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General Forum

  1. Donationmwmiller
    RHP Member No.16
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    13 Mar '18 16:391 edit
    Which is better, Marmite or Vegamite?
    I have heard that they are the same thing, and I have also heard they are very different.
    So which is it?

    I googled a little information on each of them and pasted them here. I would have posted this in "debates" but they're pretty busy over there solving all the rest of the world's problems, so I thought I would just put it in here. 🙂

    MARMITE
    Cut and paste from: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-13541148

    Marmite has been in the news after it was reported that Denmark had banned it.
    In fact it can be sold but only if a licence is granted by the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration.

    Here are 10 things you maybe did not know about the "love it or hate it" spread.

    1. It was invented by accident. In the late 19th Century a German scientist, Justus Liebig, discovered brewer's yeast could be concentrated, bottled and eaten. In 1902 the Marmite Food Company was founded in Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, where the raw material was readily available from the town's brewers. The original recipe contained salt, spices and celery. Later folic acid, vitamin B12, thiamin and riboflavin - vitamins which occur naturally in some foods - were added in high concentrations.

    2. Marmite won two world wars. OK, that's not strictly true. But it was included in soldiers' rations in World War I and, along with bully beef, Spam and condensed milk, it was popular among civilians and the military between 1939 and 1945. In 1999 the company sent extra supplies to homesick British peacekeeping troops in Kosovo.

    3. Marmite is French. Well, the name comes from the name of a French casserole dish called a marmite (pronounced Marmeet). In the Normandy port of Dieppe, a popular fish stew is known as a Marmite Dieppoise. Ever since the 1920s the red and yellow label on the jar has had a picture of a marmite on it.

    4. Jail staff are not keen on it. There's an urban myth that it is banned in British prisons because it can be used to make hooch. In 2002 it was reported that inmates at Featherstone jail, near Wolverhampton, were using it, along with fermented fruit and vegetables, to make moonshine. In 2009 it was reported that inmates at Dartmoor prison were cooking up a brew called a Marmite Mule. But a Prison Service spokesman said on Wednesday it was not banned as it could not be used to make any alcoholic drinks.

    5. There's more than one Marmite. In New Zealand and Australia the Sanitarium Health and Wellbeing company sells Marmite but it has added caramel and sugar to its version, which obviously gives it a sweeter taste. Sanitarium bought the rights to use the brand name back in 1908.

    6. Marmite does not just come in jars. Other products in the range which you might also hate are Marmite Mini Cheddar Bites, Marmite crisps, Marmite jumbo rice cakes and Marmite flavoured oven-baked cashew nuts.

    7.Marmite used to be made in London. The product became so popular that the company's factory in Burton-on-Trent could not keep up so they converted a former brewery in Vauxhall, south London to create a second plant. One resident of the area recalls on a local history blog: "When I was a kid we lived near the Marmite factory at Vauxhall. The smell from the factory was disgusting! People living close by applied to have their rates reduced because of the stench (they failed of course)." The factory closed in 1967.

    8. A sculpture has been built in Marmite's honour. Last year Unilever, the conglomerate which owns the brand, spent £15,000 on a sculpture of a Marmite jar. The sculpture, nicknamed Monumite, now takes pride of place next to the main library in Burton-on-Trent.

    9. Marmite may keep away mosquitoes. Several newspapers, including the Guardian, the Sun and the Daily Telegraph, have claimed the yeasty spread to be the perfect defence against mozzies.

    10. It's good for you. Despite the Danish doubts about the effects on people's health, Marmite could actually be good for you. Nutritionist Melanie Brown says: "Marmite plays such a useful part in many people's diet, and it's incredibly useful for older people who are short in vitamin B-12. It's full of folic acid, and there's lots of evidence that many women, young women of child-bearing age are deficient in folic acid."

    VEGEMITE
    Cut and pasted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Vegemite is a thick, black Australian food spread made from leftover brewers' yeast extract with various vegetable and spice additives. It was developed by Cyril Percy Callister in Melbourne, Victoria in 1922. The Vegemite brand was owned by Mondelez International, but was acquired by the Australian Bega Cheese group following an agreement in January 2017.

