1. Joined
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    24 Jul '08 18:19
    some people told me buddism is a cult of worship,i dont know what ther talking about.
    iam going home to tend my shrine!!!😏😏
  2. Gangster Land
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    24 Jul '08 18:331 edit
    Originally posted by jackjones
    some people told me buddism is a cult of worship,i dont know what ther talking about.
    iam going home to tend my shrine!!!😏😏
    I'm fairly sure a "buddist" would have something to do with horticulture...no cults, of worship or otherwise.
  3. Standard memberScriabin
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    24 Jul '08 21:15
    Originally posted by TheSkipper
    I'm fairly sure a "buddist" would have something to do with horticulture...no cults, of worship or otherwise.
    Buddhism is not a religion in the sense in which that word is commonly understood, for it is not "a system of faith and worship owing allegiance to a supernatural being."

    Buddhism does not demand blind faith from its adherents. Here mere belief is dethroned and is substituted by confidence based on knowledge. The confidence placed by a follower on the Buddha is like that of a sick person in a noted physician, or a student in his teacher. A Buddhist seeks refuge in the Buddha because it was he who discovered what Buddhist call the Path of Deliverance.

    A Buddhist does not seek refuge in the Buddha with the hope that he will be saved by his personal purification. The Buddha gives no such guarantee. It is not within the power of a Buddha to wash away the impurities of others. One could neither purify nor defile another.

    The Buddha, as Teacher, instructs us, but we ourselves are directly responsible for our purification.

    Although a Buddhist seeks refuge in the Buddha, he does not make any self-surrender. Nor does a Buddhist sacrifice his freedom of thought by becoming a follower of the Buddha. He can exercise his own free will and develop his knowledge even to the extent of becoming a Buddha himself.

    The starting point of Buddhism is reasoning or understanding.

    To the seekers of truth the Buddha says:

    "Do not accept anything on (mere) hearsay -- (i.e., thinking that thus have we heard it from a long time). Do not accept anything by mere tradition -- (i.e., thinking that it has thus been handed down through many generations). Do not accept anything on account of mere rumors -- (i.e., by believing what others say without any investigation). Do not accept anything just because it accords with your scriptures. Do not accept anything by mere suppositions. Do not accept anything by mere inference. Do not accept anything by merely considering the reasons. Do not accept anything merely because it agrees with your pre-conceived notions. Do not accept anything merely because it seems acceptable -- (i.e., thinking that as the speaker seems to be a good person his words should be accepted). Do not accept anything thinking that the ascetic is respected by us (therefore it is right to accept his word).

    "But when you know for yourselves -- these things are immoral, these things are blameworthy, these things are censured by the wise, these things, when performed and undertaken conduce to ruin and sorrow -- then indeed do you reject them.

    "When you know for yourselves -- these things are moral, these things are blameless, these things are praised by the wise, these things, when performed and undertaken, conduce to well-being and happiness -- then do you live acting accordingly."

    Though there is no blind faith, one might argue whether there is no worshiping of images etc., in Buddhism.

    Buddhists do not worship an image expecting worldly or spiritual favors, but pay their reverence to what it represents.

    An understanding Buddhist, in offering flowers and incense to an image, designedly makes himself feel that he is in the presence of the living Buddha and thereby gains inspiration. He tries to follow the Buddha's example.

    The Bo-tree is also a symbol of what Buddhists believe is Enlightenment. Buddhists say these external objects of reverence are not absolutely necessary, but they are useful as they tend to concentrate one's attention. An intellectual person could dispense with them as he could easily focus his attention and visualize the Buddha.

    For our own good, and out of gratitude, Buddhists pay such external respect but what the Buddha expects from his disciple is not so much obeisance as the actual observance of his teachings. The Buddha says -- "He honors me best who practices my teaching best."

    There are no petitional or intercessory prayers in Buddhism. However much we may pray to the Buddha we cannot be saved. The Buddha does not grant favors to those who pray to him. Instead of petitional prayers there is meditation that leads to self-control, purification and enlightenment. Meditation is neither a silent reverie nor keeping the mind blank. It is an active striving. It serves as a tonic both to the heart and the mind. The Buddha not only speaks of the futility of offering prayers but also disparages a slave mentality. A Buddhist should not pray to be saved, but should rely on himself and win his freedom.

    In Buddhism there is not, as in most other religions, an Almighty God to be obeyed and feared. The Buddha does not believe in a cosmic potentate, omniscient and omnipresent. In Buddhism there are no divine revelations or divine messengers. A Buddhist is, therefore, not subservient to any higher supernatural power which controls his destiny and which arbitrarily rewards and punishes. Since Buddhists do not believe in revelations of a divine being Buddhism does not claim the monopoly of truth and does not condemn any other religion. But Buddhism recognizes the infinite latent possibilities of man and teaches that man can gain deliverance from suffering by his own efforts independent of divine help or mediating priests.

    Buddhism cannot, therefore, strictly be called a religion because it is neither a system of faith and worship, nor "the outward act or form by which men indicate their recognition of the existence of a God or gods having power over their own destiny to whom obedience, service, and honor are due."

