1. Standard memberRJHinds
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    24 Jun '12 05:13
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=fvwp&NR=1&v=gC3NXOFT9no

    The Sumerian God here appears to be the same as the Hebrew God.
    I think the Holy Bible refers to the sumerians as Samaitans.
    Jesus thinks they are worshipping the same God as the Jews.

    HalleluYah !!! Praise the Lord!
  2. SubscriberSuzianne
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    24 Jun '12 13:22
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=fvwp&NR=1&v=gC3NXOFT9no

    The Sumerian God here appears to be the same as the Hebrew God.
    I think the Holy Bible refers to the sumerians as Samaitans.
    Jesus thinks they are worshipping the same God as the Jews.

    HalleluYah !!! Praise the Lord!
    Exactly which Sumerian god are you talking about??

    I wouldn't exactly be so quick to equate the monotheistic religion of the Hebrews with the polytheistic religion of the Sumerians.

    The Samaritans, on the other hand, were merely citizens of Samaria, which was the capital of the Kingdom of Israel during the reign of Omri. So yeah, I guess they were Hebrew. But they weren't Sumerians.

    You really should make an effort to know what you are talking about before you post.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    24 Jun '12 13:45
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Exactly which Sumerian god are you talking about??

    I wouldn't exactly be so quick to equate the monotheistic religion of the Hebrews with the polytheistic religion of the Sumerians.

    The Samaritans, on the other hand, were merely citizens of Samaria, which was the capital of the Kingdom of Israel during the reign of Omri. So yeah, I guess they were He ...[text shortened]... rians.

    You really should make an effort to know what you are talking about before you post.
    Well I didn't like the so-called music score, and the actual words needs editing, containing a lot of grammatical errors and the jumpiness of the words was very distracting. All in all a sucky presentation.

    But the basic idea may still be correct. Judaism is just paved over Sumarian theology. That particular version of Sumar theology.
  4. Standard memberRJHinds
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    24 Jun '12 16:03
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Exactly which Sumerian god are you talking about??

    I wouldn't exactly be so quick to equate the monotheistic religion of the Hebrews with the polytheistic religion of the Sumerians.

    The Samaritans, on the other hand, were merely citizens of Samaria, which was the capital of the Kingdom of Israel during the reign of Omri. So yeah, I guess they were He ...[text shortened]... rians.

    You really should make an effort to know what you are talking about before you post.
    I am just posting my opinion at this time. I did not say I knew for a fact that the Sumerians were the same as the Samaritans. But it appears that the names are similiar, the beliefs are similiar, and I know of no other people at that time of Jesus that we could call Sumerians with those same beliefs. Do you?
  5. Joined
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    25 Jun '12 01:13
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Exactly which Sumerian god are you talking about??

    I wouldn't exactly be so quick to equate the monotheistic religion of the Hebrews with the polytheistic religion of the Sumerians.

    The Samaritans, on the other hand, were merely citizens of Samaria, which was the capital of the Kingdom of Israel during the reign of Omri. So yeah, I guess they were He ...[text shortened]... rians.

    You really should make an effort to know what you are talking about before you post.
    the religion of the hebrews was not monotheistic. they picked up on the monotheism idea much later in their history (post babylonian exile), with the invention of judesim.

    the hebrews themselves viewed their tribal deity (the ones who actually accepted the tribal deity of the levites. many of them worshiped other local gods) much as the sumerians did their chief god.

    Psa 82:1 God standeth in the congregation of the mighty; he judgeth among the gods.

    the idea presented in the early bible is that of a chief god, or a god more powerful than the other gods.
  6. Standard memberRJHinds
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    25 Jun '12 01:33
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    the religion of the hebrews was not monotheistic. they picked up on the monotheism idea much later in their history (post babylonian exile), with the invention of judesim.

    the hebrews themselves viewed their tribal deity (the ones who actually accepted the tribal deity of the levites. many of them worshiped other local gods) much as the sumerians did ...[text shortened]... presented in the early bible is that of a chief god, or a god more powerful than the other gods.
    I think you have been listening to a false teacher.
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    25 Jun '12 06:32
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I think you have been listening to a false teacher.
    history is not a false teacher.
  8. Standard memberRJHinds
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    25 Jun '12 07:25
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    history is not a false teacher.
    The Holy Bible is history.
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    25 Jun '12 09:15
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    The Holy Bible is history.
    True. But it's not a book about history.
  10. SubscriberSuzianne
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    25 Jun '12 12:15
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    the religion of the hebrews was not monotheistic. they picked up on the monotheism idea much later in their history (post babylonian exile), with the invention of judesim.

    the hebrews themselves viewed their tribal deity (the ones who actually accepted the tribal deity of the levites. many of them worshiped other local gods) much as the sumerians did ...[text shortened]... presented in the early bible is that of a chief god, or a god more powerful than the other gods.
    You may try to present the Hebrews as being polytheistic all you want. Certainly don't let any facts get in your way.