    A spread for sandwiches, toast, crumpets and cracker biscuits as well as a filling for pastries, Vegemite is similar to British, New Zealand and South African Marmite, Australian Promite, MightyMite, AussieMite, OzEmite and Swiss Cenovis.

    Vegemite is salty, slightly bitter, malty, and rich in glutamates – giving it an umami flavour similar to beef bouillon.

    History

    In 1919, following the disruption of British Marmite imports after World War I and prior to the introduction of Vegemite, Callister's employer, the Australian company Fred Walker & Co., gave him the task of developing a spread from the used yeast being dumped by breweries. Callister had been hired by the chairman Fred Walker.

    Vegemite was registered as a trademark in Australia that same year. Callister used autolysis to break down the yeast cells from waste obtained from the Carlton & United brewery. Concentrating the clear liquid extract and blending with salt, celery and onion extracts formed a sticky black paste. Fred Walker's company first created and sold Vegemite in 1922.

    Following a nationwide competition to find a name for the new spread, the name "Vegemite" was selected out of a hat by Fred Walker's daughter, Sheilah. The winners, local sisters Hilda and Laurel Armstrong (aged 18 and 20 at the time) of Albert Park, Victoria entered the winning name and were known as "The Vegemite Girls" for the rest of their long lives. Vegemite first appeared on the market in 1923 with advertising emphasising the value of Vegemite to children's health but failed to sell very well. Faced with growing competition from Marmite, from 1928 to 1935 the product was renamed as "Parwill" to make use of the advertising slogan "Marmite but Parwill", a convoluted pun on the new name and that of its competitor; "If Ma [mother] might... then Pa [father] will." This attempt to expand market share was unsuccessful and the name was changed back to Vegemite, but did not recover lost market share.

    In 1925, Walker had established the Kraft Walker Cheese Co. as a joint venture company with J.L. Kraft & Bros to market processed cheese and, following the failure of Parwill, in 1935 he used the success of Kraft Walker Cheese to promote Vegemite.

    In a two-year campaign to promote sales, Vegemite was given away free with Kraft Walker cheese products (with a coupon redemption) and this was followed by poetry competitions with imported American Pontiac cars being offered as prizes. Sales responded and in 1939 Vegemite was officially endorsed by the British Medical Association as a rich source of B vitamins.

    Rationed in Australia during World War II, Vegemite was included in Australian Army rations and by the late 1940s was used in nine out of ten Australian homes.

    In April 1984, a 115-gram jar of vegemite became the first product in Australia to be electronically scanned at a checkout.

    Vegemite is produced in Australia at Mondelez's Port Melbourne manufacturing facility which produces more than 22 million jars per year. Virtually unchanged from Callister's original recipe, Vegemite now far outsells Marmite and other similar spreads in Australia. The billionth jar of Vegemite was produced in October 2008.

    Vegemite was also produced in New Zealand for over 50 years, but as of August 2006 New Zealand production had ceased.
  2. Subscriberlemondrop
    pawn grabber
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    13 Mar '18 19:25
    I like the aussie brand
  3. SubscriberVery Rusty
    Treat Everyone Equal
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    13 Mar '18 19:36
    Originally posted by @mwmiller
    Which is better, Marmite or Vegamite?
    I have heard that they are the same thing, and I have also heard they are very different.
    So which is it?

    I googled a little information on each of them and pasted them here. I would have posted this in "debates" but they're pretty busy over there solving all the rest of the world's problems, so I thought I would ...[text shortened]... duced in New Zealand for over 50 years, but as of August 2006 New Zealand production had ceased.
    A battle between Vegemite and Marmite. That's right, the age-old war of the concentrated yeast extract spread. Marmite, a British favorite and Vegemite, an Australian staple, are what we'd refer to as an acquired taste.Mar 5, 2013
    Vegemite vs. Marmite Taste Test: Can You Tell The Difference ...
    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/.../vegemite-vs-marmite-taste_n_2807624.htm...