    If, by religion, is meant "a teaching which takes a view of life that is more than superficial, a teaching which looks into life and not merely at it, a teaching which furnishes men with a guide to conduct that is in accord with a teaching which enables those who give it heed to face life with fortitude and death with serenity," or a system to get rid of the ills of life, then it is certainly a religion of religions.
  4. Standard memberSwissGambit
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    25 Jul '08 22:09
    Originally posted by Scriabin
    Buddhism is not a religion in the sense in which that word is commonly understood, for it is not "a system of faith and worship owing allegiance to a supernatural being."

    Buddhism does not demand blind faith from its adherents. Here mere belief is dethroned and is substituted by confidence based on knowledge. The confidence placed by a follower on the Bu ...[text shortened]... stem to get rid of the ills of life, then it is certainly a religion of religions.
    Source...?
  5. Standard memberScriabin
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    26 Jul '08 20:531 edit
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    Source...?
    Well, a lot of different ones, actually. Why not look at these:

    My favorite is an easy read and free on the net:
    Mindfulness in Plain English
    http://www.vipassana.com/meditation/mindfulness_in_plain_english.php

    or try these:

    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/bullitt/theravada.html
    http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/5minbud.htm
    http://www.beyondthenet.net/dhamma/what_is_buddhism.htm
    http://fwbo.org/buddhism.html
    http://www.mahidol.ac.th/budsir/buddhism.htm
  6. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    15 Jun '09 15:02
    Originally posted by Scriabin
    Buddhism is not a religion in the sense in which that word is commonly understood, for it is not "a system of faith and worship owing allegiance to a supernatural being."

    Buddhism does not demand blind faith from its adherents. Here mere belief is dethroned and is substituted by confidence based on knowledge. The confidence placed by a follower on the Bu ...[text shortened]... stem to get rid of the ills of life, then it is certainly a religion of religions.
    this is nice...
    (very anti-fundamentalist)
  7. Joined
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    15 Jun '09 17:254 edits
    Judging from Scriabin's biased article I suppose that he thinks it is impossible for an evangelical Christian to understand Buddhist thought.

    Well I am a Christian. I don't know what in the world he means by "blind faith". But anyway, without consulting with any writing what so ever, I will give my off the cuff understanding of Buddhism:

    Buddhism is a philosophy. It could be called a religion but not in the sense of a theistic one.

    The main idea of it is that all the negative circumstances of human life are due to human desire. These desires are longings for something illusionary. The world as seen by longing and suffering humans is not real. Human life of unhappiness is due to a longing after what is an illusion.

    The answer to this unhappiness is to seek through eventual enlightenment as state of oneness with the universe such that the ego is subsummed up into a great cosmic oversoul of unity of all things. This state is called Nirvana.

    Buddhist have various disciplines of meditation to achieve this freedom from suffering and obsorption of the human ego up into Nirvana.

    The Buddha was a pioneer who made it. Others, in principle, should be able to follow. Most however, who are excellent Buddhist will spend their lives on a noble attempt to achieve Nirvana. In the search for it, as a by product of the philosophy, they will gain some wisdom which helps people along the way. Most basically helping them to realize that the world they are lusting after is illusionary.

    No articles or books have been consulted. And I may be mistaken. But this is what I remember about Buddhism. I found it very attractive roughly between the ages of 19 and 22.

    I don't think there is a God of sorts in classic Buddhism. There is instead a great Cosmic Oversoul, a grand Mind of sorts to be made one with. And peace is the result.
  8. Standard memberScriabin
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    15 Jun '09 19:46
    Originally posted by jaywill
    Judging from Scriabin's biased article I suppose that he thinks it is impossible for an evangelical Christian to understand Buddhist thought.

    Well I am a Christian. I don't know what in the world he means by "blind faith". But anyway, without consulting with any writing what so ever, I will give my off the cuff understanding of Buddhism:

    Buddhism is ...[text shortened]... great Cosmic Oversoul, a grand Mind of sorts to be made one with. And peace is the result.
    this guy must be blonde ...

    and he needs real thick lenses or a plate glass window in his navel just to see where he's going ...

    what a lot of stereotypical crap ...

    why, I've seen the Dalai Lama himself on the streets of Washington DC achieve Nirvana just by ordering a hot dog from a street vendor.

    But you must know that one ...
  9. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Jun '09 19:52
    Originally posted by TheSkipper
    I'm fairly sure a "buddist" would have something to do with horticulture...no cults, of worship or otherwise.
    Dude. We worship the buds.
  10. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Jun '09 19:56
    Originally posted by jaywill
    Judging from Scriabin's biased article I suppose that he thinks it is impossible for an evangelical Christian to understand Buddhist thought.

