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  1. 13 Nov '07 14:18
    Thought I'd start a thread to see which chess book people like the most, either because they got the most out of it or just really enjoyed it.

    For me its probably The Art of Checkmate. I got a lot out of it, but also really enjoyed it and it changed my game for the better after I read it.
  2. 13 Nov '07 14:23
    Best Lessons of a Chess Coach - Sunil Weeramantry.
  3. 13 Nov '07 14:39
    Its a toss up between Art of Attack by Vukovic or How To Reasses Your Chess 3rd ed by Silman. I think I got the most out of Silman's book
  4. 13 Nov '07 15:18
    Amateur's mind
  5. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    13 Nov '07 16:19
    Understanding Chess Tactics by Martin Weteschnik followed closely by Reassess your Chess by Silman.

    D
  6. 13 Nov '07 23:49
    Probably the only chess book that I would consider a "must read", is Irving Chernev's, "Logical Chess: Move by Move." I give it an A+ for quality of writing, and an A+ for content.
  7. 13 Nov '07 23:54
    How to Become a Deadly Chess Tactician - David Lemoir
  8. 13 Nov '07 23:56
    The Guide to Good Chess and On the Endgame both by C.J.S. Purdy.
  9. Standard member Fleabitten
    Love thy bobblehead
    14 Nov '07 00:04
    From a learning perspective: How to Reassess Your Chess- 3rd Edition by Silman

    From a simply entertaining perspective- Garry Kasparov's My Great Predecessors Volume 5- Korchnoi & Karpov
  10. 14 Nov '07 16:43
    I also like Logical Chess:move by move. Very good primer. I also like Chess:5,334 Problems, combinations, and games by Polgar. With those two books somebody can get a pretty good start.
  11. 14 Nov '07 16:43
    "Capablanca's Best Chess Endings," by Chernev.
  12. 14 Nov '07 18:11
    Chess - Middlegame.Plan ~ Peter Arsenievich Romanovsky
  13. Standard member Red Night
    RHP Prophet
    14 Nov '07 19:02
    My System
  14. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    15 Nov '07 14:39
    Originally posted by gaychessplayer
    Probably the only chess book that I would consider a "must read", is Irving Chernev's, "Logical Chess: Move by Move." I give it an A+ for quality of writing, and an A+ for content.
    An A should never carry a +


    As for the books, I find it extremely difficult to settle on one best. The most dramatic improvement in my quality of play came after I began to read Chernev's 1000 Best Short Games of Chess. which I found in the Cannon AFB library in 1975. Over the next several years, Horowitz, Chess Openings: Theory and Practice became a Bible, while several tournament books were my steady fare--San Antonio 1972, Soviet Championship 1972 (alas I got rid of these two books), and Wijk aan Zee 1975 (which I have still). Add to these Gligoric's Best Games, 1945-1970 and Karpov's Collected Games, 1961-1974 and we've completed the bulk of a teenager's library forming the foundation for lifelong chess study.

    In recent years, two books have been enormously significant. Renaud and Kahn, The Art of the Checkmate taught me much about what I thought I already knew (and didn't), and has an enormous effect on how I teach chess.

    Jeremy Silman's The Amateur's Mind and How to Reassess Your Chess--one book in two parts--has taught me how to listen to the pieces.
  15. 15 Nov '07 15:14
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    An A should never carry a +


    As for the books, I find it extremely difficult to settle on one best. The most dramatic improvement in my quality of play came after I began to read Chernev's 1000 Best Short Games of Chess. which I found in the Cannon AFB library in 1975. Over the next several years, Horowitz, Chess Openings: Theory and Pra ...[text shortened]... assess Your Chess--one book in two parts--has taught me how to listen to the pieces.
    "...while several tournament books were my steady fare--San Antonio 1972..."

    The Church's Fried Chicken tournament! That's one of the most humorous tournament sponsor names I've heard of.

    "Renaud and Kahn, The Art of the Checkmate taught me much about what I thought I already knew (and didn't), and has an enormous effect on how I teach chess."

    I've heard others recommend this book, but now I just HAVE to get it!

    "Jeremy Silman's The Amateur's Mind and How to Reassess Your Chess--one book in two parts--has taught me how to listen to the pieces."

    The pieces don't say diddly squat to me. I guess I still have a long way to go... (sigh)