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General Forum

General Forum

  1. 01 Jan '18 17:00
    Originally posted by @torunn
    Stees, have you had a chance to read during the holidays?
    A bit yes but if the truth be known I am struggling with "The History of Bees."
  2. 01 Jan '18 17:03
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    A bit yes but if the truth be known I am struggling with "The History of Bees."
    Oh dear, well in that case, just leave it. There were tedious parts in the beginning of the story but if you feel you're not getting anywhere with it, give it back to the library and get an interesting book.
  3. 01 Jan '18 17:10
    Originally posted by @torunn
    Oh dear, well in that case, just leave it. There were tedious parts in the beginning of the story but if you feel you're not getting anywhere with it, give it back to the library and get an interesting book.
    I am not one to give up...on anything so I will persevere.
  4. 01 Jan '18 17:11 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    I am not one to give up...on anything so I will persevere.
    Hope you will find it worthwhile - I think you might. I have no other suggestions at the moment.
  5. 01 Jan '18 17:31
    Originally posted by @torunn
    Hope you will find it worthwhile - I think you might. I have no other suggestions at the moment.
    Sometimes it takes a "few" pages to get into a book. The only one, thus far, I tried for about 100 pages (twice) was The Life of Pi and I just couldn't complete it.
  6. 01 Jan '18 17:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    Sometimes it takes a "few" pages to get into a book. The only one, thus far, I tried for about 100 pages (twice) was The Life of Pi and I just couldn't complete it.
    Sometimes you have to get the feel for the people involved, get to know them, and that can take timebut once you have connected, it gets more interesting.
  7. 02 Jan '18 04:39
    I just finished reading John McEnroe's recent book "But Seriously". It's an excellent read and I recommend it highly, even if you're not a tennis player.

    Not reading anything at the moment, but I'm about to sink my teeth into some books on ketogenic diets.
  8. Subscriber FMF
    Main Poster
    02 Jan '18 04:56
    Originally posted by @noearthlyreason
    What are you reading?
    I am going to read Yuval Noah Narari's 'Homo Deus'. I did plan to read it on my trip to Papua in October but I ended up not even laying a finger on it. I should probably read Sapiens first, but I haven't come across it here.
  9. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Jan '18 13:44
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    High rating or not, you have the social instinct of a tarantula. And OF COURSE I fully expect a stinging rebuke, like that would prove you are a real person. Hint: Don't go into politics. It requires empathy, something you sorely lack and BTW you are not the brightest bulb in the candelabra even if you are as you say a national master which is, at 2200 or so, only 600 points lower than the top ten. BTW, you don't even have to bother telling me I am a fish, I already know that.
  10. 02 Jan '18 14:42 / 1 edit
    When I got Bronstein´s "Secret Notes" last summer, I'd read it in one go, and now I am leafing through it again, lingering on some touching parts. It's really good script for a biopic film, and if you added some spy spices, it would sound like it was written by Le Carre.

    Bronstein was practically banned from traveling abroad on tournaments (evil Baturinsky!; and others) from midst seventies, and when it finally got free, he got sick and had to undergo major surgery.

    But he recovered and traveled as a gray lion in his seventies, trying to find another home.
    Spain, Island, Scandinavia - they all could have him, but the living legend wasn't good enough for them. He was guest in rich chess enthusiasts' homes ("I never felt good with rich people around me", he writes) he was poorly paid player for some chess teams, thinking all the time if his serious illness will come back...

    Now and then he played a brilliant game, but he couldn't keep the form on high level during whole tournament.

    Finally he gave up idea of moving abroad and settled back in his wife's university city to die there.

    By accident I played chess several times in Øbro skakforening in Copenhagen, and only after I read this book I discovered that Bronstein played there, too, and that the club president was "a young man with back-pack" who welcomed him in Copenhagen Primo nineties and who now organizes some rapid and standard tournaments in the club.
  11. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    03 Jan '18 22:37
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    Sometimes it takes a "few" pages to get into a book. The only one, thus far, I tried for about 100 pages (twice) was The Life of Pi and I just couldn't complete it.
    If you enjoy mystery, check out The Dry: A Novel by Jane Harper. For good non-fiction,
    look for David Grann's The Lost City of Z, or his new book, Killers of the Flower Moon.
  12. 04 Jan '18 14:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    If you enjoy mystery, check out The Dry: A Novel by Jane Harper. For good non-fiction,
    look for David Grann's The Lost City of Z, or his new book, Killers of the Flower Moon.
    Thank you, I will try to find all of them. I believe Andy's suggestion might also please Stees.
  13. 04 Jan '18 14:57
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    If you enjoy mystery, check out The Dry: A Novel by Jane Harper. For good non-fiction,
    look for David Grann's The Lost City of Z, or his new book, Killers of the Flower Moon.
    The Dry - Swedish title 'Hetta' (the heat) - is available in Swedish and I will try to get it from our library. It has very good reviews.
  14. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    04 Jan '18 20:31
    Originally posted by @torunn
    The Dry - Swedish title 'Hetta' (the heat) - is available in Swedish and I will try to get it from our library. It has very good reviews.
    Another from 2014 (you may know of it already) is All the Light You Cannot See by Anthony Doerr.
  15. 04 Jan '18 20:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    Another from 2014 (you may know of it already) is All the Light You Cannot See by Anthony Doerr.
    Thank you so much - 'Ljuset vi inte ser', a book to my liking, I'm sure.