Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member obliteration
    Net Preneur
    12 Oct '05 19:58
    Out of all the GM's there have ever been, who has been your favorite and why?
  2. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    12 Oct '05 20:30
    Tal for all of his wild sacrifices and Capablanca for his incredible natural ability.
  3. 12 Oct '05 20:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by obliteration
    Out of all the GM's there have ever been, who has been your favorite and why?
    Talkasparovspasskyfischer is a great attacking player, probably the greatest.
  4. 12 Oct '05 20:41
    Originally posted by obliteration
    Out of all the GM's there have ever been, who has been your favorite and why?
    Why does he/she have to be a GM? That's just plain discrimination.
  5. 12 Oct '05 20:55
    Originally posted by obliteration
    Out of all the GM's there have ever been, who has been your favorite and why?
    He is Morphy, and Alekhine and Tal (Kasparov too). hard to chose.

    If there is one then....Hmmm, maybe Alekhine since he is the best of all
  6. 13 Oct '05 00:01
    Originally posted by obliteration
    Out of all the GM's there have ever been, who has been your favorite and why?
    My mom is my favorite chess player and she is not a gm or anything she is a housewife.
  7. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    13 Oct '05 00:16
    Originally posted by tolikcheturi
    My mom is my favorite chess player and she is not a gm or anything she is a housewife.
    Your choice is touching. But your reason is odd.
  8. Standard member leestatic
    Hristos voskrese
    13 Oct '05 00:29
    Lasker
    In 1894 he became the second World Chess Champion by defeating Steinitz with 10 wins, 4 draws and 5 losses. He maintained this title for 27 years, the longest unbroken tenure of any officially recognised World Champion of chess. His great tournament wins include London (1899), St Petersburg (1896 and 1914), New York (1924). He would also take great risks.
  9. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    13 Oct '05 00:42
    Emanuel Lasker!

    One of the few grandmasters whose annotations of his losses celebrate the victor. See Lasker's Manual of Chess and his annotations of Pillsbury - Lasker Nuremburg, 1896.
  10. 13 Oct '05 22:18
    Paul Morphy. He was the first player to use well founded positional principles in open positions. He kept his techniques secret (unlike Steinitz) so his genius was unappreciated until long after his death. Before him players played only combinatively, and were unable to match him.
  11. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    13 Oct '05 23:05
    Originally posted by leestatic
    Lasker
    In 1894 he became the second World Chess Champion by defeating Steinitz with 10 wins, 4 draws and 5 losses. He maintained this title for 27 years, the longest unbroken tenure of any officially recognised World Champion of chess. His great tournament wins include London (1899), St Petersburg (1896 and 1914), New York (1924). He would also take great risks.
    Bravo,leestatic! Lasker is also my favorite,because of his fighting spirit,and his view that chess,above all else,is a fight. His must win against Capa at St. Petersburg,1914,still rates as one of the greatest games in history,and one of the greatest pieces of chess "psyching out" that ever was. If I had to select the one player to play the game to save the universe,it would be Lasker,hands down.
  12. 13 Oct '05 23:26
    Lasker is a great player but as Fischer put it he is a coffee house player. (Fischer is just too accurate in whatever he spits out from his brilliant mind). He always played it for the man and he was able to win scientificly lost games by just playing against the temper of any given opponent. I am not saying Lasker is bad here, I admire him.Fischer thought he was a crappy player and could not survive if he lived today.

    A comment from my favorite chess genius Alekhine: ''Lasker was my teacher, and without him I could not have become whom I became. The idea of chess art is unthinkable without Emanuel Lasker''.
  13. 13 Oct '05 23:35
    Originally posted by mufin78man
    Paul Morphy. He was the first player to use well founded positional principles in open positions. He kept his techniques secret (unlike Steinitz) so his genius was unappreciated until long after his death. Before him players played only combinatively, and were unable to match him.
    I think you are right and I reccomend everybody (who likes open games of course) to study his games. They are just really really really brilliant. Taking it to account that he played 100 years ago it is just impossible that a man like him lived then. Also I have read that he only took 5 minutes for his moves whereas his opponents took 10 hours for a single move since then there was no chess clock available.

    But still I like the modern GM Alekhine the most among other alternatives I have mentioned. Namely Kasparov, Fischer, Tal and Morphy. He prepered well for his openings, his tactical blows are still unexplainable, his middle game and engame understanding and play is the best of his time. Most importantly, he out-calculculated everybody including Capa. He is the only World Champion who dies while holding the title. Truly, he is an all around modern GM example in my opinion.
  14. Standard member Aiko
    Nearing 200000...!
    14 Oct '05 00:44
    Originally posted by obliteration
    Out of all the GM's there have ever been, who has been your favorite and why?
    I hardly know any GM's, but I happen to know one in person. I don't know if many up here ever heard of him, his name is Dimitri Reinderman. I guess he is a favorite if I 'have' to have one.
  15. 14 Oct '05 02:46
    Originally posted by Aiko
    I hardly know any GM's, but I happen to know one in person. I don't know if many up here ever heard of him, his name is Dimitri Reinderman. I guess he is a favorite if I 'have' to have one.
    I recommend you buy Kasparov's last book. It is a 4 book set and *very expensive* but it is just great. You money will not be wasted as it will be a nice classic in your library for years to come.