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    15 Aug '12 21:29
    Not sure if this is theme running through other Olympic ceremonies, but did anyone else notice how much occult and mythological symbolism there was in it? I'm not one for reading much into these things, but I was quite surprised by it all.
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    15 Aug '12 21:36
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Not sure if this is theme running through other Olympic ceremonies, but did anyone else notice how much occult and mythological symbolism there was in it? I'm not one for reading much into these things, but I was quite surprised by it all.
    i didnt notice, but i wasnt paying much attention. i guess britains religious roots lie are pagan and the occult has played a large part in our literature and everyday lives, every paper has a horoscope, there seems to be an army of spirit guides touring the country and everybody has a creepy aunt or grandma that reads tea-leafs or tarrot cards. although its a disturbing film there is something bizarrely english about the movie 'the wicker man' (the origninal not nic cage in a bear suit roundhousing barmaids)
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    15 Aug '12 22:21
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Not sure if this is theme running through other Olympic ceremonies, but did anyone else notice how much occult and mythological symbolism there was in it? I'm not one for reading much into these things, but I was quite surprised by it all.
    The Olympics are Pagan in origin, do you find it disturbing that mono theism has not managed to entirely eradicate the old beliefs entirely.
  4. Standard memberavalanchethecat
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    15 Aug '12 22:24
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Not sure if this is theme running through other Olympic ceremonies, but did anyone else notice how much occult and mythological symbolism there was in it? I'm not one for reading much into these things, but I was quite surprised by it all.
    Really? I didn't really notice that. There was a lot of pretty crappy music though.
  5. Standard memberRJHinds
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    15 Aug '12 22:40
    The opening ceremony was pretty good. However, this closing ceremony was a dud.
  6. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Aug '12 22:534 edits
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    i didnt notice, but i wasnt paying much attention. i guess britains religious roots lie are pagan and the occult has played a large part in our literature and everyday lives, every paper has a horoscope, there seems to be an army of spirit guides touring the country and everybody has a creepy aunt or grandma that reads tea-leafs or tarrot cards. althoug ...[text shortened]... t the movie 'the wicker man' (the origninal not nic cage in a bear suit roundhousing barmaids)
    LOL @ creepy old aunt 😀

    Wicker men are Celtic, not English. Traditional English ritual execution involves hanging people or cutting them into blood eagles.

    "They caused the bloody eagle to be carved on the back of Ælla, and they cut away all of the ribs from the spine, and then they ripped out his lungs."

    Uncertain origin, said to be from Anglo-Saxon Chronicle but I can't find it in there:
    http://omacl.org/Anglo/part1.html

    The following is from the Orkneying Saga:
    There they found Halfdan Long-leg, and Einar made them carve an eagle on his back with a sword, and cut the ribs all from the backbone, and draw the lungs there out, and gave him to Odin for the victory he had won"
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    15 Aug '12 23:08
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    LOL @ creepy old aunt 😀

    Wicker men are Celtic, not English. Traditional English ritual execution involves hanging people or cutting them into blood eagles.

    From the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle:

    "They caused the bloody eagle to be carved on the back of Ælla, and they cut away all of the ribs from the spine, and then they ripped out his lungs."
    It was'nt an execution it was a fertility rite, and probably hardly, if ever involved a human sacrifice, lots of woodland, and farmyard animals though.

    Over here, once Aunt's reach 60 they are automatically designated 'Creepy' it's the law.
  8. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Aug '12 23:121 edit
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    It was'nt an execution it was a fertility rite, and probably hardly, if ever involved a human sacrifice, lots of woodland, and farmyard animals though.

    Over here, once Aunt's reach 60 they are automatically designated 'Creepy' it's the law.
    According to Julius Caesar the wicker man was used for human sacrifice. Other medieval writers claimed it was for sacrifice specifically to Taranis (Celtic storm god).

    From wiki:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicker_Man

    Caesar and the geographer Strabo mention the wicker man as one of many ways the Druids of Gaul performed sacrifices.[4] Caesar reports that some of the Gauls built the effigies out of sticks and placed living men inside, then set them on fire to pay tribute to the gods. Caesar writes that though the Druids generally used thieves and criminals, as they pleased the gods more, they sometimes used innocent men when no delinquents could be found.[5]

    One medieval commentary, the 10th-century Commenta Bernensia, states that men were burned in a wooden mannequin in sacrifice to Taranis.
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    15 Aug '12 23:53
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    According to Julius Caesar the wicker man was used for human sacrifice. Other medieval writers claimed it was for sacrifice specifically to Taranis (Celtic storm god).

    From wiki:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicker_Man

    Caesar and the geographer Strabo mention the wicker man as one of many ways the Druids of Gaul performed sacrifices.[4] ...[text shortened]... ta Bernensia, states that men were burned in a wooden mannequin in sacrifice to Taranis.
    Screw Julius Ceasar he was Roman Emperor and a well known propagandist, of course He is going to paint the Celts He was trying to slaughter in the worst possible light.

    It was definitely a form of sacrifice, but it was more likely a rain god as apposed to the nasty storm god claimed by 'monastery' trained scribes.

    Step away from wiki if you want an unbiased view of wicker 😠
  10. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    16 Aug '12 00:20
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    Screw Julius Ceasar he was Roman Emperor and a well known propagandist, of course He is going to paint the Celts He was trying to slaughter in the worst possible light.

    It was definitely a form of sacrifice, but it was more likely a rain god as apposed to the nasty storm god claimed by 'monastery' trained scribes.

    Step away from wiki if you want an unbiased view of wicker 😠
    LOL 😀

    Everybody else did human sacrifice. You think British people are better than the rest?
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    16 Aug '12 00:20
    ahhh!!!!!!, i dont know who to reply to, its like watching your parents argue!!!

    fertility/sacrifice either way the celtic influence runs deep in this septic isle of ours. coming from the north eastern coast and the ginger tinge to my facial hair (despite my brown head hair) and my capacity to drink beer and my ability to sacrifice potential ale if there is a fertile woman around (by woman i mean my wife, just incase she reads this).
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    16 Aug '12 00:26
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    The opening ceremony was pretty good. However, this closing ceremony was a dud.
    r.j.!!!!!! i cant believe it!!!! i almost agree with you. the only difference is i think the opening was way better than 'pretty good' but then it was personal to me and not to you. im surprised a right wing american enjoyed the left wing propaganda of the opening ceremony.
  13. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    16 Aug '12 00:28
    I heard a number of people complain that they didn't have Sir Elton John play.
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    16 Aug '12 00:38
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I heard a number of people complain that they didn't have Sir Elton John play.
    i guess their is a silver lining in every cloud!!
  15. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    16 Aug '12 00:431 edit
    Roman style sacrifice usually involved burying people alive. There was also this sacrifice:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcus_Marius_Gratidianus#Sacrificial_death

    Gratidianus "had his life drained out of him piece by piece, in effect: his legs and arms were first broken, and his eyes gouged out."


    They also threw old men over cliffs and hung young boys. I wouldn't be surprised if the Crucifiction wasn't originally a pagan human sacrifice method.

    Oh yeah, if the legions captured people, sometimes the general would strangle him to death in front of a statue of Mars (or something like that).
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