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Science Forum

  1. Standard member blunderdog
    R.I.P. mikelom
    11 Jan '17 13:15 / 1 edit
    sorry...was trying to add to the "The age of the universe thread"

    It's been awhile since I've been here
  2. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 10:23
    Time is a good subject on its own. Things change, time is a measurement of that fact. That is all. No deeper meaning. These are not the droids.
  3. 15 Jan '17 11:48 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by apathist
    . Things change, time is a measurement of that fact. .
    Not sure what that means but, depending on what you mean by that, that might be incorrect; Some specified thing might either change in some specified way or fail to change in that same specified way within, say, one second, and that one second will have the same magnitude (of one arbitrary unit of time) regardless of whether that change took place. Therefore, measuring that one second will not measure that change in at least that narrow sense.
  4. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 15:35
    Originally posted by humy
    Not sure what that means but, depending on what you mean by that, that might be incorrect; Some specified thing might either change in some specified way or fail to change in that same specified way within, say, one second, and that one second will have the same magnitude (of one arbitrary unit of time) regardless of whether that change took place. Therefore, measuring that one second will not measure that change in at least that narrow sense.
    Nothing is static, ever, if we look close enough. Research this subject and learn that time is our measurement of change. I didn't make that fact up. There is a weird philosophical problem when we imagine that our entire knowable universe freezes up for a while - as if there's a god-time clock ticking way while our reality does not change at all.

    Our measurement of time is arbitrary, as you say. We do have trouble coordinating our many systems of measurement. Days and years are based on different systems and don't quite match up, right. You grok that yes, but believe in god-time?
  5. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 15:38
    In the International System of Units (SI), the unit of time is the second (symbol: s {\displaystyle \mathrm {s} } \mathrm {s} ). It is a SI base unit, and it is currently defined as "the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom". [12] This definition is based on the operation of a caesium atomic clock.

    That was wiki
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_in_physics
  6. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 15:40
    Time has long been an important subject of study in religion, philosophy, and science, but defining it in a manner applicable to all fields without circularity has consistently eluded scholars.[2][6][7][9][10][11]

    That was wiki
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time
  7. 15 Jan '17 20:07 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by apathist
    Research this subject and learn that time is our measurement of change.
    this is simply not true. No such thing has ever been established. Time doesn't cease to exist if we didn't measure it. Before the first person measured time, did time exist?
  8. 15 Jan '17 20:12
    Originally posted by apathist
    In the International System of Units (SI), the unit of time is the second (symbol: s {\displaystyle \mathrm {s} } \mathrm {s} ). It is a SI base unit, and it is currently defined as "the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom". [12] This ...[text shortened]... ation of a caesium atomic clock.

    That was wiki
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_in_physics
    how we measure time is not what time is. Yes, we measure it by observing certain changes but that doesn't entail those changes define what time is.
    Does the same time pass if we don't bother to measure it or if all the clocks break and stop or does time stop if we don't bother to measure it?
  9. 15 Jan '17 20:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by apathist
    Time has long been an important subject of study in religion,
    stop right there; religion has no valid say on the matter. Don't include religion on your list.
  10. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 23:09
    Originally posted by humy
    this is simply not true. No such thing has ever been established. Time doesn't cease to exist if we didn't measure it. Before the first person measured time, did time exist?
    Change 'time' to 'change', and bring it back to me.
  11. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 23:16
    Originally posted by humy
    stop right there; religion has no valid say on the matter. Don't include religion on your list.
    No, humy. I don't hate religion and am not afraid of it. Religion was crucial to the rise of our kind. It will inhabit our starships. Because pure science is ignorant.
  12. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    15 Jan '17 23:21
    Originally posted by humy
    how we measure time is not what time is. Yes, we measure it by observing certain changes but that doesn't entail those changes define what time is.
    Does the same time pass if we don't bother to measure it or if all the clocks break and stop or does time stop if we don't bother to measure it?
    I already asked that question. So you believe in god-time.

    What if god-time stopped flowing, and the then restarted? How could we tell?

    We could not. All we have is the movement we see in reality.
  13. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    16 Jan '17 00:04
    http://faculty.uca.edu/rnovy/Aristotle--Time%20is%20the%20Measure.htm
    Aristotle: Time is the Measure of Change

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time
    Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.[1][2][3] Time is a component quantity of various measurements used to sequence events, to compare the duration of events or the intervals between them, and to quantify rates of change of quantities in material reality or in the conscious experience.[4][5][6][7] Time is often referred to as the fourth dimension, along with the three spatial dimensions.[8]

    I did not make this stuff up. Time is not best viewed as a spatial dimension, though. We cannot go back.
  14. Standard member lemon lime
    blah blah blah
    16 Jan '17 02:26
    Originally posted by humy
    this is simply not true. No such thing has ever been established. Time doesn't cease to exist if we didn't measure it. Before the first person measured time, did time exist?
    Time doesn't cease to exist if we didn't measure it. Before the first person measured time, did time exist?

    Yes, time did not exist before the first person measured it...

    Along the same line:
    • Space didn't exist before the first person measured it.
    • Dinosaurs didn't exist before the first dino bone was discovered.
    • The world didn't exist until after I was born.
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    16 Jan '17 04:10
    Originally posted by apathist
    I already asked that question. So you believe in god-time.

    What if god-time stopped flowing, and the then restarted? How could we tell?

    We could not. All [b]we
    have is the movement we see in reality.[/b]
    You do know, I hope, that time flow is a variable, first depending on how deep you are into a gravity well and second how much velocity you have relative to other objects so if you manage to go say at 99% of c, and you journey 7 light years away, only one year passes in your spacecraft but 7 years goes by on Earth. That is a fact.