Japan, the trend was similar to that of Europe.[citation needed]

    iOS and Android[edit]
    In 2007, Apple Inc. introduced the iPhone, one of the first smartphones to use a multi-touch interface. The iPhone was notable for its use of a large touchscreen for direct finger input as its main means of interaction, instead of a stylus, keyboard, or keypad typical for smartphones at the time.[22]

    2008 saw the release of the first phone to use Android called the HTC Dream (also known as the T-Mobile G1).[23][24] Android is an open-source platform founded by Andy Rubin and now owned by Google.[25][26] Although Android's adoption was relatively slow at first, it started to gain widespread popularity in 2010, and now dominates the market.

    These new platforms led to the decline of earlier ones. Microsoft, for instance, started a new OS from scratch, called Windows Phone. Nokia abandoned Symbian and partnered with MS to use Windows Phone on its smartphones. Windows Phone then became the third-most-popular OS. Palm's webOS was bought by Hewlett-Packard and later sold to LG Electronics for use on LG smart TVs. BlackBerry Limited, formerly known as Research In Motion, also made a new platform based on QNX, BlackBerry 10.

    The capacitive touchscreen also had a knock-on effect on smartphone form factors. Before 2007 it was common for devices to have a physical numeric keypad or physical QWERTY keyboard in either a candybar or sliding form factor. However, by 2010, there were no top-selling smartphones with physical keypads.

    Recent technological developments[edit]
    In 2013, the Fairphone company launched its first "socially ethical" smartphone at the London Design Festival to address concerns regarding the sourcing of materials in the manufacturing.[27]
    In late 2013, QSAlpha commenced production of a smartphone designed entirely around security, encryption and identity protection.[28]
    In December 2013, the world's first curved OLED technology smartphones were introduced to the retail market with the sale of the Samsung Galaxy Round and LG G Flex models.[29] Samsung phones with more bends and folds in the screens were expected in 2014.[30]
    In early 2014, smartphones were beginning to use Quad HD (2K) 2560x1440 on 5.5" screens with up to 534 PPI on devices such as the LG G3 which is a significant improvement over Apple's Retina Display. Quad HD is used in advanced televisions and computer monitors, but with 110 ppi or less on such larger displays.[31]
    As of 2014, Wi-Fi networks were much used for smartphones. As ...
  4. Account suspended
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    22 Dec '15 23:28
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    A smartphone is a mobile phone with an advanced mobile operating system which combines features of a personal computer operating system with other features useful for mobile or handheld use.[1][2][3] They typically combine the features of a cell phone with those of other popular mobile devices, such as personal digital assistant (PDA), media player and GPS ...[text shortened]... on such larger displays.[31]
    As of 2014, Wi-Fi networks were much used for smartphones. As ...
    thats not a Bobby post thats a Jaywill post.
  5. Subscriberrookie54online
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    22 Dec '15 23:31
    awesome thread...

    Information for Travelers to Mexico
    Entry Requirements for Mexico

    The Country Specific Information Sheet includes such information as the location of the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in the country, immigration practices, health conditions, minor political disturbances, unusual currency and entry regulations, crime and security information, and drug penalties. If unstable conditions exist in a country, a description of the condition may be included. The Country Specific Information Sheet for Mexico can be obtained in the ACS Unit or may be found on the State Department's Home Page at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_970.html.

    Additional information on travel in and to Mexico can be found in the State Department publication Tips for Travelers to Mexico. For specific information on other countries, please visit: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_1764.html.

    Entry Requirements for Mexico

    As of March 1, 2010, all U.S. citizens – including children -- must present a valid passport, book or card, for travel beyond the “border zone” into the interior of Mexico. Entry by any means, for example by plane or car, is included in this requirement. The “border zone” is generally defined as an area between 20 to 30 kilometers of the border with the U.S., depending on the location. Stays of less than 72 hours within the border zone do not require a visa or tourist card.

    U.S. citizens traveling as tourists beyond the border zone or entering Mexico by air must pay a fee to obtain a tourist card, also known as an FM-T, available from Mexican border crossing points, Mexican tourism offices, airports within the border zone and most airlines serving Mexico.

    Upon arrival in Mexico, business travelers must complete and submit a form (Form FM-N 30 days) authorizing the conduct of business, but not employment, for a 30-day period. Travelers entering Mexico for purposes other than tourism or business or for stays of longer than 180 days require a visa and must carry a valid U.S. passport. U.S. citizens planning to work or live in Mexico should apply for the appropriate Mexican visa at the

    Embassy of Mexico

    at
    1911 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20006
    telephone (202)736-1000

    or any Mexican consulate in the United States.