    Of course the Hebrews were monotheistic. This is documented all the way back to Abraham, and certainly by the time of Moses (you could see this in Exodus and the first commandment of the Ten Commandments). This was long before the Babylonian exile.
  11. SubscriberSuzianne
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    25 Jun '12 12:401 edit
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I am just posting my opinion at this time. I did not say I knew for a fact that the Sumerians were the same as the Samaritans. But it appears that the names are similiar, the beliefs are similiar, and I know of no other people at that time of Jesus that we could call Sumerians with those same beliefs. Do you?
    Of course there were no people at the time of Jesus we could call the Sumerians, because the Sumerians were all gone by the time of the rise of the Babylonians over 1500 years prior to the time of Jesus.

    The Sumerians were from Sumer, a land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Mesopotamia, and the Samaritans were from Samaria, in the Northern Kingdom of Israel. There is NO connection.
  12. Standard memberRJHinds
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    25 Jun '12 14:502 edits
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Of course there were no people at the time of Jesus we could call the Sumerians, because the Sumerians were all gone by the time of the rise of the Babylonians over 1500 years prior to the time of Jesus.

    The Sumerians were from Sumer, a land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Mesopotamia, and the Samaritans were from Samaria, in the Northern Kingdom of Israel. There is NO connection.
    The following is part of what wikipedia writes about the Samaitans.

    Ancestrally, Samaritans claim descent from a group of Israelite inhabitants from the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh (the two sons of Joseph) as well as some descendants from the priestly tribe of Levi, who have connections to ancient Samaria from the period of their entry into the land of Canaan, while some suggest that it was from the beginning of the Babylonian Exile up to the Samaritan Kingdom of Baba Rabba. The Samaritans, however, derive their name not from this geographical designation, but rather from the Hebrew term Shamerim, "Keepers [of the Law]".

    In the Talmud, a central post-exilic religious text of Judaism, Samaritan claim of ancestral origin is disputed, and in those texts they are called Cutheans (Hebrew: Kuthim), allegedly from the ancient city of Cuthah (Kutha), geographically located in what is today Iraq. Modern genetics has suggested some truth to both the claims of the Samaritans and the mainstream Jewish accounts in the Talmud.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samaritans

    Sumer (from Akkadian Šumeru; Sumerian, approximately "land of the civilized lords" or "native land" was a civilization and historical region in southern Mesopotamia, modern Iraq during the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumer

    Kutha, Cuthah, or Cutha (Sumerian: Gudua, modern Tell Ibrahim, Babil Governorate, Iraq) was an ancient city of Sumer on the right bank of the eastern branch of the Upper Euphrates, north of Nippur and around 25 miles northeast of Babylon.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kutha

    It appears to me there still could be a connection between the ancient Sumerians of Iraq and the Samaritans, who may have come from Iraq.
  13. Cape Town
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    25 Jun '12 14:511 edit
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    This is documented all the way back to Abraham, and certainly by the time of Moses .
    Of course it needs to be qualified that what you mean by 'documented' is 'recorded in the Bible'. Yet most non-Christian scholars would agree that the parts of the Bible in question are not historically accurate. (hint: neither Abraham nor Moses are actual historical figures).
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    25 Jun '12 17:33
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    You may try to present the Hebrews as being polytheistic all you want. Certainly don't let any facts get in your way.
    let's examine not letting the facts get in my way, using only the bible. this will be a mini bible lesson for you.

    what did moses discover when he came down from the mountain?
    in isaiah 26:13-14, what is isaiah referring to when he says "other lords?"
    in 2 kings 23:5; who appointed the priests and to whom were the they burning incense?
    in ezekiel 8:14; to whom was the woman weeping?

    there are many more examples, but these will be sufficient to get you started on the path of knowledge.
  15. Joined
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    25 Jun '12 17:37
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    The Holy Bible is history.
    it's a book of myths and legends that sometimes pretends to be a history. there is some accuracy in it that can be verified.
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