    Well I am a Christian. I don't know what in the world he means by "blind faith". But anyway, without consulting with any writing what so ever, I will give my off the cuff understanding of Buddhism:

    Buddhism is ...[text shortened]... great Cosmic Oversoul, a grand Mind of sorts to be made one with. And peace is the result.
    Wow. Did you write that? It seems of higher quality than I thought you capable of. Sorry for the insult, but it comes with a compliment. 😀
  11. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Jun '09 19:58
    Originally posted by Scriabin
    this guy must be blonde ...

    and he needs real thick lenses or a plate glass window in his navel just to see where he's going ...

    what a lot of stereotypical crap ...

    why, I've seen the Dalai Lama himself on the streets of Washington DC achieve Nirvana just by ordering a hot dog from a street vendor.

    But you must know that one ...
    I saw him once. I was an usher for him when he gave a speech at a Jewish temple on Wilshire. I couldn't hear him though. He was far away and unamplified I think.
  12. Joined
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    15 Jun '09 21:541 edit
    Originally posted by Scriabin
    this guy must be blonde ...

    and he needs real thick lenses or a plate glass window in his navel just to see where he's going ...

    what a lot of stereotypical crap ...

    why, I've seen the Dalai Lama himself on the streets of Washington DC achieve Nirvana just by ordering a hot dog from a street vendor.

    But you must know that one ...
    =========================
    this guy must be blonde ...

    and he needs real thick lenses or a plate glass window in his navel just to see where he's going ...

    what a lot of stereotypical crap ...

    why, I've seen the Dalai Lama himself on the streets of Washington DC achieve Nirvana just by ordering a hot dog from a street vendor.

    But you must know that one ...
    ==========================


    Oh stereotypical crap huh?

    As if your bigoted anti Christian "blind faith" propoganda wasn't stereotypical crap.

    I know the joke about the hot dog vendor. It's almost as funny as your complaint of my little unrehearsed blurb on Buddhism.

    Care to point out what I said was wrong ??

    Maybe you didn't like me using the Western term "Oversoul". Is that your beef ?
  13. Joined
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    15 Jun '09 21:582 edits
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Wow. Did you write that? It seems of higher quality than I thought you capable of. Sorry for the insult, but it comes with a compliment. 😀
    Its no big deal.

    Sorry, Buddhism is not SOOOO esoteric that its basic tenets can't be grasped by any reasonably curious and educated adult.
  14. Joined
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    15 Jun '09 22:183 edits
    Originally posted by Scriabin
    Buddhism is not a religion in the sense in which that word is commonly understood, for it is not "a system of faith and worship owing allegiance to a supernatural being."

    Buddhism does not demand blind faith from its adherents. Here mere belief is dethroned and is substituted by confidence based on knowledge. The confidence placed by a follower on the Bu stem to get rid of the ills of life, then it is certainly a religion of religions.
    Things I take issue with in Scriabins article:

    ===========================
    Buddhism is not a religion in the sense in which that word is commonly understood, for it is not "a system of faith and worship owing allegiance to a supernatural being."
    ================================


    Yuk. "allegiance". The very thought of allegiance turns us off. And to some "supernatural being" no less. Hey, I'm 100% self made man.

    Whew! I like Buddhism already!

    ===========================
    Buddhism does not demand blind faith from its adherents.
    ==================================


    Not necessarily. I recall some Zen Buddhist masters who were pretty authoritative. Like coming up to a student by surprise and wacking him with a rod to shock him into a little enlightenment.

    ===================================
    Here mere belief is dethroned and is substituted by confidence based on knowledge.
    =======================================


    I don't know about that. You have to get there first. And you may die of old age trying to attain to that knowledge. Maybe you'll get a few glimmers of enlightenment after 50 years.

    ===========================
    The confidence placed by a follower on the Buddha is like that of a sick person in a noted physician, or a student in his teacher. A Buddhist seeks refuge in the Buddha because it was he who discovered what Buddhist call the Path of Deliverance.
    ================================


    Nothing terribly original there. Jesus was called the Great Physician.


    ===================================
    A Buddhist does not seek refuge in the Buddha with the hope that he will be saved by his personal purification. The Buddha gives no such guarantee. It is not within the power of a Buddha to wash away the impurities of others. One could neither purify nor defile another.
    ===================================


    Not sure about that really. The seeker may not be seeking purification from the Buddha personally. He is still seeking personal purification.

    Ever read Sidhartha? Hermann Hess was fond of Buddhism and captured some aspects of it in his novel. And there was seeking for personal purification. That's why the master was seen bathing in the sacred river.

    =============================
    The Buddha, as Teacher, instructs us, but we ourselves are directly responsible for our purification.
    =============================


    Hmm. Sounds like you are a Buddhist.

    I did not come to mock your faith. So I'll quit here. Just a little pushback for your calling me a blonde.

    Write some more. I'm not here to stop you from speaking enthusiastically about your beliefs.
  15. Joined
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    15 Jun '09 22:39
    ============================
    The Buddha, as Teacher, instructs us, but we ourselves are directly responsible for our purification.
    ================================


    Is that a little bit like what the Apostle Peter wrote?

    "Having purified your souls by obedience to the truth."

    Or Paul "Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling for it is God who operates in you both the willing and the working ..."

    Or "Cleansing yourselves from all defilement of flesh and spirit"

    Similar concepts as to some New Testament utterances there Scriabin.
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