    Entry to the US by land or sea: Regardless of your final destination in Mexico, all U.S. citizens age 16 or over must present either a U.S. passport book or card to re-enter the U.S. by land or sea. Minors under the age of 16 may enter the U.S. via the land border with a certified birth certificate, consular report of birth abroad, citizenship certificate, or naturalization certificate.

    Entry to the US by air: All citizens, regardless of age, entering the U.S. by air must present a U.S. passport book. A passport card is not acceptable for entry to the US by air.

    U.S. legal permanent residents in possession of their I-551 Permanent Resident card may enter the United States from Mexico by land, air, or sea.

    Unaccompanied Minors Departing Mexico

    In order to combat international child abduction or the exploitation of minors, Article 215 of Mexico’s Ley General de Población requires that minor non-Mexican children leaving Mexico must be accompanied by both parents or guardians or be prepared to present written authorization to travel from the absent parent or parents.

    This document must include:
    the name(s) of the authorizing parent(s),
    the name of the child,
    the name(s) of the adult(s) accompanying the child, and
    the notarized signature(s) of the absent parent(s)

    The child must be carrying the original letter – not a faxed or scanned copy – as well as proof of the parent/child relationship (usually a birth certificate) – and an original custody decree, if applicable.

    If there is only one custodial parent, the accompanying adult should be prepared to present documentation to that effect (e.g, a court order granting sole custody to one parent, a death certificate for the absent parent, etc.).
  6. Subscriberrookie54online
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    22 Dec '15 23:36
    http://www.fixingyourfeet.com/

    Fixing Your Feet

    Fixing Your Feet LogoFixing Your Feet provides resources, foot care tips and techniques, and foot care products to help you - runners, adventure racers, hikers, thru-hikers, fastpackers, walkers - in short, anyone using their feet. Whatever your activity or sport, FixingYourFeet.com can help you with foot care tips for happy healthy feet.

    FixingYourFeet.com combines the resources of:

    the book Fixing Your Feet, the 'bible' of foot care for extreme (and everyday) athletes,
    the Happy Feet booklet,
    the Fixing Your Feet Blog.

    This web site features a blog, pages of articles about a variety of foot care issues, foot care products, foot care links, and related books. My 14 plus years of research on different aspects of foot care, product testing, putting my research into print on paper and the Web, patching thousands of feet at walks, marathons, ultramarathons, and adventure races has established my credibility as a foot care expert. To learn more about me, check out the About Me page.

    The Fixing Your Feet Blog on this website now incorporates the former weekly Happy Feet Blog and the monthly Fixing Your Feet E-zine that were located on a different blogging website. All posts from July 2005 through December 2008 are archived here.

    Explore the web site, read the articles, and check out the links. If you don't see what you need, please send me an email: jvonhof@verizon.net

    John Vonhof
  7. SubscriberKewpie
    since 1-Feb-07
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    23 Dec '15 01:44
    Sales on mobile sites and apps< are increasing, especially during the holidays. As mobile purchases rise, so does credit card theft via mobile apps. Last year, credit cards were used in a staggering 53 percent of mobile commerce fraud, according to LexisNexis.

    And according to recent research my own firm just conducted, 100 percent of mobile commerce- related Android apps on Google Play’s top 200 list are decomposable exposing them to the very kind of credit card fraud I experienced.

    To help us all have a safer holiday shopping experience on our mobile devices, here’s a look at the key security threats that shopping apps face – and some advice for both developers and shoppers to better protect themselves:
    Phishing and smashing

    “Phishing” is probably the most common hacking method, especially during the holiday season. Users get e-mails and text messages that contain a special (bogus) offer and a link to a compromised website. People click the link to what they think is a legitimate website, put in their credentials… and this data is secretly sent to the hacker’s server or bank account.

    Similarly, “smashing” messages/texts, which include a malicious link, are also common. One smashing technique that’s especially common during the holiday season is the shipping notification. Everyone is excited about new deliveries, so the fake shipping notification works really well.

    Malicious apps

    During the holidays, we see a rise of malicious apps specially designed for shopping, downloadable through online websites, messages, or app stores. They may promise unprecedented pricing and hard-to-find products, but instead, steal users’ credentials and data, make charges to their accounts, or even take full control of their device.

