1. Standard memberyo its me
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    03 Sep '11 14:58
    Forgivness is a big part of most (maybe all??) religions, I was wondering, to all the atheists- do you beleive in forgiving someone?
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    03 Sep '11 14:59
    Originally posted by yo its me
    Forgivness is a big part of most (maybe all??) religions, I was wondering, to all the atheists- do you beleive in forgiving someone?
    Nah, when we are slighted, we go after the entire family that slights us. Get the grandparents too and their pet dog.
  3. Standard memberavalanchethecat
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    03 Sep '11 15:131 edit
    Originally posted by yo its me
    Forgivness is a big part of most (maybe all??) religions, I was wondering, to all the atheists- do you beleive in forgiving someone?
    Yes.

    (edit - atheist only in the broadest sense, ie not theist)
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    03 Sep '11 15:201 edit
    Originally posted by yo its me
    Forgivness is a big part of most (maybe all??) religions, I was wondering, to all the atheists- do you beleive in forgiving someone?
    i dont think its a part of Judaism or Islam, not sure about Hinduism, Buddhism or others
    . Both Judaism and Islam put the emphasis on reparation being made, rather than
    forgiveness being exercised.
  5. Standard memberavalanchethecat
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    03 Sep '11 15:26
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i dont think its a part of Judaism or Islam, not sure about Hinduism, Buddhism or others
    . Both Judaism and Islam put the emphasis on reparation being made, rather than
    forgiveness being exercised.
    I think that forgiveness is unnecessary in buddhism, because there is nothing to forgive.
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    03 Sep '11 15:292 edits
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    I think that forgiveness is unnecessary in buddhism, because there is nothing to forgive.
    interesting, I watched Enter the dragon last night, Bruce Lee made some similar
    comments, 'there is no opponent because there is no I'. How is this possible, this
    existence or non existence? Are they viewed as unrealities or illusions?
  7. SubscriberSuzianne
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    03 Sep '11 15:30
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    I think that forgiveness is unnecessary in buddhism, because there is nothing to forgive.
    Those crazy Nihilists...

    😀

    (DISCLAIMER: This is meant as a joke. I do not think Buddhists are crazy. So please don't come after my grandmother or my dog, thanks.)
  8. Standard memberavalanchethecat
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    03 Sep '11 15:35
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    interesting, I watched Enter the dragon last night, Bruce Lee made some similar
    comments, 'there is no opponent because there is no I'. How is this possible, this
    existence or non existence? Are they viewed as unrealities or illusions?
    I can't speak for Bruce Lee, and I'm probably off the mark for buddhists in general tbh (i'm a rank beginner on this path), but as I see it, in order to forgive, one would necessarily be offended or slighted. The right and proper course is, I think, to not take offence in the first place.
  9. Standard memberavalanchethecat
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    03 Sep '11 15:37
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Those crazy Nihilists...

    😀

    (DISCLAIMER: This is meant as a joke. I do not think Buddhists are crazy. So please don't come after my grandmother or my dog, thanks.)
    Too late, ninjas already on route... 🙂
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    03 Sep '11 15:39
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    I can't speak for Bruce Lee, and I'm probably off the mark for buddhists in general tbh (i'm a rank beginner on this path), but as I see it, in order to forgive, one would necessarily be offended or slighted. The right and proper course is, I think, to not take offence in the first place.
    Yes that makes sense. I was thinking that in order to take offence the ego must be
    involved and if it is our intent to stamp out the ego, then forgiveness would be
    unnecessary as there is no ego to be incited.
  11. SubscriberFMF
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    03 Sep '11 16:08
    Originally posted by yo its me
    Forgivness is a big part of most (maybe all??) religions, I was wondering, to all the atheists- do you beleive in forgiving someone?
    Forgiveness is ok. But empathy is more crucial when it comes to ethics, morals and people getting along.
  12. SubscriberSuzianne
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    03 Sep '11 16:13
    Originally posted by FMF
    Forgiveness is ok. But empathy is more crucial when it comes to ethics, morals and people getting along.
    Agreed.

    "Turning the other cheek" is ok. But the higher calling is to "Love thy neighbor as thyself".
  13. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
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    03 Sep '11 16:21
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i dont think its a part of Judaism or Islam, not sure about Hinduism, Buddhism or others
    . Both Judaism and Islam put the emphasis on reparation being made, rather than
    forgiveness being exercised.
    Forgiveness is considered a desirable attribute in Hindu culture. But religious significance? Not known. One of the attributes of God is Mercy. He called the Ocean of Mercy. And one of the requirements of the person intending to walk the spiritual path is that he should be forbearing. He should be able to suffer all the misery coming his way without a murmur. This quality of forbearance is called Titiksha.
  14. Cape Town
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    03 Sep '11 17:03
    Originally posted by yo its me
    Forgivness is a big part of most (maybe all??) religions, I was wondering, to all the atheists- do you beleive in forgiving someone?
    Forgiveness by whom and to whom?

    Yes, I personally do forgive people, but not always and not for just anything. Do you?

    I know that in Christianity, forgiveness by God is a big thing, but I am not aware of much teaching regarding forgiving others. Jesus' message is about love of which forgiveness is be a part but I cannot recall any verses where he specifically talks of forgiveness. Can you suggest some?
  15. Standard memberyo its me
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    03 Sep '11 19:49
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Forgiveness by whom and to whom?
    From one person to another- or to a group of people.

    I know that in Christianity, forgiveness by God is a big thing, but I am not aware of much teaching regarding forgiving others. Jesus' message is about love of which forgiveness is be a part but I cannot recall any verses where he specifically talks of forgiveness. Can you suggest some?
    ? You must have heard the Lords prayer??
    a refrence;

    "For if you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive men their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins."

    Matthew 6:14-15 New International Version

    Yes, I personally do forgive people, but not always and not for just anything. Do you?

    I do forgive, yes. For me forgiving is about understanding the reasons behind what happened and acepting what accured and then letting it go.

    The reason I was asking was becasue I've been talking with someone about the idea of depression being caused by a person not having dealt with an incident in their past. The idea (which I'm not sure if I agree with or not, still thinking) is that when an incident happens in someones life they either hold on to it, by not dealing with it ie not forgiveness. Or they look at what happened, understand and forgive. The consequences of the first is that when another stressful situation happens, perhaps a few years later, the person can not deal with it, none of their coping mecanisimis work and they become depressed. Also the idea that a part of them stays the age they were when the incident happened. it's an intersting idea, and got me thinking what about people who simply don't acept the idea that forgivness is neccessary.
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