1. Joined
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    16 Nov '06 15:56
    if christians are 100% certain that they're belief is the right one and god is a christian god, would that be implying that every other religion is wrong, and so offended two thirds of the world's population?
  2. Standard membergenius
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    16 Nov '06 16:01
    Originally posted by rooktakesqueen
    if christians are 100% certain that they're belief is the right one and god is a christian god, would that be implying that every other religion is wrong, and so offended two thirds of the world's population?
    yup 🙂
  3. London
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    16 Nov '06 16:03
    Originally posted by rooktakesqueen
    if christians are 100% certain that they're belief is the right one and god is a christian god, would that be implying that every other religion is wrong
    In so far as they differ from Christianity, yes.

    But, hey - every religion makes the same claim (even the ones that claim they don't).
  4. Donationrwingett
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    16 Nov '06 16:04
    Originally posted by rooktakesqueen
    if christians are 100% certain that they're belief is the right one and god is a christian god, would that be implying that every other religion is wrong, and so offended two thirds of the world's population?
    Even as an atheist, it makes no difference to me whether christians claim their god is the 'right' one or not. In and of itself, it does no one any harm to indulge them in that little fantasy. What offends me is when they try to force that belief on everyone around them, or try to claim some special privelege for their belief.
  5. Standard membergenius
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    16 Nov '06 16:071 edit
    Originally posted by rwingett
    What offends me is when they...try to claim some special privelege for their belief.
    by this do you mean christians saying "only Christians shall go to heaven", or "Christianity is the only true religion because...", or something else completly?
  6. Donationrwingett
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    16 Nov '06 16:16
    Originally posted by genius
    by this do you mean christians saying "only Christians shall go to heaven", or "Christianity is the only true religion because...", or something else completly?
    I don't care what christians say, I only care about what they do. If they say that only christians go to heaven, it makes no difference to me. I think it's absurd, but it does me no harm for them to say it. But if they try to enact legislation to support that belief, then that is where I take offense.
  7. London
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    16 Nov '06 16:19
    Originally posted by rwingett
    I don't care what christians say, I only care about what they do. If they say that only christians go to heaven, it makes no difference to me. I think it's absurd, but it does me no harm for them to say it. But if they try to enact legislation to support that belief, then that is where I take offense.
    How do you enact legislation to say that only Christians will go to heaven?
  8. Donationrwingett
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    16 Nov '06 16:272 edits
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    How do you enact legislation to say that only Christians will go to heaven?
    I am opposed. The state has no business dictating theological matters, or giving special preference to any religious group. And the churches have no business enacting legislation through the state. A church can maintain, as part of their dogma, that only christians will go to heaven, but that's as far as it goes. Adherance to that dogma must come through free association and not through enforced legislation. The wall of separation between church and state is, ultimately, to the benefit of both.

    Edit: I misread your question. I am, of course, referring to legislation to enforce any theological dogma, and not just the example in question. As for how, exactly, one would enact such legislation, I don't know. But I'd be against it.
  9. London
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    16 Nov '06 16:321 edit
    Originally posted by rwingett
    I am opposed. The state has no business dictating theological matters, or giving special preference to any religious group. And the churches have no business enacting legislation through the state. A church can maintain, as part of their dogma, that only christians will go to heaven, but that's as far as it goes. Adherance to that dogma must come through fr ...[text shortened]... lation. The wall of separation between church and state is, ultimately, to the benefit of both.
    Let me make myself clearer -- what's the point of a law passed by the legislature that states that only Christians would go to heaven? How would they impliment/enforce it?

    EDIT: Just saw your edit. But, once again, what theological dogma can a State pass into law? How, for instance, would a State make a law stating that God is Triune? What would the point be?

    So we have to presume you're talking about social laws based on religious doctrines. Certainly one can understand the undesirability of laws that require people to go to church on Sundays, for instance. But what about laws prohibiting murder? Or theft?
  10. Donationrwingett
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    16 Nov '06 16:36
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    Let me make myself clearer -- what's the point of a law passed by the legislature that states that only Christians would go to heaven? How would they impliment/enforce it?
    They obviously couldn't enforce it, you nitwit, but they could take the profession of that belief as a religious test for office.
  11. London
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    16 Nov '06 16:38
    Originally posted by rwingett
    They obviously couldn't enforce it, you nitwit, but they could take the profession of that belief as a religious test for office.
    Would you say that disavowal of that belief could be an equally religious test for office?
  12. Donationrwingett
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    16 Nov '06 16:51
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    Would you say that disavowal of that belief could be an equally religious test for office?
    No. You aren't required to disavow it to hold public office. In fact, a majority of officeholders in this country are christians who believe just that. Your belief on the matter is irrelevant to holding public office.
  13. London
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    16 Nov '06 16:52
    Originally posted by rwingett
    No. You aren't required to disavow it to hold public office. In fact, a majority of officeholders in this country are christians who believe just that. Your belief on the matter is irrelevant to holding public office.
    What about belief on other matters? Say, the sinfulness of homosexual activity?
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    16 Nov '06 17:08
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    What about belief on other matters? Say, the sinfulness of homosexual activity?
    Homosexual activity has support from both Christians and those at the other end of the equation. Kind of Ironic how the devil and god support the dis-approval of this.
  15. Donationrwingett
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    16 Nov '06 17:09
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    What about belief on other matters? Say, the sinfulness of homosexual activity?
    You're free to believe it.
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