    In 2014, over 3100 potentially malicious mobile apps targeting Black Friday and Cyber Monday shoppers were detected. Many websites and app stores also offer popular games or holiday-themed games as freebies, but in reality, many of them spread malware. In 2013, thousands of malicious, dummy copies of Angry Birds and Grand Theft Auto 5 were found in Google’s Play Store.

    Exploitation of login reuse

    Mobile phone owners often re-use the same password on multiple sites and services, simply because it’s easier to remember one set for all of them. Unfortunately, this means that if hackers compromise one account, they can compromise many, if not all, of the users’ remaining accounts. This was especially disastrous in the case of the hacked Starbucks app, which prioritized usability and convenience at the expense of security.

    The app allowed “auto-load” of money on the Starbucks card through customers’ linked credit card. Consequently, hackers who drained the account balance of a gift card were also able to steal more money from the linked credit card or bank account. Some Starbucks customers lost hundreds of dollars in a few hours.

    The common practice of reusing logins can lead to chains of fraud across all the websites, services and apps which the same credit card is linked to.

    How mobile developers can better protect their customers

    The best security solution to avoid most hacking attempts is to avoid storing user login information locally, on the app. Instead, store them on a secure server. For similar reasons, communication tokens and keys should be encrypted and dynamically generated. You should also employ pre-emptive security measures to protect your app and source code – here are six reliable strategies.

    Binary protection of the app to prevent source code analysis, reverse engineering and piracy is another good measure – particularly during the holiday season. As we saw with the bogus Angry Birds and GTA apps in recent holiday seasons, fake apps posing as your own often pop up, damaging your brand and trust, causing PR nightmares during the busiest shopping season of the year.
    How mobile customers can better protect themselves

    No app developer can protect its users 100 percent of the time, so it falls on mobile customers to take precautions of their own, especially during the holidays. Don’t click on links in messages sent from unknown people or companies. And if you are going to purchase something from a website that was sent through a text or e-mail message, first Google the URL to make sure it’s legitimate and hasn’t been flagged.

    Related to this, only download shopping apps from legitimate app stores, such as Google Play and the Apple App Store, as they’re much less likely to have malicious apps than third party stores. But even Google and Apple are not entirely secure, so double check that the developer or app distributor is really the retailer, not a malware-infected false app.

    Take a few seconds to read through the developer’s information to ensure you are downloading the right app and, when using it, be cautious about agreeing to unnecessary app permissions.

    Finally, set up alerts to receive text messages for credit card charges as soon as they occur, especially during the holiday, and dispute any bogus charges immediately. As I recently learned myself, while even top retail apps aren’t totally safe from hacking, most credit card companies are interested in protecting customers whose apps have failed them.
  8. Joined
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    23 Dec '15 02:06
    All of the previous responses are really, really enlightening. Thanks to all contributors thus far and please keep them coming. Wow the world of google and googleish sure is amazing.
  9. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    23 Dec '15 02:30
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    All of the previous responses are really, really enlightening. Thanks to all contributors thus far and please keep them coming. Wow the world of google and googleish sure is amazing.
    Kindly avoid emotional responses. Give us lists and picayune details entirely understood by the average person.
  10. SubscriberKewpie
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    23 Dec '15 02:48
    "The 'pile of poo' emoji is a special symbol that can be used on smartphones, tablets, and computers. Your device needs to support this particular emoji in order for you to be able to use it, otherwise the emoji may not appear.

    On many devices, you can use the shortcode :hankey: to add the pile of poo emoji to your messages.

    Different devices may have different versions of the pile of poo emoji. The chart on this page shows how this emoji is displayed on Android, iOS, and other platforms.

    source: https://www.emojibase.com/emoji/1f4a9/pileofpoo"

    Your insights?
  11. Subscriberrookie54online
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    23 Dec '15 02:59
    Julie Sprankles
    October 21 Lifestyle

    You can go ahead and quit this day, because it isn't going to get any better than it just did — iOS 9.1 is here, and the middle finger emoji officially exists now. I know. It's almost too much to take in on a Wednesday afternoon. Of course, the middle finger emoji isn't the only oh-so-important feature Apple rolled out with the update; iPhone and iPad users are also now privy to new wallpapers, motion support for Live Photos, and more. Did I mention the fact that middle finger joins more than 100 new emoji, putting it in the company of the Vulcan Salute as well as iMessage symbols for tacos, burritos, and cheese wedges? Heyyyoooo! Still, let's get real: We cannot wait to commence overusing the ever-loving heck out of the long-awaited middle finger emoji.

