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Spirituality

Spirituality

  1. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    06 Dec '17 10:00
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    If person A decides that action X is good whereas person B decides that action X is evil, are they both right or is one of them wrong?
    Are you a child?
  2. Standard member dj2becker
    Hoarse whisperer
    06 Dec '17 10:03
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    Are you a child?
    Do you have difficulty answering the question?
  3. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    06 Dec '17 10:06
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    Do you have difficulty answering the question?
    no
    quite clearly because I answered it.

    do you have difficulty comprehending answers?
  4. Standard member dj2becker
    Hoarse whisperer
    06 Dec '17 10:58
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    Are you a child?
    Is this your answer?
  5. 06 Dec '17 13:12
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    If this is the case then a universal good and bad do not exist
    and any gods which may or may not exist cannot be viewed
    as "good" in any universal way. (Individuals may agree with
    the god's morals but it would not necessarily be universal agreement)

    We would also like to know where and how this "god" obtained his
    personal set of morals.
    Sure, I tell you and everyone will know.

    We all know you can't keep any secrets.
  6. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    06 Dec '17 22:23
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    Is this your answer?
    No. It was my answer.
  7. Standard member dj2becker
    Hoarse whisperer
    09 Dec '17 08:39
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    No. It was my answer.
    If two people contradict each other on a moral issue, are they both right or is one of them wrong? Or is there another option?
  8. 09 Dec '17 15:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    If two people contradict each other on a moral issue, are they both right or is one of them wrong? Or is there another option?
    Is the logical negation of “moral” “immoral,” or is it “not-moral.”

    Is the logical negation of:

    “it is morally obligatory to do X”,

    “it is morally obligatory not to do X”

    or is it

    “it is not morally obligatory to do X”?

    You see, if we are going to apply propositional logic to moral claims, there is some groundwork needed.
  9. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    09 Dec '17 16:24
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    If two people contradict each other on a moral issue, are they both right or is one of them wrong? Or is there another option?
    You really are a tedious little man aren't you?
    The premise of this thread is
    Objective morals do not exist

    So why cannot you work out the answer to your own question?
  10. Subscriber apathist
    looking for loot
    09 Dec '17 17:13
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    If two people contradict each other on a moral issue, are they both right or is one of them wrong? Or is there another option?
    The answer is up to you.

    Expect that you should justify yourself.
  11. Standard member dj2becker
    Hoarse whisperer
    09 Dec '17 17:39
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    You really are a tedious little man aren't you?
    The premise of this thread is
    [b]Objective morals do not exist


    So why cannot you work out the answer to your own question?[/b]
    Why are you afraid to give me a straight answer rather than beat about the bush?
  12. Standard member avalanchethecat
    Not actually a cat
    09 Dec '17 19:02
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    Why are you afraid to give me a straight answer rather than beat about the bush?
    It's not fear that stops people talking to you Becker.
  13. 09 Dec '17 19:47 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    Why are you afraid to give me a straight answer rather than beat about the bush?
    One reason (among others) is that we (I, at least) do not want to give you misleading answers. But you ignore my attempts to delve deeper into the real issues you raise. Is that my fault? Or is genuine exploration of issues not your agenda? What IS your agenda? There’s nothing wrong with having one.
  14. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    09 Dec '17 21:33
    Originally posted by @dj2becker
    Why are you afraid to give me a straight answer rather than beat about the bush?
    If you cannot deduce the answer from what I have previously
    posted (and the thread title) then your comprehension is so
    low that any short answer I give is almost certainly going to
    confuse you. I do not have time to write a book for you and
    second guess every moronic question you will ask arising
    from my answers.

    For that reason, I'm out.
  15. Standard member dj2becker
    Hoarse whisperer
    10 Dec '17 03:52
    Originally posted by @js357
    Is the logical negation of “moral” “immoral,” or is it “not-moral.”

    Is the logical negation of:

    “it is morally obligatory to do X”,

    “it is morally obligatory not to do X”

    or is it

    “it is not morally obligatory to do X”?

    You see, if we are going to apply propositional logic to moral claims, there is some groundwork needed.
    As I see it an action can logically be moral, immoral or neither but it can't be both moral and immoral.