1. SubscriberFMF
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    28 Nov '14 00:18
    What sorts of conditions or assurances would be necessary or sufficient to make it worthwhile to consume an elixir of immortality?

    I nominate CalJust! You don't have to accept of course... any discussion that may ensue... may ensue regardless.
  2. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    28 Nov '14 00:36
    Originally posted by FMF
    [b]What sorts of conditions or assurances would be necessary or sufficient to make it worthwhile to consume an elixir of immortality?

    I nominate CalJust! You don't have to accept of course... any discussion that may ensue... may ensue regardless.[/b]
    I've seem most atheists on here come down against immortality but I for one would be tempted!

    I think the usual argument against is the boredom/lonliness and eventual madness.

    So my conditions would be;
    1. Physical and mental good health for myself and all other immortals.
    2. An infinite supply of artistic materials.
    3. An everlasting deck of cards.
    3. My wife.

    I don't subscribe to the view that death gives life meaning.
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    28 Nov '14 00:48
    Originally posted by FMF
    [b]What sorts of conditions or assurances would be necessary or sufficient to make it worthwhile to consume an elixir of immortality?

    I nominate CalJust! You don't have to accept of course... any discussion that may ensue... may ensue regardless.[/b]
    Necessary and sufficient...

    Net happiness

    And

    Knowing there will be net happiness
  4. SubscriberFMF
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    28 Nov '14 00:55
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    I don't subscribe to the view that death gives life meaning.
    I think I do. I think the finite opportunity that life offers creates a meaning and significance to each day that immortality would obliterate.

    Therefore I reckon starting from scratch at periodic intervals [or being able to] ~ much like reincarnation, I suppose ~ would be a condition or assurance that would be necessary to make it worthwhile to consume the elixir.

    However, this would rob me of the unique narrative ~ the collection of memories, interactions etc. ~ that differentiates us all from each other and forms our individuality. This would not be desirable.

    If there were some kind of unique soul that created a common thread of some kind through the eternity of fresh starts, it might work.

    But, all in all, I think I would turn down the elixir.
  5. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    28 Nov '14 01:15
    Originally posted by FMF
    I think I do. I think the finite opportunity that life offers creates a meaning and significance to each day that immortality would obliterate.

    Therefore I reckon starting from scratch at periodic intervals [or being able to] ~ much like reincarnation, I suppose ~ would be a condition or assurance that would be necessary to make it worthwhile to consume the ...[text shortened]... rnity of fresh starts, it might work.

    But, all in all, I think I would turn down the elixir.
    about just an extra 50 years? 500? 5,000?
  6. SubscriberFMF
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    28 Nov '14 01:23
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    about just an extra 50 years? 500? 5,000?
    I wouldn't want to live to see my children die. I can process my own inevitable death and that of my spouse and the generation that gave birth to us ~ and I can even deal with the death of my contemporaries ~ but I think the hardest instance of death to come to terms with is that of your own children.
  7. Standard memberDeepThought
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    28 Nov '14 02:182 edits
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    I've seem most atheists on here come down against immortality but I for one would be tempted!

    I think the usual argument against is the boredom/lonliness and eventual madness.

    So my conditions would be;
    1. Physical and mental good health for myself and all other immortals.
    2. An infinite supply of artistic materials.
    3. An everlasting deck of cards.
    3. My wife.

    I don't subscribe to the view that death gives life meaning.
    Yes, I think that people say that because they want some kind of explanation for why they are going to die and find their own reason. Does this elixir make me conditionally immortal or unconditionally immortal? In a billion years or so it's going to get hot around here. What happens come the heat death of the universe/big rip or whatever happens.
  8. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    28 Nov '14 02:31
    Originally posted by FMF
    I wouldn't want to live to see my children die. I can process my own inevitable death and that of my spouse and the generation that gave birth to us ~ and I can even deal with the death of my contemporaries ~ but I think the hardest instance of death to come to terms with is that of your own children.
    My own daughter died in my arms and I know others with similar
    stories. Life goes on. Inevitably immortality would mean saying
    goodbye to friends and relatives again and again. It would be hard
    but not a deal breaker.

    Perhaps your caveat on immortality would be the same for friends and family?
  9. SubscriberFMF
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    28 Nov '14 02:32
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Perhaps your caveat on immortality would be the same for friends and family?
    Which caveat?
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    28 Nov '14 05:18
    Originally posted by FMF
    What sorts of conditions or assurances would be necessary or sufficient to make it worthwhile to consume an elixir of immortality?
    I would need to be convinced that it works reasonably well. Other than that I probably wouldn't ask too many questions.
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    28 Nov '14 05:23
    Originally posted by FMF
    I wouldn't want to live to see my children die. I can process my own inevitable death and that of my spouse and the generation that gave birth to us ~ and I can even deal with the death of my contemporaries ~ but I think the hardest instance of death to come to terms with is that of your own children.
    So, if one of your children gets a terminal illness, are you going to commit suicide in order to avoid witnessing your child's death?
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    28 Nov '14 05:29
    Originally posted by FMF
    Therefore I reckon starting from scratch at periodic intervals [or being able to] ~ much like reincarnation, I suppose ~ would be a condition or assurance that would be necessary to make it worthwhile to consume the elixir.

    However, this would rob me of the unique narrative ~ the collection of memories, interactions etc. ~ that differentiates us all from each other and forms our individuality. This would not be desirable.
    I have already been reincarnated several times, and it isn't a problem for me. I do not recall anything about myself at age 2. I do not recall more than one or two images from my life before age 7. I recall a little more from my teens, but really not that much.
    I consider myself a different person than I was as a young adult.
    If someone offered me an extra 100 years to live, I would take it without hesitation. I have already had a long life, and at times a hard life, but I have not yet decided to end it because it was either to difficult, too boring, not unique enough or any other reason.
  13. SubscriberFMF
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    28 Nov '14 05:36
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    So, if one of your children gets a terminal illness, are you going to commit suicide in order to avoid witnessing your child's death?
    Suicide? No. Why do you ask?
  14. SubscriberFMF
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    28 Nov '14 05:39
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    If someone offered me an extra 100 years to live, I would take it without hesitation.
    I have no particular problem with the expected duration of life that I have. If it turns out to be longer than expected that's also fine.
  15. Cape Town
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    28 Nov '14 06:161 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    Suicide? No. Why do you ask?
    Because you said you would not choose to stop your death if it meant outliving your children. (or so I understood it).
    So lets put it this way. Suppose your child has a terminal illness and will die in a year. You have a terminal illness and will die in 6 months. You can take a pill that will cure your illness. Do you take the pill?
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