    COPIED AND PASTED JUST SO ANDY IS AWARE!!!! 😉 😛

    -VR
  4. Dumnonia
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    13 Mar '18 19:48
    I skint think Vegemite is sold in the UK; perhaps after Brexit it will be.
  5. Standard memberapathist
    looking for loot
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    13 Mar '18 21:30
    My only point of reference, besides a fun rock song, is

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2738265/American-kids-taste-test-Vegemite-reactions-priceless.html
  6. Subscribermoonbus
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    13 Mar '18 21:58
    Marmite makes the roof of my mouth itch. Acquired taste indeed!
  7. Standard memberapathist
    looking for loot
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    13 Mar '18 21:59
    Originally posted by @apathist
    ...a fun rock song,...
    I like the flute. Not easy to pull that off.
  8. Joined
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    13 Mar '18 23:34
    We can't buy Marmite here in our part of Indonesia, so we and others bring it back over when we go home to Blightey. We can buy Vegemite, but for someone born and raised on Marmite it just ain't the same. Vegemite's okay to cook with but on bread, forget it. As a general rule it seems you have to be raised eating one of them to tolerate either; I've not met anyone yet who came to either later in life, and people of mature years trying them for the first time tend to find the taste disgusting, unless anyone out there knows different....Personally I can't imagine life without Marmite; (well okay that's an exaggeration but you know what I mean) if you have a Marmite moment nothing else cuts the Mustard, so to speak.
  9. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    The Axe man
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    13 Mar '18 23:43
    Originally posted by @mwmiller
    Which is better, Marmite or Vegamite?
    I have heard that they are the same thing, and I have also heard they are very different.
    So which is it?

    I googled a little information on each of them and pasted them here. I would have posted this in "debates" but they're pretty busy over there solving all the rest of the world's problems, so I thought I would ...[text shortened]... duced in New Zealand for over 50 years, but as of August 2006 New Zealand production had ceased.
    Bit of Marmite in your soup instead of stock. Mmmmm
  10. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    The Axe man
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    13 Mar '18 23:48
    Check out Will Ferrel and Kevin Hart on the footy show for an American take on vegemite
    Check out Hugh Jackman on Jimmy Falon for the rite way to enjoy vegemite
    If u dont get a laugh I will give u a refund
  11. SubscriberSuzianne
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    14 Mar '18 02:01
    Originally posted by @indonesia-phil
    We can't buy Marmite here in our part of Indonesia, so we and others bring it back over when we go home to Blightey. We can buy Vegemite, but for someone born and raised on Marmite it just ain't the same. Vegemite's okay to cook with but on bread, forget it. As a general rule it seems you have to be raised eating one of them to tolerate either; I've ...[text shortened]... t you know what I mean) if you have a Marmite moment nothing else cuts the Mustard, so to speak.
    I'm an American, honey, and as an all-American girl raised on peanut butter, I find both Marmite and Vegemite to be disgusting.

    I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.
  12. Joined
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    14 Mar '18 02:19
    Originally posted by @suzianne
    I'm an American, honey, and as an all-American girl raised on peanut butter, I find both Marmite and Vegemite to be disgusting.

    I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.
    Once again Brits and Americans united by their differences, it's all cool.
  13. SubscriberFMF
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    14 Mar '18 03:10
    Marmite is superb. Vegemite, with more of a sour aftertaste than Marmite's salty one, is alright. New Zealand's licencing of Marmite ~ the only stuff going by that name that's permitted/available in the Antipodes - gives us a very disappointing honey-gone-badly-wrong version of Marmite. In Australia, there is Our Mate [https://tinyurl.com/y7wf2dlt] - which is Marmite - but I scarcely ever saw it in the shops, so the one to go with is Promite [https://tinyurl.com/y9ujqvme]. I get my Marmite here in Indonesia from a Dutch guy who pops over three times a year. I have 3 kgs of Marmite coming on 2nd April in the suitcases of a couple of UK friends who are visiting.
  14. Standard memberwolfgang59
    Mr. Wolf
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    14 Mar '18 03:441 edit
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    I skint think Vegemite is sold in the UK; perhaps after Brexit it will be.
    Vegemite used to be available in the Barnet branch of Waitrose!

    But why? It tastes like $h1t. As bad as Antipodean marmite.

    We buy the real stuff in NZ labelled as "Our Mate"
    (the original Marmite recipe before they sweetened it)
  15. Standard memberwolfgang59
    Mr. Wolf
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    14 Mar '18 03:45
    Originally posted by @fmf
    I have 3 kgs of Marmite coming on 2nd April in the suitcases of a couple of UK friends who are visiting.
    Who's your mule?
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