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  1. Subscriber joesheppe
    Lesser Poobah
    01 Nov '11 06:38
    Folks,
    I was just watching a JRobi video on Youtube, and my ears went dead when he pronounced Najdorf as Nahjdorf. It is not that!
    It is correctly pronounced Nidorf, with a long i or eye sound. N eye dorf. A more pleasing sound, anyway.
    While we're at it. Alekhine is pronounced by Russians as Al eck in. There is no long i in that.
    Keres, I believe, is supposed to sound like Keresh. Those in the know say Petroseon, not Petrozhin.
    Smyslov is best Smiz lov.
    I once heard Bronstein pronounced as Bronshtain.
    Paco Vallejo is, in Spain pronounced like Paco Vahyechho as if saying yechh

    Of course the Frenchman Bacrot is like Bacrow' with the accent on the last syllable.
    Vlad Kramnik's last name is properly pronounced like Krawmnick.
    Jakovenko as Yaakovenko
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the Dutchman Anish Giri is said as Awnish Geeree.
    Dreev is Dree ev. There are more than a few of those double e names around.
    Vassily Ivanchuk? like Va silly Evonshewk.
    Again I believe Armenians like to pronounce Aronian as Aroneon.
    Carlsen is, I think, Carlsen.
    heh.
  2. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    01 Nov '11 07:24
    Vallejo is pronounced valyay co - phonetically 'vaˈleɪjəʊ'

    double 'L' in Spanish is normally pronounced with an English 'ly' sound.

    To get the 'jəʊ' sound you need phlegm in the back of your throat, because it isn't a hard 'c' as in 'duck', but is a soft j and o (as in hole) rolled together with the 'j' starting hard and slurring into the 'o' from the back of the palate. 😉

    -m.
  3. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    01 Nov '11 12:46
    When Aronian's play is flawed then it's pronounced Erronian.
  4. Subscriber joesheppe
    Lesser Poobah
    01 Nov '11 16:06
    Hah. Who writes your material, kl? 😉
  5. 01 Nov '11 19:52
    Originally posted by joesheppe
    ... Keres, I believe, is supposed to sound like Keresh. ...
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the Dutchman Anish Giri is said as Awnish Geeree. ...
    I don't know how a native speaker of Estonian would pronounce 'Keres'.
    (Estonian is one of the few non-Indo-European languages in Europe.)

    When Anish Giri was born in Russia and given his name by his parents
    (father Sanjay, who's Nepalese, and mother Olga, who's Russian), I doubt
    that they knew or cared about how Dutch people would pronounce it.
  6. 01 Nov '11 20:15
    Originally posted by mikelom
    Vallejo is pronounced valyay co - phonetically 'vaˈleɪjəʊ'

    double 'L' in Spanish is normally pronounced with an English 'ly' sound.

    To get the 'jəʊ' sound you need phlegm in the back of your throat, because it isn't a hard 'c' as in 'duck', but is a soft j and o (as in hole) rolled together with the 'j' starting hard and slurring into the 'o' from the back of the palate. 😉

    -m.
    Double L in Spanish is an English e.
  7. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    01 Nov '11 20:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Trev33
    Double L in Spanish is an English e.
    The 'e' has an 'L' before it.

    You speak too much Portugese.

    Wan't a war about it? 😀

    -m.

    Edit: Valley-aycho good enough ? 😉
  8. 01 Nov '11 20:44
    Originally posted by Trev33
    Double L in Spanish is an English e.
    ll in spanish = y in english.

    llamas = yamas
  9. 01 Nov '11 20:47
    Originally posted by mikelom
    Vallejo is pronounced valyay co - phonetically 'vaˈleɪjəʊ'

    double 'L' in Spanish is normally pronounced with an English 'ly' sound.

    To get the 'jəʊ' sound you need phlegm in the back of your throat, because it isn't a hard 'c' as in 'duck', but is a soft j and o (as in hole) rolled together with the 'j' starting hard and slurring into the 'o' from the back of the palate. 😉

    -m.
    This is not pronounced valyayco - rather va yay ho
  10. 01 Nov '11 21:41
    Originally posted by UnderPromote
    ll in spanish = y in english.

    llamas = yamas
    Sevilla

    Saveea.
  11. Standard member atticus2
    Frustrate the Bad
    01 Nov '11 22:49 / 2 edits
    An essential tip with Russian names is to roll the R's.

    So, it's Karrrr-poff (Karpov); and Korrrr-chnoi (Korchnoi); and Kas-PARRRR-off

    For Baltic state languages, 's' is often 'sh'. So Saranas Sulskis is pronounced 'Sharunash Shulshkish'. Best drink several pints of beer first, then you'll get it right 🙂

    Topalov is 'To-PAH-loff'

    Anand is 'an-AND'

    And the President of FIDE, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov is pronounced 'Kirrr-RYST Ima-FUKKIN-frootloop'
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    01 Nov '11 23:25
    Originally posted by joesheppe
    Folks,
    I was just watching a JRobi video on Youtube, and my ears went dead when he pronounced Najdorf as Nahjdorf. It is not that!
    It is correctly pronounced Nidorf, with a long i or eye sound. N eye dorf. A more pleasing sound, anyway.
    While we're at it. Alekhine is pronounced by Russians as Al eck in. There is no long i in that.
    Keres, I believe, i ...[text shortened]... elieve Armenians like to pronounce Aronian as Aroneon.
    Carlsen is, I think, Carlsen.
    heh.
    I learned from this. Thanks and thumbs up!
  13. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    01 Nov '11 23:39
    Originally posted by joesheppe
    Hah. Who writes your material, kl? 😉
    Zombies!
  14. 01 Nov '11 23:41 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by atticus2
    ...For Baltic state languages, 's' is often 'sh'....
    Please don't lump all 'Baltic state languages' together.
    Estonian's much more closely related to Finnish than to Latvian or Lithuanian.
    To imply that, on account of geographical promixity, Estonian must be close to
    Latvian or Lithuanian is like implying that Basque must be close to Spanish.
  15. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    02 Nov '11 00:15
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Please don't lump all 'Baltic state languages' together.
    Estonian's much more closely related to Finnish than to Latvian or Lithuanian.
    To imply that, on account of geographical promixity, Estonian must be close to
    Latvian or Lithuanian is like implying that Basque must be close to Spanish.
    he didn't speak of finnic languages as far as I can see, only baltic.