    But, lest Android users slink away in a sad state of middle finger emoji lacking dejection, hark: Android WhatsApp users have actually been enjoying the use of the middle finger emoji since August. As for the rest of the new iOS emoji, though? Alas, Android users will simply have to wait. (WhatsApp comes close, but no taco.)

    Since we're all dying to download the update and start flipping everyone and their proverbial brother the digital bird, though, here's the scoop for all you happy Apples out there. To install iOS 9.1, simply go to Settings > Software Update, and wait for the magical new emoji to flood you with joy.

    Until then, check out a few stellar suggestions for ways to use the middle finger emoji once you've downloaded it. We've been waiting for it for so long that you may as well get as much use as possible out of it, right?
    1. In Total Excess

    They say two heads are better than one, and I contend the same logic applies to middle finger emojis — only, for dramatic effect, the ratio should be more like six middle finger emoji are better than one.
    2. In Your Bio

    If you've got a profile that needs sprucing up, toss a few middle fingers in that sucker. It would lend a certain je ne sais quoi, don't you think? Or, at the very least, inform people you heart emoticons. Just, y'know, be aware of how it's going to look in professional settings (that is, not very).
    3. When You're Trying To Be Succinct

    The middle finger emoji is gonna save me a whole lot of typing tbh
    — Hilary Banks (@politicallyivy) October 21, 2015

    It takes so much more time, energy, and character count to tell someone off using words than it does to send them a middle finger emoji. Just think of it as the personification of Staples' "Easy Button."
    4. When You Realize You're Out Of Coffee

    Picture this: You wake up and head into the kitchen to fix your morning cup of joe... only to realize you used the last of your coffee yesterday. Middle finger emoji all day. (I'm looking at you, life.)
    5. When BFF Says Unicorn Emoji Trumps Middle Finger Emoji

    If only there was an emoji of a unicorn flipping the bird — then our lives would really be complete. Until then, putting your delusional bestie in check with a well-timed middle finger emoji or two will have to do.
    6. In a Moment of Authenticity

    Real talk: You haven't truly been able to be your authentic self on social media prior to this moment, because you did not have an emoji to match all of the middle fingers in your inner monologue. Now you do, my friend. We all do.
    7. As a Punctuation Mark

    I mean, it does kind of look like a little exclamation point. And what better way to end a sentence, really?
    8. Just Because

    you have no idea how many times will i be using the new middle finger emoji
    — aina (@ainafthah) October 21, 2015

    There is a pattern emerging here, and you may have picked up on it — there is no wrong way to use the middle finger emoji. Got a new car? Send someone the middle finger emoji! Just had your teeth cleaned? Send someone the middle finger emoji! Life is rife with possibilities now. Thanks for that, iOS 9.1. You have our undying love and affection.
  12. Subscriberrookie54online
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    23 Dec '15 03:00
    i wish my name was sprankles...
    then it would rhyme with cankles...
  13. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    23 Dec '15 03:251 edit
    Originally posted by rookie54
    [b][b]
    Different devices may have different versions of the pile of poo emoji. The chart on this page shows how this emoji is displayed on Android, iOS, and other platforms.

    source: https://www.emojibase.com/emoji/1f4a9/pileofpoo

    Discuss!

    On behalf of Russ and the larger RHP community I thank you for this
    objective/subjective and mature post containing/pertaining most pertinent
    considerations of/and together with those respecting your own views as
    always.
  14. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    23 Dec '15 05:05
    Nice work, Kegge. Your thread is absolutely viable. It's also cryable, sighable, and somewhat liable. 😵
  15. SubscriberKewpie
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    23 Dec '15 06:10
    Originally posted by rookie54
    Julie Sprankles
    October 21 Lifestyle

    You can go ahead and quit this day, because it isn't going to get any better than it just did — iOS 9.1 is here, and the middle finger emoji officially exists now. I know. It's almost too much to take in on a Wednesday afternoon. Of course, the middle finger emoji isn't the only oh-so-important feature Apple rolled o ...[text shortened]... rife with possibilities now. Thanks for that, iOS 9.1. You have our undying love and affection.
    rookie54, thanks for insuring the integrity of the thread's original post.
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